“Ring” Solar eclipse shadow moving across northern North America

June 10th, 2021 |

Early on June 10th, 2021 there was a solar eclipse for the northern portions of the globe. This was not a total, but annular (or “ring”) solar eclipse. Satellite instruments, such as NOAA’s ABI on GOES-16 (East) can monitor the shadow of the moon as it falls on the Earth. There are several recent examples from December 2020 (South America), June 2020 (southern Asia), December 2019 (central Pacific), July 2019 (southern hemisphere), January 2019 (Asia) and August 2017 (central US).

GOES ABI

The shadow cast on the Earth could be seen from NOAA’s GOES-16 (East) ABI. This included both the visible and near-infrared spectral bands, and the ABI band 7 (at 3.9 micrometers).

A time animation of NOAA’s GOES-16 ABI band 3 (0.86 micrometers) on June 10, 2021.
A time animation of the cooling associated wit the shadow on the Earth’s surface can be seen in this GOES-16 ABI band 7 (3.9 micrometers) animation.
A time animation of the Full Disk view showing the CIMSS true color spectral composite on June 10, 2021. This product does not employ a Rayleigh correction.

There are other similar loops are posted on many web pages, such as this one from UW/SSEC. This page is a collection of those links.

The 10 UTC composite Full Disk GOES-16 image from June 10, 2021.

A larger image of the GOES-16 10 UTC Full Disk composite shown above.

The shadow from the moon could also been seen from NOAA’s GOES-17 (West) ABI on June 10, 2021.

A more zoomed in GOES-17 view.

AWIPS animation (mp4) of the CIMSS Natural Color RGB from both GOES-16 and GOES-17.

The same loop as above, but as an animated gif. Thanks to Scott.

Japan’s AHI

Japan’s AHI near-infared (band 4 centered at 0.86 micrometers) imagery on June 10, 2021.

While it’s subtle, the shadow could also be seen in Japan’s AHI.

HEO (highly elliptical orbit)

A satellite was recently launched by Russia into a highly elliptical orbit (Molniya). The satellite (Arctica) is in a commissioning phase, but some imagery from the 10-band imager of the eclipse shadow was released.

Google translation: An annular happened today #???????? Suns — For the first time in half a century, it was accessible for observation from Russia; it was best seen from Yakutia and Chukotka. Russian satellites #??????? and #???????? were able to capture this astronomical phenomenon from orbit.

Ground-based Image

A image from Chris Draves over Lake Mendota (Madison, WI).

Background

This map of the eclipse path shows where the June 10, 2021, annular and partial solar eclipse will occur. Times are UTC.
Credits: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio/Ernie Wright.

Credits

NOAA GOES-16 ABI data are via the University of Wisconsin-Madison SSEC Satellite Data Services. Thanks Scott Bachmeier, CIMSS for the AWIPS animation.

Solar eclipse shadow moving across South America

December 14th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed the passage of a total solar eclipse shadow across parts of Chile and Argentina, along with the land surface thermal response due to the interruption of incoming solar radiation. In areas of Argentina beneath the path of totality, the infrared brightness temperature of the land surface decreased by as much as 20-30ºC within the umbral shadow.

A larger-scale view of the path of the eclipse shadow was provided by GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images (below).

GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Vegetaton” (0.86 µm) images (below) highlighted an advantage of that spectral band — namely, brighter surface values over land (due to the higher reflectivity of vegetation at that wavelength), providing more contrast between the land surface and the darker eclipse shadow. The 0.86 µm band is also used to simulate a “green” component for RGB images such as the CIMSS “Natural Color” product.

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Vegetaton” (0.86 µm) images (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA@CIMSS) [click to play animation | MP4]

A closer look at the eclipse shadow passage using 1-minute 0.86 µm imagery is shown below (with the corresponding CIMSS Natural Color RGB images here).

GOES-16 Near-Infrared "Vegetaton" (0.86 µm) images (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA@CIMSS) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Vegetaton” (0.86 µm) images (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA@CIMSS) [click to play animation | MP4]

In a comparison of GOES-16 “Blue” Visible (0.47 µm), “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Near-infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm), CIMSS “Natural Color” RGB and Rayleigh-corrected “True Color” RGB images (below), it can be seen that the Rayleigh-corrected “True Color” is not optimal for displaying features such as solar eclipse shadows (due to over-saturation).

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Blue” Visible (0.47 µm), “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Near-infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm), CIMSS “Natural Color” RGB and Rayleigh-corrected “True Color” RGB mages (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAAf@CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

Incidentally, although the path of totality passed to the north, some reduction of incoming sunlight was apparent over the A68a iceberg (located just southwest of South Georgia island) on GOES-16 Visible images created using Geo2Grid (below).

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB images viewed using RealEarth (below) showed views before and during the time of closest passage of the eclipse shadow.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Other blog posts that show solar eclipse shadows can be seen here.

Solstice solar eclipse shadow moving across southern Asia

June 21st, 2020 |

Himawari-8 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

The shadow of a rare June Solstice annular solar eclipse moved across parts of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and southern Asia on 21 June 2020. In Asia, the path of the shadow of totality was captured on Himawari-8 True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images created using Geo2Grid (above).

The shadow was also evident in FY-2G Full Disk visible imagery, from the SSEC Geostationary Satellite Imagery site (below).

FY-2G Visible images [click to enlarge]

FY-2G Visible images [click to enlarge]

Annular solar eclipse shadow

December 26th, 2019 |

Full Disk Himawari-8 True Color images [click to play animation | MP4]

Full Disk Himawari-8 True Color RGB images (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/CIMSS) [click to play animation | MP4]

Full Disk JMA Himawari-8 True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images (above) showed the shadow of an annular solar eclipse as it moved from west to east across the Indian Ocean, Indonesia and West Pacific Ocean on 26 December 2019.

A closer view using images centered over Indonesia is shown below. The small eye of Category 1 Typhoon Phanfone could be seen in the northern portion of the satellite scene. Bright areas of sun glint (south of the eclipse shadow) highlighted regions having light winds — and therefore a relatively flat water surface which behaved like a mirror to reflect a larger amount of sunlight back toward the satellite.

Himawari-8 True Color images centered over Indonesia [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 True Color RGB images centered over Indonesia [click to play animation | MP4]

The solar eclipse shadow was also seen on Visible (0.73 µm) images from the CMA FY-2G satellite (below), which is positioned father west over the Equator at 105ºE longitude.

CMA FY-2G Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

FY-2G Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]