Tropical Storm Cristobal makes landfall along the coast of Louisiana

June 7th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) revealed low-level vortices that were pivoting around the analyzed center of Tropical Storm Cristobal as it approached the coast of Louisiana on 07 June 2020, making landfall at 2200 UTC. Wind gusts were as high as 57 mph in Louisiana and 64 mph in Mississippi.

GOES-16 Visible images with overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density (below) indicated that there was very little satellite-detected lightning associated with Cristobal.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density and surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density and surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (below) showed numerous cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -70 to -77ºC (darker shades of red) within some of the convective bands.

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images with plots of Derived Motion Winds (below) showed the broad low-, mid- and upper-level circulation of the tropical storm.

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with plots of Derived Motion Winds [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Longwave Infrared Window (11.2 µm) images, with plots of Derived Motion Winds [click to play animation | MP4]

Rich tropical moisture was being transported northward across the Gulf of Mexico by Cristobal — the Blended Total Precipitable Water (TPW) and Percent of Normal TPW product (below) portrayed a large area with TPW values in the 2.5-3.0 inch range, which represented departures of 175-200% of normal. This led to areas of flash flooding along parts of the Gulf Coast, with some locations receiving 4-8 inches of rainfall.

Blended TPW and Percent Normal TPW images [click to play animation | MP4]

Blended TPW and Percent of Normal TPW images [click to play animation | MP4]

The MIMIC TPW product during the period 03-07 June (below) provided a larger-scale view of the origins of the tropical moisture associated with Cristobal.

MIMIC TPW product, 03-07 June [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC TPW product, 03-07 June [click to play animation | MP4]

Tropical Cyclone Bertha

May 27th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Storm Bertha as it moved inland across South Carolina on 27 May 2020. The clusters of deep convection rapidly dissipated after landfall, revealing the low-level circulation. Bertha did produce heavy rainfall and high winds.

A GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1416 UTC from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) displayed an arc of moderate to heavy precipitation less than an hour following landfall.

GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1416 UTC [click to enlarge]

GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1416 UTC [click to enlarge]

Heavy rainfall and flash flooding in South Florida

May 26th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed training and back-building thunderstorms that produced very heavy rainfall and flash flooding across parts of South Florida — particularly in the Miami (KMIA) area — on 26 May 2020. Pulsing overshooting tops were evident, with cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -77ºC.

The GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product (below) revealed clear-sky TPW values as high as 2.2 inches (lighter shades of magenta).

GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

Hourly images of the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (below) showed the rich tropical moisture associated with a tropical disturbance that had resided over the region for several days.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to enlarge]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to enlarge]

Tropical Depression One-E forms in the East Pacific Ocean

April 24th, 2020 |

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed the circulation of Tropical Invest 90E in the East Pacific Ocean on 24 April 2020. The low-level circulation center appeared to be located about 100 miles southwest of the 18 UTC surface analysis position.

GOES-17 Visible images with a plot of Deep-Layer Wind Shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that Invest 90E was embedded within an environment of low shear — the National Hurricane Center gave the feature an 80% chance of further developing into a tropical depression within 48 hours.

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) with a plot of Deep-Layer Wind Shear at 23 UTC images [click to enlarge]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with a plot of Deep-Layer Wind Shear at 23 UTC [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP as viewed using RealEarth (below) revealed tendrils of transverse banding along the western and northern periphery if the disturbance.

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

===== 25 April Update =====

GOES-17 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 Infrared images (above) showed the period when the disturbance became classified as Tropical Depression One-E at 15 UTC — making this the earliest tropical cyclone on record in the East Pacific basin during the satellite era.

GOES-17 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 Infrared images with plots of tropical surface analyses (above) indicated that TD One-E was situated just north of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The MIMIC-TPW product (below) showed that the tropical depression was tapping moisture from the ITCZ and drawing it northward.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to enlarge]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to enlarge]

GOES-17 Visible images (below) revealed an exposed low-level circulation that was displaced north-northwest of the primary cluster of deep convection.

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]