Severe thunderstorms across the Upper Midwest

May 30th, 2022 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with time-matched SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) include time-matched SPC Storm Reports — and showed the development severe thunderstorms across parts of the Upper Midwest during the afternoon and early evening hours on 30 May 2022. These storms produced several tornadoes, hail as large as 2.00 inches in diameter and damaging winds as strong as 90 mph.

In the corresponding 1-minute GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (below), pulsing overshooting tops exhibited infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -70ºC (darker black enhancement).

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with time-matched SPC Storm Reports plotted in blue [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

Hurricane Agatha in the East Pacific

May 29th, 2022 |

GOES-17 and GOES-16  “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) — and GOES-16 (GOES-East) after 1621 UTC — “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed Hurricane Agatha after the tropical storm reached hurricane intensity at 1200 UTC on 29 May 2022. Overshooting tops near the storm center exhibited infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -90 to -95ºC at times.

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) include contours of deep-layer wind shear at 12 UTC and 21 UTC — which indicated that Agatha was moving through an environment of relatively low shear, one factor that favored its phase of rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON).

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 12 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 21 UTC [click to enlarge]

Agatha was also moving across warm water, with high Sea Surface Temperature and modest Ocean Heat Content values.

===== 30 May Update =====

GOES-16  “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm, right) images [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

Hurricane Agatha made landfall along the southern coast of Mexico — between Puerto Escondido MMPS and Bohias De Huatulco MMBT —  around 2040 UTC on 30 May, as seen in 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (above).

Swath of wet soil across central Iowa

May 28th, 2022 |

GOES-16 Day Land Cloud RGB images, with radar-estimated Storm Total Precipitation [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

A sequence of GOES-16 (GOES-East) Day Land Cloud RGB images and radar-estimated Storm Total Precipitation (above) revealed a west-to-east oriented swath of wet soil (darker shades of brown) created by thunderstorms that moved across central Iowa on 28 May 2022. Radar-estimated precipitation associated with the swath was generally 1 inch or less.

Given the fairly light precipitation amounts, the swath of wet soil dried rather quickly due to warm and windy conditions across the area (below).

GOES-16 Day Land Cloud RGB images, with plots of hourly surface reports [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

Comparisons of GOES-16 Day Land Cloud RGB, Land Surface Temperature (LST) and radar-estimated Storm Total Precipitation at 1601 UTC and 1701 UTC (below) showed that the swath of moist soil exhibited LST values in the upper 60s to low 70s F (shades of green), in contrast to upper 80s to low 90s F (shades of orange) across adjacent areas of dry soil.

GOES-16 Day Land Cloud RGB, Land Surface Temperature and radar-estimated Storm Total Precipitation at 1601 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Day Land Cloud RGB, Land Surface Temperature and radar-estimated Storm Total Precipitation at 1701 UTC [click to enlarge]

CIMSS Turbulence Fields changed

May 27th, 2022 |
GOES-17 Band 8 (“Low-level water vapor”) Infrared (6.19 µm) fields, 1910 UTC on 27 May 2022, along with derived Turbulence Probability for 30-33 kft, 34-37 kft, 38-41 kft (Click to enlarge)

At the request of AWC and WFO HNL, the turbulence probability fields for AWIPS have been changed (the website — here — is unaltered as of now). The turbulence probability is split into 3 layers that are each 3000 feet thick: 30000-33000 feet ; 34000-37000 feet; 38000-41000 feet. The AWIPS plugin used to display the information has also been changed, so that contours are drawn, as shown above. This will affect AWIPS performance if you are displaying the full disk imagery (because there are so many contours to draw!)