Geostationary satellite views of the most rain over 72-hours in 2007

February 27th, 2021 |

The record for the most rain over a 72-hour period was in late February 2007, with 3.930m (154.72″)! This was on Reunion Island, associated with Tropical Cyclone Gamede in South Indian Ocean. The island is east of Madagascar. This island also holds the record for the most rain (4,869 mm (191.7 in)) over a 96-hour period, associated with the same event. More on this case can be found in this 2009 BAMS article.

Meteosat-8

While the view of the cyclone from EUMETSAT‘s MET-8 was on the edge of the viewing area, the infrared window loop was still impressive.

A 3-day color-enhanced infrared window loop from EUMETSAT’s Meteosat-8 geostationary imager.

A longer loops of 3 and 4 days were also generated. Which shows Tropical Cyclone Favio as well. For these images, the coldest brightness temperatures have the green/yellow/red/pink colors. A one-day loop (February 25, 2007) in both mp4 and animated gif formats.

Meteosat-7

EUMETSAT’s Meteosat-7, due to its location over the Indian Ocean, had a more direct view of these cyclones.

A 3-day color-enhanced infrared window loop from EUMETSAT’s Meteosat-7 geostationary imager.

Note that the view angle is improved over Meteosat-8, but the image frequency is reduced. A longer Meteosat-7 loop was also generated. Again, Tropical Cyclone Favio can be seen.

A loop of Meteosat-7 visible band from February 25, 2007.

Visible loops (mp4 format) from February 23 and 24 and 26, 2007. The same loops as animated gifs: February 23, 24, 25 and 26, 2007.

H/T

Thanks to @Weather_History for the post on this event.

The above satellite data are from EUMETSAT, accessed via the University of Wisconsin-Madison Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC) Data Services. The images were generated with McIDAS-X. More on EUMETSAT’s Meteosat Third Generation will appear in the Bulletin of the AMS.

Cyclone Yasa strengthens rapidly in the South Pacific

December 16th, 2020 |


Himawari-8 Clean Window Infrared (10.41 µm) imagery, 0000 UTC 14 December to 0000 UTC 16 December 2020 (Click to animate)


Himawari-8 Clean Window Infrared (10.41 µm) imagery (courtesy the Japanese Meteorological Agency, JMA) from 14-15 December 2020 (click here for an animated gif) show the development of a potent storm with an obvious clear and large eye by 0000 UTC on 16 December. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center notes: ” TC 05P HAS RAPIDLY INTENSIFIED 50 KNOTS OVER THE PAST 24 HOURS, FROM 85 KNOTS AT 14/18Z TO 135 KNOTS AT 15/18Z.” Yasa further intensified to a Category 5 tropical cyclone at 0000 UTC on 16 December.


Visible imagery from GOES-17 and Himawari-8, (mp4 animation below, click here for an animated gif, and here for a full-sized mp4), during the day on 16 December show a well-developed storm with a clear eye.


Stereoscopic view of Cyclone Yasa, 1800 UTC 15 December to 0550 UTC 16 December 2020. Click to animate. GOES-17 Visible imagery on the left, Himawari imagery on the right

A storm-centered view of the storm is shown below. Click here for the full-sized mp4, and here for an animated gif.


Storm-centered stereoscopic view of Cyclone Yasa, 1800 UTC 15 December to 0550 UTC 16 December 2020. Click to animate. GOES-17 Visible imagery on the left, Himawari imagery on the right

The animation below is also storm-centered, but zoomed in on the eye of the storm.  Click here for a full-sized mp4, and here for an animated gif


Storm-centered stereoscopic view of the eye of Cyclone Yasa, 1800 UTC 15 December to 0550 UTC 16 December 2020. Click to animate. GOES-17 Visible imagery on the left, Himawari imagery on the right

Forecast models take this strong cyclone over Fiji later this week. Refer to the JTWC, to the RSMC in Fiji or the SSEC Tropical web site for more information.

Stereoscopic views of Cyclones Yasa and Zazu

December 14th, 2020 |



GOES-17 (left) and Himawari-8 (right) visible (0.64 µm) imagery over Fiji, 2100 UTC on 13 December through 0500 UTC on 14 December (Click to animate)

An active area of tropical weather has spawned two tropical cyclones that bracketed the islands of Fiji early on 14 December. Himawari-8 (data courtesy the Japanese Meteorological Agency, JMA) and GOES-17 both viewed the two storms, with Yasa on the left and Zazu on the right, and stereoscopic views are shown above. (To view the imagery in three dimensions, relax/cross your eyes until three images are present, and focus on the image in the center). Click here for a full-sized mp4, and here for an animated gif.

The storms had an interesting development, as shown below in a 3-day Himawari-8 Clean Window infrared imagery mp4 animation (Click here for a large animated gif of the same scene) from 10-13 December 2020. Yasa in particular developed in a region of considerable shear and initially followed a circuitous route (shown in this graphic from RSMC Fiji), but it has since moved into a more favorable environment.  Yasa also absorbed the remains of Tropical Storm #4.



Himawari-8 Clean window infrared (10.41 µm) imagery, 0000 UTC on 10 December – 2350 UTC on 13 December (Click to animate;  data courtesy JMA)


GOES-17 (left) and Himawari-8 (right) visible (0.64 µm) imagery over Fiji, 1900 UTC on 14 December 2020 (Click to enlarge)

Added:  The morning view of the storms, above, from 1900 UTC on 14 December reveals that Zazu is becoming sheared.  The low-level center is exposed with convection shifted to the east.  This is consistent with shear analyses from the SSEC Tropical website, below, that shows westerly shear over the storm.

850-200 mb shear analysis, 1500 UTC on 14 December 2020 (Click to enlarge)

For more information on these storms, refer to the SSEC tropical website (link), or to the RSMC in Fiji (link). At present, Yasa is forecast to make landfall in Fiji later this week as a very strong storm. Interests there should monitor this storm closely.

Cyclone Nivar makes landfall in India

November 25th, 2020 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]'

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Category 1 Cyclone Nivar making landfall along the southeastern coast of India on 25 November 2020.

EUMETSAT Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that Nivar was moving through an environment of low shear (and over warm water) — factors favorable for the storm maintaining its intensity.

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]