Tropical Disturbances in both Hemispheres

February 19th, 2019 |

Morphed Total Precipitable Water for the 24 hours ending 0100 UTC on 19 February 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Morphed Total Precipitable Water imagery (from this site) for the 24 hours ending at 0100 UTC on 19 February 2019, above, shows two Tropical disturbances spinning on either side of the Equator. Cyclone Oma in the Southern Hemisphere was northwest of New Caledonia in the Coral Sea. A second disturbance over the north Pacific, albeit very close to the Equator, was near Pohnpei and will pass near Chuuk later this week. Interests in Micronesia should pay attention to this area of disturbed weather.

Himawari-8 Clean Window imagery (10.41 µm) (courtesy JMA), below, shows the better organization of Oma in contrast to the more disorganized nature of the tropical wave over Pohnpei.

Himawari-8 AHI Clean Window (10.41 µm) Infrared Imagery, 1400 UTC 18 February – 0230 UTC 19 February 2019 (Click to play animated gif)

Refer to the CIMSS Tropical Webpage (Link) for more information on Oma. The National Weather Service on Guam is issuing statements on the tropical system in Micronesia. (From 0245 UTC on 19 February 2019, for example) (Update: This is now Tropical Depression 02W; a projected path as of 1200 UTC on 19 February is here. The current forecast has this storm achieving typhoon status late Wednesday).

Moisture Streaming towards Southern California

February 14th, 2019 |

Morphed Microwave Total Precipitable Water, 1800 UTC 13 February to 1700 UTC 14 February 2019 (Click to enlarge)

A potent Atmospheric River is affecting the California Coast on 14 February 2019. The morphed microwave imagery, above (from this site), shows rich moisture from deep in the tropics moving onto the southern California and northwest Mexican coasts.  The animation below shows the Layered Precipitable water — also a product derived from microwave imagery — for the same time period, but at 3-hour time steps (from this site).  An interesting feature is that the 850-700 hPa moisture layer is not as continuous back to the tropics as the other 3 layers.

Advected Layer Precipitable Water, 18z 13 February to 18z 14 February 2019 (Click to enlarge)

You can also infer a large influx of moisture from the low-level water vapor imagery, as shown in the short animation below from GOES-17, from 1617 UTC (just as Loop Heat Pipe issues that cause missing data were ramping down) to 1857 UTC. One might also infer a long-duration event from this animation!

GOES-17 ABI Band 10 Infrared 7.3 µm Imagery (Low-Level Water Vapor Band) from 1617 UTC to 1857 UTC on 14 February 2019 (Click to animate)

The GOES-R All-Sky Total Precipitable Water product (from this site) is as yet produced only from GOES-16 data (The Loop Heat Pipe problems have a strong impact on all Baseline products, including Legacy Profiles that are used to create Total Precipitable Water, which impact is still under investigation). The western Pacific is on the limb of this product, but it does capture the deep moisture moving towards southern California.

GOES-16 All-Sky Total Precipitable Water, 1400 UTC on 14 February 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Much of the San Diego National Weather Service Forecast Office County Warning Area is under Flood and/or Wind Warnings! See the Screen Capture below from 1121 AM Pacific Standard Time.

Warnings (as of 11:21 AM PDT on 14 February 2019) over the San Diego County Warning Area (Click to enlarge)

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 microwave products

November 30th, 2018 |

GCOM-W! AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products, from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 1692 UTC on 30 November [click to play animation]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products, from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 1692 UTC on 30 November [click to play animation]

A series of GCOM-W1 AMSR2 swaths during the period from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 1692 UTC on 30 November 2018 (above) showed the global coverage of Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products from that polar-orbiting satellite.

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water, Wind Speed, Surface Rain Rate and Cloud Liquid Water products [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water, Wind Speed, Surface Rain Rate and Cloud Liquid Water products [click to enlarge]

A closer look just south of the Atlantic provinces of Canada (above) showed a comparison of Total Precipitable Water, Wind Speed, Surface Rain Rate and Cloud Liquid Water products over a strong mid-latitude cyclone at 0545 UTC on 29 November (the 0532 UTC time stamp on the images denotes the beginning time of that particular satellite swath).

Surface analyses from the OPC (below) classified this low pressure system as Hurricane Force at 00 UTC and Storm Force at 06 UTC — however, AMSR2 ocean surface wind speeds were as high as 71 knots west of the surface low, 84.8 knots north of the low and 95.6 knots in the vicinity of the occluded front.

Surface analyses at 00 UTC and 06 UTC [click to enlarge]

Surface analyses at 00 UTC and 06 UTC [click to enlarge]

Shortly after the overpass of GCOM-W1, additional views of the western portion of this storm were provided by Aqua MODIS and NOAA-20 VIIRS (below). (note: the NOAA-20 VIIRS images are incorrectly labeled as Suomi NPP)

Aqua MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images at 0543 UTC [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Water Vapor (6.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images at 0543 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 0557 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 0557 UTC [click to enlarge]

Another overpass of GCOM-W1 about 10 hours later continued to show a broad region of strong post-frontal westerly winds to the south of the storm center (below). During that period, the occluded low continued to deepen from 957 to 952 hPa (surface analyses).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water, Wind Speed at 0532 and 1529 UTC [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products at 0532 and 1529 UTC [click to enlarge]

Additional features seen in the AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products in other parts of the world included the following:

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products at 0353 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products south of Iceland at 0353 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Low pressure south of Iceland (surface analyses), with an ocean surface wind speed of 76 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products off the US West Coast at 1026 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products off the US West Coast at 1026 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Low pressure off the US West Coast (surface analyses), with an ocean surface wind speed of  70 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products north of Hawai'i at 1202 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products north of Hawai’i at 1202 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Low pressure and a cold front northwest of Hawai’i (surface analysis), with a long fetch of tropical moisture and widespread ocean surface wind speeds of 60-70 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products southwest of Australia at 1659 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products southwest of Australia at 1659 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Low pressure southwest of Australia, with an ocean surface wind speed of 47 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products southeast of Argentina at 1659 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products southeast of Argentina at 1659 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Low preesure and a cold front southeast of Argentina, with TPW as high as 2.2 inches and an ocean surface wind speed of 58.6 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the North Sea at 0259 UTC on 30 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the Norwegian Sea at 0259 UTC on 30 November [click to enlarge]

Low pressure over the Norwegian Sea (surface analysis), with an ocean surface wind speed of 75 knots (above).

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the Aleutian Islands at 1247 UTC on 30 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the Aleutian Islands at 1247 UTC on 30 November [click to enlarge]

A plume of moisture and strong winds ahead of a low pressure and cold front (surface analysis) moving across the Aleutian Islands (above).

Due to the frequent overlap of polar-orbiting satellite swaths at high latitudes, some locations can have data coverage from numerous consecutive overpasses. The example below shows the Barents Sea — between 70-80º N latitude — during 7 consecutive swaths from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 0847 UTC on 29 November.

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the Barents Sea from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 0847 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

GCOM-W1 AMSR2 Total Precipitable Water and Wind Speed products over the Barents Sea from 2256 UTC on 28 November to 0847 UTC on 29 November [click to enlarge]

Increasing ice concentration in Hudson Bay

November 21st, 2018 |

Sea ice concentration derived from AMSR2 data, 06-21 November [click to play animation | MP4]

Daily sea ice concentration derived from AMSR2 data, 06-21 November [click to play animation | MP4]

After increasingly colder air began moving from eastern Nunavut across Hudson Bay beginning on 06 November (surface analyses), the daily sea ice concentration as derived from GCOM-W1 AMSR2 data (source) began to increase in the northern half of Hudson Bay (above) — especially after 15 November once mid-day (18 UTC) temperatures colder than -20ºF were seen at reporting stations along the northwest coast.

A sequence of daily Terra/Aqua MODIS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images (source) showed signatures of the increasing of ice coverage.

Terra/Aqua MODIS True Color RGB images, 06-21 November [click to play animation | MP4]

Daily Terra/Aqua MODIS True Color RGB images, 06-21 November [click to play animation | MP4]

A toggle between Terra MODIS True Color and False Color RGB images on 21 November (below) confirmed that much of the northern half of Hudson Bay contained ice — snow/ice (as well as ice crystal clouds) appear as darker shades of red in the False Color image (in contrast to the cyan shades of supercooled water droplet clouds).

Terra MODIS True Color and False Color RGB images on 21 November [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True Color and False Color RGB images on 21 November [click to enlarge]

19 November maps of Ice Concentration, Ice Stage and Departure from Normal via the Canadian Ice Service (below) further characterized this ice formation, which was ahead of normal for the central portion of Hudson Bay.

Ice Concentration [click to enlarge]

Ice Concentration [click to enlarge]

Ice Stage [click to enlarge]

Ice Stage [click to enlarge]

Ice Concentration Departure [click to enlarge]

Ice Concentration Departure [click to enlarge]