Stereoscopic Views of a storm on the West Coast of the United States

January 14th, 2019 |

GOES-16 (left) and GOES-17 (non-operational, right) Visible Imagery (0.64 µm) at 15-minute timesteps from 1500 to 2245 UTC on 14 January 2019 (Click to animate)

GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational

When GOES-17 was in the test position at 89.5 degrees W Longitude, GOES-16 and GOES-17 in satellite projections could be used to create stereoscopic imagery (example 1; example 2; example 3); the human brain could correct for any projection differences to create 3-dimensional imagery (as explained here, for example). Because GOES-17 is now in its operational position at 137.2 degrees W Longitude, the perspective differences are too great. However, a simple remap of the imagery to the same native projection (Mercator in this case) allows for the construction of animations that show three dimensions, as shown above for the storm making landfall over southern California on 14 January 2019. The coastlines of Washington and Oregon are apparent in the imagery, as is Baja California. Multiple cloud layers become apparent in the imagery.

Geostationary Satellite Matching Webapp

January 8th, 2019 |

A webapp that was developed to match images and hence learn about the ABI spectral bands. After navigating to the page, click and hold on an image, draw a line to the matching image. You can “right click” to open an image. Finally click on the yellow “check” box to verify your selections.

8 Spectral bands

A (30 sec) movie (mp4) showing how to use the matching webapp for 8 of the ABI spectral bands. (Click to play)

One option is to match 8 of the total 16 ABI spectral bands.

16 Spectral bands

Beginning to match two of the 16 ABI spectral bands.

Another option is to match all 16 ABI spectral bands.

Matching Visible bands to ground-based photos

In this case, ABI visible images match to photographs.

With this webapp, one matches the correct ABI visible spectral band with a photograph that was taken on the ground. A short (30-sec) animation on running the webapp: mp4 or mov.

How to use this webapp with your images

Check out this site for directions on how to build a web page to match pairs of images. This webapp is Copyright © 2018 by Tom Whittaker. Images from T. Schmit and NOAA. Inspired by Jordan Gerth’s ABI Matching game.

Questions and other Webapps

Webapps have been developed to demonstrate other concepts of remote sensing, such as pixel size and generating composites.

For any questions.

Mode 4 Testing for both GOES-16 and GOES-17

October 1st, 2018 |

GOES-17 upper-level water vapor infrared imagery (6.19 µm) from 1425-1550 UTC on 1 October (Click to animate)

GOES-17 Data shown in this post are preliminary and non-operational.

Continuous Full Disk (Mode 4) Testing is occurring on October 1 2018.   Mode 4 is the highest data flow rate for the ABI and results in a Full Disk image every 5 minutes.  No mesoscale sectors are produced during Mode 4 operations.  Five-minute CONUS imagery can be produced by subsecting the 5-minute Full-Disk Imagery.  This testing started at 0000 UTC on 1 October and will end at 0000 UTC on 2 October.

The animation above shows GOES-17 Full-Disk imagery for the upper-level water vapor imagery (6.19 µm) with a 5-minute cadence.  The GOES-16 animation for the same time and location is below.

GOES-16 upper-level water vapor infrared imagery (6.19 µm) from 1425-1550 UTC on 1 October (Click to animate)

Careful inspection of the imagery from the two satellites might reveal differences in brightness temperatures between the two instruments. This difference is due to view-angle differences. When the satellite is scanning near the limb, computed brightness temperatures will be cooler because more information detected by the satellite comes from the upper part of the atmosphere. Compare, for example, brightness temperatures just west of former Pacific Hurricane Rosa just west of Baja California. GOES-17, at 89.5 W Longitude, sees warmer temperatures than GOES-16 at 75.2 W Longitude. GOES-16’s view is more oblique, and is through more of the colder upper atmosphere.

GOES-16 and GOES-17 upper-level water vapor infrared (6.19 µm) imagery at 1500 UTC on 1 October 2018 (Click to enlarge)

(Update: GOES-16 returned to Mode-3 scanning at 1549 UTC on 1 October. Continuous Full Disk scanning on GOES-16 lead to degradation of derived products).

Update #2: Animations of 5-minute Full Disk GOES-17 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images from 0000-2355 UTC on 01 October are shown below.

GOES-17 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

One interesting feature on GOES-17 Visible imagery was the east-to-west progression of sun glint off the water of the Amazon River and its tributaries, beginning near the mouth of the river in northeastern Brazil and ending in Ecuador (below).

GOES-17 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17 Data are flowing in GRB

August 28th, 2018 |

GOES-17 0.86 µm Near-Infrared and 3.9 µm Infrared imagery, 1607 UTC on 28 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational

The GOES Rebroadcast (GRB) is now transmitting GOES-17 data that remain Preliminary and non-operational.  The first data sent were at 1530 UTC on 28 August. The toggle above shows Bands 3 (“Veggie Band”, 0.86 µm) and Band 7 (“Shortwave Infrared”, 3.9 µm) from the Meso-1 sector that was positioned over the West Coast at 1607 UTC on 28 August 2018.  Band 13 (“Clean Window”, 10.3 µm), below, from the Meso-2 sector is over the High Plains.

GOES-17 10.3 µm Infrared imagery, 1613 UTC on 28 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Visible (Band 2, 0.64 µm) Imagery from 1531 UTC, below, was produced using CSPP Geo, a software package that reads the GRB signal and produces imagery. (Image courtesy Graeme Martin, CIMSS)

GOES-17 Visible (0.64) Imagery at 1531 UTC on 28 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

The Geo2Grid Software Package can be used with GRB output to produce True-Color imagery, as shown below. The full-disk image was created in about 8 minutes using a centOS server, and it is corrected for atmospheric and solar zenith angle effects. Green Band information is simulated from other ABI channels.

Geo2Grid True Color Imagery, 1700 UTC on 28 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Full Disk examples of imagery from all 16 ABI bands (in addition to a Natural Color RGB image) are shown below (courtesy Mat Gunshor, CIMSS).

GOES-17 Natural Color RGB and individual ABI band images (Click to animate)

GOES-17 Natural Color RGB and individual ABI band images (Click to animate)