Eruption of Mount Etna

February 19th, 2021 |

Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (above) showed the signature of a volcanic cloud associated with an eruption of Mount Etna on 19 February 2021. The brighter shades of red/magenta suggested the presence of ash within the volcanic cloud. This was supported by high values of retrieved Ash Loading (below).

Meteosat-11 Ash Loading product [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Ash Loading product [click to play animation | MP4]

A Meteosat-11 Ash Effective Radius Product (below) depicted rather large ash particles, generally in the 14-16 µm range.

Meteosat-11 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation | MP4]

A Meteosat-11 Ash Height product (below) showed retrieved values up to 12-13 km (magenta enhancement) for parts of the volcanic cloud.

Meteosat-11 Ash Height product [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Ash Height product [click to play animation | MP4]

Another version of Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images which use 8.7 µm data (below) revealed shades of green that indicated a higher concentration of SO2 within the southern portion of the volcanic cloud.

Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 False Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Cyclone Nivar makes landfall in India

November 25th, 2020 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]'

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Category 1 Cyclone Nivar making landfall along the southeastern coast of India on 25 November 2020.

EUMETSAT Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that Nivar was moving through an environment of low shear (and over warm water) — factors favorable for the storm maintaining its intensity.

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Medicane makes landfall in Tunisia

November 22nd, 2020 |

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images (above) showed a westward-moving medicane which developed a fairly distinct eye shortly before making landfall along the eastern coast of Tunisia on 22 November 2020.

A Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image displayed using RealEarth (below) provided a higher-resolution view of the medicane’s eye and convective banding at 1152 UTC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image valid at 1152 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image valid at 1152 UTC [click to enlarge]

A plot of surface observations for Monastir’s Habib Bourguiba International Airport DTMB (below) showed that winds gusted to 43 knots as the system made landfall.

Plot of surface observations for Monastir's Habib Bourguiba International Airport [click to enlarge]

Plot of surface observations for Monastir’s Habib Bourguiba International Airport [click to enlarge]

Medicane Ionas after Greece

September 21st, 2020 |

VIIRS Daily True-Color images, 18-21 September 2020 (Click to animate)

What did the Medicane that hit Greece do afterwards?  VIIRS True-color imagery, above, taken from the NASA WorldView site, show an intact feature moving along the northern coast of Africa on 20-21 September towards the Nile Delta.  The amount of cloudiness is in general declining as it moves into a drier environment.  Total Precipitable Water (TPW) from the MIMIC website shows the general drying surrounding the storm.

MIMIC hourly estimates of Total Precipitable Water from 00 UTC on 17 September to 14 UTC on 21 September 2020 (Click to animate)


Rick Kohrs, SSEC/CIMSS, supplied the True-Color multi-day animation from Meteosat-11 imagery below. (Updated on 23 September to include date annotations)

Meteorsat-11 True-Color Imagery over the Mediterranean sea, 15-21 September 2020 (Click to animate)