Tropical Invest 97L in the western Atlantic Ocean

September 29th, 2014
GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images with METAR surface reports (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images with METAR surface reports (click to play animation)

Tropical Invest 97L formed near Bermuda during the pre-dawn hours on 29 September 2014. After sunrise, AWIPS II images of GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel data (above; click image to play animation) revealed a well-defined low-level circulation spinning just to the west of Bermuda. It is interesting to note that at 12:55 UTC a waterspout was reported 4 km to the east of the Bermuda International Airport (station identifier TXKF), associated with a band of deep convection that was moving northward (below).

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel image with Bermuda METAR observation

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel image with Bermuda METAR observation

An overpass of a Metop satellite at 14:38 UTC provided a good view of the surface wind field with data from the ASCAT scatterometer instrument (below). There was one wind vector with a speed around 30 knots (green) just to the east of the center of circulation.

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel image with Metop ASCAT scatterometer surface winds

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel image with Metop ASCAT scatterometer surface winds

A comparison of Terra MODIS 0.65 µm visible channel and 11.0 µm IR channel images at 15:25 UTC (below) showed that the coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperatures of -55º C (orange color enhancement) were located to the north of the circulation center.

Terra MODIS 0.65 µm visible channel and 11.0 µm IR channel images

Terra MODIS 0.65 µm visible channel and 11.0 µm IR channel images

Strong early-season storm in the North Pacific

September 23rd, 2014
GOES-15 6.5 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 6.5 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

The GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel imagery above showed the development and evolution of a strong mid-latitude cyclone in the eastern North Pacific Basin during the 21-23 September 2014 time period; of particular interest was the development of strong subsidence behind the storm (depicted by brighter shades of yellow), and also a second jet starting to approach the storm from the west (as evidenced by increasing cold cloud tops in the base of the trough at the end of the animation). A closer view of the storm using AWIPS II imagery is available here. The strong storm had access to abundant sub-tropical moisture, as depicted in the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water animation below.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (click to enlarge)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (click to enlarge)

The ASCAT Scatterometer that flies on METOP gives routine observations of surface winds over the ocean. A large area of storm-force winds (in red) was depicted in the image below (from 0630 UTC on 23 September), overlain on the GOES-15 Water Vapor imagery.

 GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel image and ASCAT winds, 0630 UTC on 23 September (click to enlarge)

GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel image and ASCAT winds, 0630 UTC on 23 September (click to enlarge)

A comparison of 4-km resolution GOES-15 6.5 µm and 1-km resolution Aqua MODIS 6.7 µm water vapor channel images at 11:30 UTC, below, demonstrated the benefit of higher spatial resolution for providing a more accurate display of the water vapor gradients and various small-scale features (such as transverse banding associated with cold clouds to the north of the storm), along with the polar-orbiter image elimination of geostationary parallax error for more more precise feature location.

GOES-15 6.5 µm and Aqua MODIS 6.7 µm water vapor channel images

GOES-15 6.5 µm and Aqua MODIS 6.7 µm water vapor channel images

The GOES sounder Total Column Ozone product, below, showed an increase in ozone values (350-380 Dobson Units, darker green to lighter green color enhancement) as the tropopause was lowered in the vicinity of the deepening mid-latitude cyclone.

GOES sounder Total Column Ozone product (click to play animation)

GOES sounder Total Column Ozone product (click to play animation)

A Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color image from the SSEC RealEarth web map server, below, provided a good view of the lower-level clouds associated with the storm.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color image

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color image

For a more detailed analysis of this event from the Ocean Prediction Center perspective, see the Satellite Liaison Blog.

MODIS false-color images show areas of flooding in Montana

August 26th, 2014
Before (12 August) and after (26 August) MODIS false-color RGB images

Before (12 August) and after (26 August) MODIS false-color RGB images

Some locations in northeastern Montana received up to 7-8 inches of rainfall over a 5-day period (NWS Glasgow rainfall map), which led to flooding in many areas. A comparison of before (12 August) and after (26 August) 250-meter resolution MODIS false-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images from the SSEC MODIS Today site (above) showed the areal extent of flooding (cyan to darker blue areas on the 26 August image). The RGB images use MODIS bands 7/2/1 to help highlight the areas of of floodwater.

The maps below show the total observed rainfall, the departure from normal, and the percent of normal for the 7-day period ending on 26 August.

Observed 7-day rainfall

Observed 7-day rainfall

7-day rainfall departure from normal

7-day rainfall departure from normal

7-day rainfall percent of normal

7-day rainfall percent of normal

Toxic Algal Bloom in Western Lake Erie

August 4th, 2014
Terra MODIS True Color Imagery (click to play animation)

Terra MODIS True Color Imagery (click to play animation)

As happened in 2011, an algae bloom is ongoing over Lake Erie. The current bloom has contaminated at least one water intake for Toledo, Ohio’s municipal water supply with microcystin, a cyanobacter that when ingested can damage the liver and nauseate people. (There is also significant danger to pets). A series of true-color images (from 4 July, 1 August and 4 August) taken from the MODIS Today website, above, (combining visible channels at 0.6465 µm [red], 0.5537 µm [green] and 0.4656 µm [blue]) shows changes in the water color over the past month. (Image Source: MODIS Today) Some changes are apparent over western Lake Erie that are associated with the toxic bloom.

The algal growth is more readily apparent in the false-color imagery below. This red/green/blue image is constructed with 2.1143 µm imagery as ‘red’, 0.8567 µm imagery as ‘green’ and 0.6465 µm imagery as ‘blue’. The animation including scenes from 4 July, 1 August and 4 August shows dramatic growth between 1 and 4 August. Near-infrared channels — such as 0.8567 µm — are sensitive to energy reflected by algae.

Terra MODIS True Color Imagery (click to play animation)

Terra MODIS True Color Imagery (click to play animation)

A series of True-Color images for six days this Spring/Summer is here. The increase in algae in the western part of Lake Erie is apparent, but it seems that the outbreak this year is less wide-spread than the outbreak in October of 2011. A series of False-Color images is here.

[Update, 5 August 2014: Toledo's water supply has been deemed safe to drink]