Hurricane Teddy and wildfire smoke

September 22nd, 2020 |

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images created using Geo2Grid (above) revealed that the large circulation of Hurricane Teddy (downgraded from a Category 2 to a Category 1 storm at 18 UTC) was drawing hazy filaments of smoke — likely originating from wildfires in the western US — southward from eastern Canada and New England, carrying it across the far western Atlantic Ocean on 22 September 2020. Also of interest (early in the animation) were the narrow fingers of river valley fog across parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and Virginia.

Although the size of Teddy’s cloud shield was still fairly large, a DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2217 UTC from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed that no organized core of deep convection remained as the storm began to move across colder waters (Sea Surface Temperature | Ocean Heat Content) and encounter a more hostile environment of increasing deep-layer wind shear.

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2217 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2217 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images, with and without an overlay of Aerosol Optical Depth [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images, with and without an overlay of Aerosol Optical Depth [click to play animation | MP4]

A larger-scale view of GOES-16 CIMSS Natural Color RGB images — with and without an overlay of Aerosol Optical Depth (above) showed that an elongated plume of smoke stretched westward from New York and Pennsylvania to parts of Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa. Upward-looking lidar data from the University of Wisconsin – Madison (below) depicted a thick layer of smoke between altitudes of 2-6 km.

Plots of lidar backscatter and depolarization from 12 UTC o n 22 September to 00 UTC on 23 September [click to enlarge]

Plots of lidar backscatter (top) and depolarization (bottom) from 12 UTC on 22 September to 00 UTC on 23 September [click to enlarge]

Hurricane Teddy rapidly intensifies to a Category 4 storm

September 17th, 2020 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images — with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density (above) showed Hurricane Teddy as it rapidly intensified (ADT | SATCON ) to a Category 4 storm on 17 September 2020. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were in the -80 to -85ºC range.

Metep-A ASCAT surface scatterometer wind speeds were as high as 74 knots in the northwestern portion  of the eyewall (below).

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) image, with plots of Metop-A ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) image, with plots of Metop-A ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

Microwave (85 GHz) DMSP-17 (at 1023 UTC), GMI (at 1720 UTC) and DMSP-18 (at 2034 UTC) images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site are shown below.

DMSP-17 SSMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1023 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-17 SSMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1023 UTC [click to enlarge]

GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1720 UTC [click to enlarge]

GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1720 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2034 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMI Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2034 UTC [click to enlarge]

Hurricane Sally

September 15th, 2020 |

GOES-16 Clean Window Infrared (10.3 µm) Imagery over Sally, 1113 – 1312 UTC 14 September 2020. GLM Flash Density (1-minute observations) are also plotted (Click to animate)

Hurricane Sally was moving very slowly in the north-central Gulf of Mexico at sunrise on 15 September 2020. A GOES-16 Mesoscale sector placed over the storm allowed for 1-minute imagery, and the Clean Infrared window animation, above, for the 2 hours centered on Sunrise, show a compact storm south of Mobile Bay and east of the Mississippi River delta. Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data overlain on the ABI imagery show active lightning in a feeder band to the east of the storm, but little lightning in the storm center.

GOES-16 Upper Level (6,19 µm) and Lower Level (7.34 µm) water vapor imagery, 1311 UTC on 15 September 2020 (Click to enlarge)

Intensification of Sally has been affected by dry air near the storm (as mentioned in this discussion, for example). The toggle above of GOES-16 infrared upper-level and lower-level water vapor imagery (observed at 6.19 µm and 7.34 µm, respectively), shows warm brightness temperatures to the west of the storm.  These warm temperatures (yellow in the 7.34 µm image, blue in the 6.19 µm image) are regions of mid-level dryness:  the top of the moist layer is farther down in the atmosphere in these regions.

Morphed microwave imagery, below, (from this site), shows the effect of dry air on the storm structure.  The eyewall almost forms — but it is eroded along its southern edge by dry air.

Morphed Microwave imagery following the center of Hurricane Sally for the 24 hours ending 1300 UTC on 15 September (Click to enlarge)

The 1200 UTC MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (TPW) field, below (from this site) suggests that dryer Continental air might be affecting the storm.  Advected Layer Precipitation Water from 1200 UTC (here, from this site), tells a similar tale.

Microwave-derived Total Precipitable Water, 1200 UTC on 15 September 2020 (Click to enlarge)

Visible imagery, below, at sunrise shows a thick clouds over the center of the storm.  The appearance is similar to yesterday’s. A visible animation (from 1130-1313 UTC) without the GLM overlay is available here.

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GOES-16 visible imagery (0.64 µm) with 1-minute GLM Flash Density overlain, 1145 – 1311 UTC 15 September (Click to animate)

===== 21 UTC Update =====

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images — with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density (above) showed a series of convective bursts that rotated around the center of Category 1 Hurricane Sally during the daylight hours. Minimal GLM-detected lightning activity was seen with these convective bursts.

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (below) showed Sally at 1806 UTC. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperature northwest of the eye was -86ºC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1806 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1806 UTC [click to enlarge]

For the latest information on Hurricane Sally, refer to the pages of the National Hurricane Center.  (Direct link to Sally)

Hurricane Sally in the northern Gulf of Mexico

September 14th, 2020 |

Sally was upgraded to a Hurricane at 1600 UTC on 14 September. (Link)

MIMIC total precipitable water, 12 UTC 13 September – 11 UTC 14 September 2020 (Click to enlarge)

Hurricane warning have been issued along the central Gulf Coast on 14 September as strengthening tropical storm Sally approached.  MIMIC estimates of total precipitable water, above, for the 24 hours ending at 11 UTC on 14 September show the moist airmass in the Gulf that is helping to sustain the storm.  (Also apparent in the imagery:  Hurricane Paulette, moving over the island of Bermuda, and Pacific Tropical Storm Karina.  (For more information on these storms (and other storms during this active Atlantic Hurricane Season), and for the latest on Sally, refer to the National Hurricane Center)

Both Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 overflew Sally between 0700 and 0800 UTC on 14 September, and Day Night Band imagery for the storm (source) is shown below. The 50-minute time step between the two images show little because of a lack of lunar illumination, but westward expansion of the cloud shield near the Mississippi River delta is apparent. This suggests adequate upper-level divergence for continued storm intensification.

Suomi NPP (0707 UTC ) and NOAA-20 (0757 UTC) Day Night Band imagery on 14 September 2020 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 animations of infrared imagery for the 12 hours endings near 1300 UTC on 14 September, below, also show an expansion in the size of the coldest cloud tops in the storm’s center. A frontal zone is also apparent in the infrared imagery, stretching from New York/Pennsylvania southwestward to north Texas. This front will limit how far north the effects of Sally — post landfall — can move. (The forecast as of 14 September moves the post-landing remnants of Sally through Georgia).

GOES-16 Clean Window Infrared (10.3 µm) Imagery over Sally, 0116 – 1316 UTC 14 September 2020 (Click to animate)

Low-level Water vapor infrared imagery (GOES-16 Band 10, at 7.3 µm; click here for the Upper-level Water vapor infrared imagery, at 6.2 µm), below, using an enhancement courtesy William Churchill, WFO Key West (Click here for the Band 10 animation with a more familiar, perhaps, ‘dry yellow’ enhancement), also shows the expansion of the clouds in the central core of the storm. An apparent outflow channel from the storm south over Cuba also shows up in the animation.

GOES-16 Low-Level water vapor Infrared (7.3 µm) Imagery over Sally, 0926 – 1331 UTC 14 September 2020 (Click to animate)

A GOES-16 mesoscale sector is viewing the development of Sally, allowing for 1-minute imagery.  Visible imagery below, for two hours shortly after sunrise, shows active convection ongoing in the center of the storm and an obvious expansion of the central dense overcast. Both things support strengthening is the inner core structure.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) imagery, every minute, from 1233 to 1432 UTC on 14 September 2020 (Click to animate)

===== 21 UTC Update =====

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density) [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images — with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density (above) showed Hurricane Sally after it was upgraded to a Category 2 storm at 21 UTC. A series of convective bursts could be seen developing near the center of Sally; as is usually the case, very little GLM-detected lightning activity was associated with these types of convective bursts located within close proximity to the eye. Winds at Viocsa Knoll — an elevated oil platform, located just northwest of the storm center — gusted to 94 knots or 108 mph at 2100 UTC (shortly after gusting to 102 knots or 117 mph at 2020 UTC).

You can find more information on Sally at the SSEC Tropical Website (Link). For official forecasts, refer to the pages of the National Hurricane Center. Interests along the central Gulf Coast should be preparing for the arrival of this storm, in addition to monitoring its progress.