Hurricane Florence makes landfall in North Carolina

September 14th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface wind gusts in knots [click to play MP4 animation]

Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina at 1115 UTC (7:15 am EDT) with estimated maximum winds of 78 knots (90 mph) and a minimum central pressure estimate of 958 hPa (28.29″). Overlapping GOES-16 (GOES-East) Mesoscale Domain Sectors provided images every 30 seconds — “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed the storm as it slowly moved inland after sunrise. A peak wind gust of 105 mph was recorded at Wilmington NC (which is located at the center of the GOES-16 images); in northeastern North Carolina, winds gusted to 105 mph at Fort Macon and 112 mph at the New River Inlet Buoy.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with hourly plots of wind gusts [click to play MP4 animation]

The MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (below) showed abundant moisture associated with Florence moving inland during the 48-hour period ending at 23 UTC on 14 September.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

Toggles between Visible and Infrared Window images from Terra/Aqua MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS are shown below.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images at 1620 UTC [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images at 1801 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1835 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1835 UTC [click to enlarge]

Over the western Atlantic Ocean, strong winds associated with Florence created large waves which induced upwelling of colder water from below the ocean surface, as seen in Ocean Heat Content data (below).

Ocean Heat Content data from 14 September [click to enlarge]

Ocean Heat Content data from 14 September [click to enlarge]

Super Typhoon Mangkhut makes landfall in the Philippines

September 14th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation | Animated GIF]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Super Typhoon Mangkhut making landfall as a Category 5 intensity storm over the far northern portion of Luzon in the Philippines just after 17 UTC on 14 September 2018 (1 am local time on 15 September). The eye quickly deteriorated and became cloud-filled after moving inland.

The MIMIC-TC morphed microwave product (below) indicated that Mangkhut was in the process of completing an eyewall replacement cycle shortly before making landfall.

westernMIMIC-TC morphed microwave product [click to enlarge]Mangkhut moved over waters of the western Philippine Sea having high values of Ocean Heat Content and Sea Surface Temperature during the final day preceding landfall (below).

Ocean Heat Content and Sea Surface Temperature data along the path of Mangkhut [click to enlarge]

A look back at “Hurricane Huron” in 1996

September 14th, 2018 |

GOES-8 Visible (0.65 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs and gusts [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-8 Visible (0.65 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs and gusts [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-8 Visible (0.65 µm) images (above) showed the cloud features — including spiral banding and a cloud-free core resembling an eye — associated with a deepening area of low pressure over Lake Huron (surface analyses) on 14 September 1996. This storm acquired some characteristics of a tropical cyclone, being referred to in the literature as “Hurricane Huron“.