Cyclone Nivar makes landfall in India

November 25th, 2020 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]'

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Category 1 Cyclone Nivar making landfall along the southeastern coast of India on 25 November 2020.

EUMETSAT Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that Nivar was moving through an environment of low shear (and over warm water) — factors favorable for the storm maintaining its intensity.

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Medicane makes landfall in Tunisia

November 22nd, 2020 |

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images (above) showed a westward-moving medicane which developed a fairly distinct eye shortly before making landfall along the eastern coast of Tunisia on 22 November 2020.

A Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image displayed using RealEarth (below) provided a higher-resolution view of the medicane’s eye and convective banding at 1152 UTC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image valid at 1152 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image valid at 1152 UTC [click to enlarge]

A plot of surface observations for Monastir’s Habib Bourguiba International Airport DTMB (below) showed that winds gusted to 43 knots as the system made landfall.

Plot of surface observations for Monastir's Habib Bourguiba International Airport [click to enlarge]

Plot of surface observations for Monastir’s Habib Bourguiba International Airport [click to enlarge]

Cyclone Gati makes landfall in Somalia

November 22nd, 2020 |

EWS-G1 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EWS-G1 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Visible (0.63 µm) images (above) showed Category 2 Cyclone Gati as it made landfall along the east coast of Somalia on 22 November 2020. The tropical cyclone rapidly intensified (ADT | SATCON) as it moved westward across the North Indian Ocean (through a corridor of low wind shear).

EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images (below) revealed cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures in the -70 to -80ºC range as the eye was forming after 02 UTC. The eye of Gati opened quickly, but then collapsed and became cloud-filled shortly before landfall. It bears mentioning that in the historical record there are no tropical cyclones of Hurricane intensity making landfall in Somalia.

EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]


EWS-G1 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images (below) also showed the apparent merger of 2 convective clusters — in addition to their brief Fujiwhara-type rotation — prior to Gati’s intensification and the formation of an eye.

Hurricane Iota in the Caribbean Sea

November 15th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Iota intensified to a Category 1 hurricane at 0600 UTC on 15 November 2020 — 1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East)  “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and Mid-level (6.9 µm) Water Vapor images (above) showed that the interior structure of the tropical cyclone improved during the day.

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared (11.2 µm) images, with contours of 02 UTC deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below)showed that the hurricane was moving through an environment of low southwesterly shear, which favored intensification.

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared (11.2 µm) images, with contours of 19 UTC deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared (11.2 µm) images, with contours of 19 UTC deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

===== 16 November Update =====

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Iota rapidly intensified to a Category 5 storm as of 15 UTC on 16 November (ADT | SATCON). 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images from sunrise to sunset are shown above; mesovortices were seen within the eye of the hurricane. Iota had been moving over warm water having  Sea Surface Temperature values of 29-30ºC, which was favorable for intensification.

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

After sunset, Hurricane Iota eventually made landfall along the coast of Nicaragua as a Category 4 storm at 0340 UTC on 17 November — GOES-16 Infrared images (above) indicated an eye structure that was deteriorating and becoming more cloud-filled as the hurricane approached the coast.