Karymsky eruption on Kamchatka

November 3rd, 2021 |
Himawari-8 derived Ash Loading, 0440 – 1230 UTC on 3 November 2021

Imagery from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Monitoring website (link) shows derived Ash loading (above) from the 3 November eruption of Karymsky on the Kamchatka peninsula. The website identified an eruption beginning around 0720 UTC, with an obvious eruptive plume by 0740 UTC. In addition to Ash Loading, shown above, Ash Height (click here for an 8-h mp4 animation) was also derived; a still image from 1110 UTC, below, shows two separate plumes, one around 6 km (indicated by the white arrow), one closer to 10-12 km (indicated by the magenta arrow).

Retrieved Volcanic Ash height, 1110 UTC on 3 November 2021 (Click to enlarge)

In addition to quantitative estimates of ash, Himawari-8 (and GOES-R and GK2A) channels can be combined in RGBs to highlight qualitatitely regions where ash is likely. The animation below (from Scott Bachmeier) shows the Ash RGB. (Click here for a Quick Guide on this RGB)

Himawari-8 Ash RGB Imagery showing the Karymsky Ash Cloud, 0710-1250 UTC 3 November 2021 (click to enlarge)

A tip of the (winter) Hat to Nathan Eckstein, NWS AAWU in Anchorage, for alerting us to this event.

The GOES-R Day Cloud Type RGB

November 3rd, 2021 |
GOES-16 Day Cloud Type RGB, Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB, Level 2 Cloud Top Pressure, all at 1401 UTC on 3 November 2021 (Click to enlarge)

A new RGB will be implemented into AWIPS in the near future: it is scheduled for the next TOWR-S build to be released in December. Developed by NESDIS Geo Senior Scientist and Cirrus Channel (GOES-R Band 4, 1.38 µm) aficionado Dr. Andy Heidinger, the Day Cloud Type RGB starts with the Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB (available online here, for example) and substitutes Cirrus Channel (Band 4, 1.38 µm) information for the Band 13 (10.3 µm) Clean Window information in the ‘Red’ component of the RGB. The result is much better detection of thin cirrus in this daytime-only product, as shown in the toggle above that includes the Day Cloud Type and Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGBs as well as the Level 2 Cloud Top Pressure. Note in particular the thin cirrus in the Gulf of Mexico just to the north of the Yucatán Peninsula. Cloud properties for this thin cirrus also show up in the Level Cloud Top Pressure (shown in the toggle above) and in Cloud Top Height.

A similar relationship is shown in the toggle below, from 1806 UTC on 2 November. Note the thin cirrus over central Wisconsin, for example: much more obvious in the Day Cloud Type RGB, and present in the Cloud Top Pressure (and Cloud Top Height) product. A similar relationship is apparent over central North Dakota and over northern Ontario: the Day Cloud Type RGB better isolates regions of highest cirrus compared to the Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB.

GOES-16 Day Cloud Type RGB, Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB, Level 2 Cloud Top Pressure, all at 1806 UTC on 2 November 2021 (Click to enlarge)

A preliminary Quick Guide for the Day Cloud Type RGB is here. XML Code used to add this RGB to AWIPS is available from the blogpost author.