Cyclone Amphan in the Bay of Bengal

May 18th, 2020 |

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Amphan during the period when it was rapidly intensifying to a Category 5 storm (ADT | SATCON) by 06 UTC on 18 May 2020. In fact, Ampham became the strongest tropical cyclone on record in the Bay of Bengal basin.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images as viewed using RealEarth (below) provided a more detailed view of Amphan shortly before the time of its peak intensity.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

On the following night, toggles between VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 (below) showed a subtle signature of mesospheric airglow waves propagating northward away from the center of Cyclone Amphan.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (credit: William Straka, CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (credit: William Straka, CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (credit: William Straka, CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

A View of the Development of Geostationary Imagers through the lens of BAMS

May 14th, 2020 |

A collection of 60 BAMS covers spanning the years, to highlight the rapid advance of imaging from the geostationary orbit, is shown above (a version that loops more slowly can be seen here). The first cover is the first of BAMS, in January of 1920, while the second, from January of 1957 is the first time artificial ‘satellite’ was in a title of a BAMS article. The third image, from November of 1957, is a remarkable article on potential uses of satellites. This included both qualitative uses: (1) Clouds, (2) Cloud Movements, (3) Drift of Atmospheric Pollutants, (4) State of the Surface of the Sea (or of Large Lakes), (5) Visibility or Atmospheric Transparency to Light — and quantitative uses: (1) Albedo, (2) Temperature  of  a  Level  at  or  Near  the Tropopause, (3) Total Moisture Content., (4) Total  Ozone  Content, (5) Surface  (Ground-Air Interface) Temperature, and (6) Snow Cover. Early covers showcase rockets, balloons and high-altitude aircraft to prepare the way to human space travel (Gemini, Apollo, etc.), polar-orbiters (TIROS, NIMBUS, VHRR, NOAA, etc.) and finally geostationary orbit (ATS-1, ATS-3, SMS, GOES, Meteosat, INSAT, Himawari, etc.).

Reasons to look back at the BAMS covers:

Interactive web page, with links to the original “front matter”.

Montage of select BAMS covers

Montage of select BAMS covers

Note: All cover images are from the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

Year-long Animations of Visible and Infrared Images

March 26th, 2020 |

True-color visible imagery global montage from 6 March 2019 – 5 March 2020 (Click to launch containerized YouTube Vide)

A previous blog post (here) has shown 1-month animations of true-color visible imagery from geostationary satellites (GOES-16, GOES-17, Himawari-8, Meteosat-11 and others) wherein local noon longitudinal strips are blended together to create a global view. (Imagery courtesy Rick Kohrs, SSEC) (See also this blog post for an explanation). The animation above (Click it to view a YouTube animation within a container) shows visible true-color imagery for each day from 6 March 2019 through 5 March 2020.

The infrared imagery below combines the ‘clean window’ Band 13 channel on GOES-16 and GOES-17 (10.3 µm on both) with Band 13 on Himawari-8 (10.4 µm) and shows 2019 data at 6-h intervals.

Color-enhanced Window Channel infrared (ABI: 10.3 µm; AHI: 10.4 µm) imagery from 2019 (Click to launch containerized YouTube Vide)

Storm Jorge impacts the British Isles

March 1st, 2020 |

Meteosat-11 Water Vapor (6.25 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs and gusts (in knots) [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Water Vapor (6.25 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind barbs and gusts (in knots) [click to play animation | MP4]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 Water Vapor (6.25 µm) images (above) showed the large field of strong surface winds associated with Storm Jorge as it approached the British Isles on 29 February – 01 March 2020. Peak wind gusts of 70 knots were recorded in Ireland.

Surface analyses from the Ocean Prediction Center (below) indicated that the Hurricane Force occluded low reached a minimum pressure of 952 hPa at 06 UTC on 29 February.

Surface analyses, from 00 UTC on 29 February to 06 UTC on 01 March [click to enlarge]

Surface analyses, from 00 UTC on 29 February to 06 UTC on 01 March [click to enlarge]