GOES-13 brought out of storage

June 21st, 2019 |

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-13 was taken out of storage on 19 June 2019 to begin a period of Image Navigation and Registration (INR) testing — the Satellite Data Services positioned a spare rooftop antenna to begin ingesting the GVAR data from the satellite (positioned over the Equator at 60.2º W longitude) . Visible images from 21 June are displayed above. According to NOAA: “With the established performance of NOAA’s new geostationary satellites, GOES-16 (as GOES-East) and GOES-17 (as GOES-West), and a healthy GOES-14 in reserve, NOAA can provide GOES-13 to the Air Force for their weather forecasting needs. After a check of the GOES-13 instruments, NOAA will operate the satellite on behalf of the Air Force during its remaining life span.”

A 5.5-hour animation of all five spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager is shown below.

Images from all 5 spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager [click to enlarge]

All 5 spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager [click to enlarge | MP4]

Water Vapor images from GOES-17 (GOES-West), GOES-15, GOES-16 (GOES-East) and GOES-13 (below) — all centered at Glasgow, Montana — showed the development of an anomalously-deep (for 21 June) mid-tropospheric cutoff low over eastern Montana. The images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

Water Vapor images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-16 and GOES-13, all centered at Glasgow, Montana [click to play animation | MP4]

Water Vapor images, from left to right: GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-16 and GOES-13, all centered at Glasgow, Montana [click to play animation | MP4]

===== 25 June Update =====

All 5 spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager [click to enlarge]

All 5 spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager [click to enlarge]

A 23.5-hour animation of all five spectral bands of the GOES-13 Imager is shown above, centered over Wisconsin.

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-13 Visible images centered near Cape Verde in western Africa (above) showed that the INR quality of GOES-13 was still very good.

===== 26 June Update =====

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) and Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) and Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

A test of GOES-13 Rapid Scan Operations (RSO)was conducted on 26 June — a sequence of Infrared Window and Visible images (above) revealed the presence of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) off the US East Coast, following the dissipation of its parent nocturnal thunderstorm.

Anomalous cutoff low over the Beaufort Sea

June 12th, 2019 |

GOES-17 Mid-leve Water Vapor (6.9 µm, top) and GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm. bottom) imagess [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, top) and GOES-15 Water Vapor (6.5 µm. bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

A comparison of Water Vapor images from GOES-17 (GOES-West) and GOES-15 Water Vapor images (above) showed the signature of an anomalously-deep closed low that was moving southeastward over the Beaufort Sea north of Alaska during the 11 June – 12 June 2019 period. The images are shown in the native projection of each satellite — GOES-17 is positioned over the Equator at 137.2º W longitude, while GOES-15 is located at 128º W. The improved GOES-17 spatial resolution (2 km at nadir, vs 4 km for GOES-15) and more frequent imaging (every 10 minutes, vs every 30 minutes for GOES-15) allowed for a better depiction of this cutoff low — including smaller-scale features near the center of the broad circulation.

GFS model 500 hPa geopotential height, wind, and standardized height anomaly (source) analyses at 6- hour intervals (below) indicated 500 hPa geopotential height anomaly values reached -3 to -4 sigma (lighter shade of violet) for this cutoff low.

6-hourly GFS 500 hPa geopotential height, wind, and standardized height anomaly [click to enlarge]

6-hourly GFS 500 hPa geopotential height, wind, and standardized height anomaly [click to enlarge]

30-second GOES-17 images over Oregon/Idaho/Nevada

May 29th, 2019 |

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Due to an overlap of GOES-17 (GOES-West) Mesoscale Domain Sectors, images were available at 30-second intervals — and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed the development of thunderstorms over southeastern Oregon, southwestern Idaho and northern Nevada on 29 May 2019. Some of these thunderstorms produced heavy rainfall and small hail in southwestern Idaho, and a cold air funnel was spotted in northern Nevada (local storm reports).

A comparison of Visible images from GOES-17 and GOES-15 images (below) helps to underscore some of the improvements in the GOES-R series of satellites over their predecessors — with images every 30 seconds compared to every 4-15 minutes (with gaps of 30 minutes during the Full Disk scans every 3 hours), the short-term convective trends could be better monitored using GOES-17. Also note that the GOES-15 Visible images do not appear as bright as those from GOES-17 — prior to the GOES-R Series of satellites, the performance of visible detectors degraded over time, leading to imagery that appeared more dim as the Imager instrument aged. Visible detectors on the new ABI instrument benefit from on-orbit calibration to remedy this type of degradation.

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports; images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite [click to play MP4 animation]

Stationary linear boundary over the Pacific Ocean

May 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-17 Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm), Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) and

GOES-17 Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm), Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

In a comparison of GOES-17 (GOES-West) Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm), Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above), the Water Vapor imagery revealed an interesting stationary linear boundary — oriented NNW to SSE, near 152-154ºW longitude — over the North Pacific Ocean on 02 May 2019. In addition, note the other linear boundary that propagated from E to W, moving right through the aforementioned stationary boundary (best seen in the 6.19 um Upper-level Water Vapor imagery). There was no evidence of either of these linear features in the corresponding GOES-17 Infrared imagery, or in Visible imagery (not shown). A perfect candidate for the “What the heck is this?” blog category.

One possible explanation for the curious stationary feature was that it resulted from a convergence of flow around the cutoff low to the east and a digging trough approaching from the west. GOES-15 Infrared cloud-tracked Derived Motion Winds from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) did show evidence of some converging flow in that region. Derived Motion Winds from GOES-17 were still in the Beta stage, and were not available for display in AWIPS.

GOES-15 Infrared cloud-tracked Derived Motion Winds [click to enlarge]

GOES-15 Infrared cloud-tracked Derived Motion Winds [click to enlarge]