Prescribed burns in Oklahoma, Arkansas ad Missouri

March 7th, 2021 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) depicted smoke plumes and thermal anomalies (clusters of hot pixels) associated with widespread prescribed burns across parts of Oklahoma, Arkansas and Missouri on 07 March 2021.

For one of the largest fires in far southern Oklahoma (located about 15 miles north-northwest of Ardmore), a 4-panel comparison of 5-minute GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared images with components of the Fire/Hot Spot Characterization algorithm — Fire Temperature, Fire Power and Fire Area — is shown below. The highest 3.9 µm infrared brightness temperature (114.8ºC or 387.95 K) and Fire Power (1555 MW) values were seen at 2036 UTC, while the highest Fire Temperature value (924.5 K) occurred at 2056 UTC.

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, top left), Fire Temperature (top right), Fire Power (bottom left) and Fire Area (bottom right) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, top left), Fire Temperature (top right), Fire Power (bottom left) and Fire Area (bottom right) [click to play animation | MP4]

With a broad ridge of high pressure centered over the Lower Mississippi River Valley (surface analyses), its anticyclonic flow could be seen via smoke plumes from multiple prescribed burns across the Deep South — as highlighted by GOES-16 True Color RGB images created using Geo2Grid (below).

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]