Solar eclipse in the Southern Hemisphere

July 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

A total solar eclipse occurred across the southern Pacific Ocean and parts of South America on 02 July 2019 — GOES-17 (GOES-West) “stretched” True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images (above) showed the eastward progression of the eclipse shadow.

On the view from GOES-16 (GOES-East), the eclipse shadow can be seen beginning to move across South America just before sunset (below). Grayscale GOES-16 Infrared imagery is displayed where there is not enough (or there is no) sunlight to use any of the ABI Visible and Near-Infrared spectral bands for RGB imagery.

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Full Disk GOES-17 and GOES-16 True Color RGB imagery combined and displayed in a Mollweide projection is shown below (courtesy of Rick Kohrs, SSEC).

Suomi NPP and the Solar Eclipse on 21 August 2017

August 14th, 2017 |

The paths that Polar Orbiting satellites take around the Earth are predictable, and the prediction for next Monday, 21 August 2017 is shown above (image courtesy Rick Kohrs, SSEC). Note that Suomi NPP has an ascending orbit passing over the eastern part of the USA, from Florida to Michigan, at predicted times of 1830-1834 UTC on 21 August 2017. At 1832 UTC, Suomi NPP should be over the Great Smoky Mountains.

At the same time, the shadow of totality will be over eastern Tennessee as well, as shown below (from this site). Thus, Suomi NPP will be well-positioned to observe a snapshot (with excellent spatial resolution) of the umbral shadow of this eclipse, to complement the excellent temporal resolution of GOES-16.

Note: GOES-16 also observed the shadow of the 26 February 2017 solar eclipse in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on Himawari-8 viewed the shadow of the Eclipse in the western Pacific Ocean on 9 March 2016 (Click here for an mp4 animation of all 16 AHI Channels).

GOES-16: visible and true-color images of a solar eclipse shadow

February 26th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 ABI Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 — the first of the GOES-R seriesABI visible (0.64 µm) images captured the Lunar Umbra (or solar eclipse shadow) of the “ring of fire” annular eclipse that occurred in the Southern Hemisphere on 26 February 2017. The dark eclipse shadow could be seen moving from west to east, beginning over the southern Pacific Ocean, passing over far southern Chile and Argentina, and finally moving over the southern Atlantic Ocean. GOES-16 will routinely scan the Full Disk every 15 minutes (the current GOES Full Disk scan interval is once every 3 hours), but in a special mode can scan the Full Disk every 5 minutes.

The path of the eclipse shadow (courtesy of EarthSky.org) is shown below.

Path of 26 February 2017 solar eclipse shadow [click to enlarge]

Path of 26 February 2017 solar eclipse shadow [click to enlarge]

True-color GOES-16 Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images are shown below (courtesy of Kaba Bah, CIMSS).

GOES-16 true-color images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 true-color images [click to play animation]

Note: the GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing on-orbit testing.

Solar eclipse shadow as seen from geostationary satellites

March 9th, 2016 |

Himawari-8 true-color images [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 true-color images [click to play MP4 animation]

The shadow of the total solar eclipse of 09 March 2016 was captured by a number of geostationary satellites, including JMA Himawari-8 (above; also available as either a large 140 Mbyte animated GIF, or a YouTube video: large) | small) and KMA COMS-1 (below). The Himawari-8 true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images were created using the Simple Hybrid Contrast Stretch (SHCS) method by Yasuhiko Sumida, SSEC visiting scientist from JMA.

COMS-1 Visible (0.67 um) images [click to play animation]

COMS-1 Visible (0.67 um) images [click to play animation]

Toward the end of the eclipse, the shadow was also seen with NOAA GOES-15 (below) as it moved northwest and north of Hawai’i.

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

In addition, the eclipse shadow was captured with the Chinese satellites FY-2E and FY-2G (below).

FY-2E Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to enlarge]

FY-2E Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to enlarge]

FY-2G Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to enlarge]

FY-2G Visible (0.73 µm) images [click to enlarge]