Tropical Storm Alex

June 5th, 2022 |

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Storm Alex after it reached tropical storm intensity at 0900 UTC on 05 June 2022. Overshooting tops within the deep convection exhibited infrared brightness temperatures of -80ºC or colder (shades of violet).

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) include contours of deep-layer wind shear at 17 UTC  — which displayed the high shear that was displacing the convection associated with Alex well northeast of the storm center.

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with contours/streamlines of deep-layer wind shear at 1700 UTC [click to enlarge]


The MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (available at this website) animation below tracks Pacific Hurricane Agatha as it makes landfall, and then the accumulation of moisture that is incorporated into Alex.

Rocking MIMIC Total Precipitable Water animation from 0000 UTC on 28 May to 2300 UTC 7 June (and back)

Hurricane Agatha in the East Pacific

May 29th, 2022 |

GOES-17 and GOES-16  “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) — and GOES-16 (GOES-East) after 1621 UTC — “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed Hurricane Agatha after the tropical storm reached hurricane intensity at 1200 UTC on 29 May 2022. Overshooting tops near the storm center exhibited infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -90 to -95ºC at times.

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) include contours of deep-layer wind shear at 12 UTC and 21 UTC — which indicated that Agatha was moving through an environment of relatively low shear, one factor that favored its phase of rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON).

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 12 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 21 UTC [click to enlarge]

Agatha was also moving across warm water, with high Sea Surface Temperature and modest Ocean Heat Content values.

===== 30 May Update =====

GOES-16  “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm, right) images [click to play animated GIF | MP4]

Hurricane Agatha made landfall along the southern coast of Mexico — between Puerto Escondido MMPS and Bohias De Huatulco MMBT —  around 2040 UTC on 30 May, as seen in 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (above).

A month of Himawari imagery over Guam

April 18th, 2022 |

The month-long animation above shows the Himawari-8 Sandwich Product (daytime, blending visible band 3 (0.64 µm) and Band 13 (10.41 µm); and nighttime: Infrared only (Band 13, 10.41 µm) ) for the period from 16 March 2021 through 16 April 2021 over the Pacific Island (1) sector from this site, courtesy of JMA. How has the tropical western Pacific changed over this month? During the first week, mid-latitude extratropical fronts move west to east across the northern part of the domain, brushing the northern Marianas Islands. The monsoon trough over the southern part of the domain shows a lot of activity from the start of an animation, although some periods show more activity than others (25-28 March is quiescent compared to times before and after). A cyclonic circulation moves westward to the south of Guam on 31 March/1 April. Then a stronger impulse moves into the domain from the east on 2-3 April. By 7 April, this tropical storm is south of Guam moving towards the northwest where it becomes Typhoon Malakas. An obvious eye is apparent in that system as it recurves to the west of Guam on 12-13 April. By the end of the animation (17 April), the system has lifted to the north/east of this domain, and the sector has only scattered convection.

Note in particular as the animation occurs how the region of Sun glint has shifted northward. Northern Hemisphere Spring is ongoing.

Himawari-8 Rain Rates in AWIPS with Typhoon Malakas

April 12th, 2022 |
Himawari-8 Band 13 Infrared (10.41 µm) Imagery and Level 2 Rain Rate Product, 0800 UTC on 12 April 2022 (Click to enlarge)

Typhoon Malakas in the western Pacific is shown above in Himawari-8 infrared imagery between Guam and the Philippines. It is a well-developed storm (albeit asymmetric) with an obvious eye. Level 2 Rain Rate from Himawari-8 is also shown; the heaviest precipitation is diagnosed to the southeast of the eye, and in rain bands to the east of the storm.

For more information on Malakas, refer to the SSEC/CIMSS Tropical Weather Website and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.


Himawari imagery is courtesy JMA (Thank you!). Real-time sectorized Himawari imagery from the Meteorological Satellite Center of JMA is also available here.