Hurricane Gert

August 15th, 2017 |

GOES-16 imagery (all 16 ABI Bands) from 1912-2132 UTC, 15 August 2017 [click to play animation]

GOES-16 imagery (all 16 ABI Bands) from 1912-2132 UTC, 15 August 2017 [click to play animation]

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Hurricane Gert, a Category-1 storm on the Saffir-Simpson scale, is over the open Atlantic Ocean east of Cape Hatteras. It is close enough to the USA, however, that it is within GOES-16’s CONUS domain where 5-minute sampling is routine. The animation above shows all 16 channels from GOES-16 ABI, every five minutes from 1912-2132 UTC on 15 August 2017. A distinct eye is not apparent in the visible or infrared satellite imagery, but microwave data (from here) suggests an eye is present, at least at times. A comparison of 2035 UTC DMSP-16 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) and 2045 UTC GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images can be seen here.

The low-level Water Vapor imagery, below, shows that Gert is south and east of a front along the East Coast. This front should steer the storm to the north and east. Swells from the storm will affect the East Coast however.

GOES-16 imagery Low-Level Water Vapor (7.34 µm) Infrared Imagery from 1832-2137 UTC, 15 August 2017 [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Low-Level Water Vapor (7.34 µm) Infrared Imagery from 1832-2137 UTC, 15 August 2017 [click to play animation]

For more information on Gert, consult the website of the National Hurricane Center, or the CIMSS Tropical Weather Website.

GOES-16 ABI Imagery from the morning of 16 August 2017, below, shows that an eye has appeared in visible and infrared imagery.

GOES-16 imagery (all 16 ABI Bands) from 1117-1337 UTC, 16 August 2017 [click to play animation]

GOES-16 imagery (all 16 ABI Bands) from 1117-1337 UTC, 16 August 2017 [click to play animation]

A closer view using 1-minute interval GOES-16 Mesoscale Sector Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, below, showed that  the most vigorous areas of deep convection were generally confined to the northern semicircle f the eyewall region — cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were as cold as -80º C (violet color enhancement) at times. .

GOES-16 Visible (0,64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Suomi NPP and the Solar Eclipse on 21 August 2017

August 14th, 2017 |

The paths that Polar Orbiting satellites take around the Earth are predictable, and the prediction for next Monday, 21 August 2017 is shown above (image courtesy Rick Kohrs, SSEC). Note that Suomi NPP has an ascending orbit passing over the eastern part of the USA, from Florida to Michigan, at predicted times of 1830-1834 UTC on 21 August 2017. At 1832 UTC, Suomi NPP should be over the Great Smoky Mountains.

At the same time, the shadow of totality will be over eastern Tennessee as well, as shown below (from this site). Thus, Suomi NPP will be well-positioned to observe a snapshot (with excellent spatial resolution) of the umbral shadow of this eclipse, to complement the excellent temporal resolution of GOES-16.

Note: GOES-16 also observed the shadow of the 26 February 2017 solar eclipse in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on Himawari-8 viewed the shadow of the Eclipse in the western Pacific Ocean on 9 March 2016 (Click here for an mp4 animation of all 16 AHI Channels).

Tropical Storm Emily forms in the eastern Gulf of Mexico

July 31st, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery from 1102-1327 UTC on 31 July 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Tropical Storm Emily has formed in the eastern Gulf of Mexico on 31 July 2017, just to the west of Tampa/St. Petersburg, Florida. Its presence is possibly related to the surface front that has sagged south into Florida over the weekend.  (Sea Surface Temperatures in the area are very warm as well.) In the Visible (0.64 µm) animation above (a slower animation is available here), the curved bands of the low-level cloud field are noticeable just northwest of the large convective cluster near Tampa Bay.  Clean Window (10.3 µm) Infrared Imagery shows that offshore convection waned between 1100 and 1300 UTC, shifting to a location just south of Tampa.  (Click here for a slower animation)

GOES-16 Clean Window Infrared (10.33 µm) Imagery from 1102-1327 UTC on 31 July 2017 (Click to animate)

About an hour after Emily made landfall, a toggle between Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images, below, showed the compact cluster of deep convection — cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were as cold as -74º C just off the Florida coast.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images (Click to enlarge)

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images (Click to enlarge)

For more information on Emily, refer to the National Hurricane Center website, or to the CIMSS Tropical Weather Pages.

GOES-16 ABI Mesoscale Sector imagery and GLM data with strong thunderstorms over Wisconsin

July 12th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI Band 13 (“Clean Window”) 10.3 µm Imagery, every minute from 1000 – 1359 UTC on 12 July 2017, with GLM Lightning Flash locations for each minute (yellow circles) superimposed (Click to animate)

GOES-16 ABI and GLM data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Strong morning thunderstorms with a few severe weather reports, and abundant heavy rain (24-h totals ending 1200 UTC on 12 July 2017, from here), spread over the northern part of the GOES-16 default western Mesoscale Sector on the morning of 12 July 2017. The animation above shows the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) 10.3 µm imagery with Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Lightning Flash event locations superimposed, at 1-minute timescales. The top of the default Mesoscale Sector cuts through central Wisconsin.

Click here to see a graphic with the GLM Flashes for the 3 different hours.