Large hail in Texas

April 28th, 2021 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (bottom), with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) include time-matched plots of SPC Storm Reports of large hail produced by supercell thunderstorms that developed and moved eastward across southern Texas on 28 April 2021. Hail as large as 4.00 inches in diameter was listed in the SPC Storm Reports, but one giant hailstone was found whose diameter was 6.4 inches (Update: this hail was confirmed to be a Texas state record):



Vigorous overshooting tops were seen in both the Visible and Infrared GOES-16 images, with the coldest IR brightness temperatures in the -80 to -89ºC range (shades of violet to purple) — and along the southern flank of the storms, inflow feeder bands were evident the Visible imagery. 00 UTC rawinsonde data from Del Rio, Texas (below) showed that parcel temperatures of -80 to -89ºC would indicate significant vertical overshoots of both the equilibrium level (-67ºC) and the tropopause (-74.7ºC).

Plot of rawinsonde data from Del Rio, Texas [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Del Rio, Texas [click to enlarge]

Farther to the north, 1-minute GOES-16 Infrared images (below) showed other thunderstorms that produced large hail (up to 3.25 inches in diameter) in the Dallas/Fort Worth area after sunset.

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]