Early ABI Images from GOES-18

May 12th, 2022 |

NOAA and NASA recently released the first ABI (Advanced Baseline Imager) imagery from GOES-18 (including this 2-min video). GOES-T was launched on March 1st. In fact, both GOES-16 and GOES-17 monitored the rocket signature. GOES-18 is the third in the GOES-R series and is currently located above approximately 90W. Soon GOES-18 will move to a “near West” position. GOES-18 is slated to become NOAA’s operational GOES-West in early 2023 after going through many tests. Before that, the ABI on GOES-18 will become the operational imager during two GOES-17 Loop Heat Pipe times. Also see this satellite liaison post.

Spectral Loop of 16 bands (from the Full Disk sector)

A true color composite image, along with all 16 spectral bands of the preliminary, non-operational GOES-18 ABI on May 5, 2022.

The above loop as an mp4 and animated gif. The ABI has 16 spectral bands, 2 in the visible, 4 in the near-infrared (or “near-visible”) and 10 in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. There are also ABI band “fact sheets” in Spanish and French.

Another view of the 16 spectral bands of the ABI, both as an mp4 and animated gif. Or see this loop of the true color imagery during the day and an infrared window at night.

The 16 spectral bands of the ABI on May 5, 2022 at 18 UTC.

The “low-level” water vapor band (10) is very important. A loop showing 2 low’s over North America.

GOES-18 ABI “water vapor” band 10 (7.3 micrometers) loop from May 5 and 6, 2022. (click to play)

Of course the ABI Full Disk sectors also views over much of the disk, including of Hudson Bay with a day snow fog RGB (mp4) and South America (fog and suspended sediment).

Ice and clouds over Hudson Bay from GOES-18 RGB on May 5, 2022. (click to play)
Fog along the west coast of South America on May 5, 2022 as seen by the GOES-18 ABI day snow fog RGB. (click to play)
True color imagery showing the suspended sediment of the South American coast on May 5, 2022. (click to play)
A combined full disk GOES-18 loop over a day (true color and longwave window) from May 6 and 7, 2022.

ABI 16-Panel (CONUS region)

The 16 spectral bands of the (Preliminary/Non-operational) GOES-18 ABI from May 5, 2022. (Click to play)
The 16 spectral bands of the (Preliminary/Non-operational) GOES-18 ABI from May 6, 06 UTC to May 7, 06 UTC. (Click to play)

The ABI has 16 spectral bands, 2 in the visible, 4 in the near-infrared (or “near-visible”) and 10 in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. GOES-18 image covering the contiguous United States collected by the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) in 16 spectral bands on May 5, 2022.  This 16-panel image shows the two visible, four near-infrared and 10 infrared channels on the ABI. The visible near-IR bands are gray-colored, while the infrared bands have the warmer brightness temperatures mapped to warmer colors. The different appearance of each band is due to how each band reflects or absorbs radiation. Each spectral band was scanned at approximately the same time, starting at approximately 18 UTC. The above mp4 loop and one of the frames.

Meso-scale sectors

The ABI scans two smaller meso-scale regions every 60 seconds, which provides 30-sec imagery if the regions overlap. These channels help forecasters and others distinguish phenomena such as clouds, water vapor, fires, smoke, dust, ice, land/sea surface temperatures and volcanic ash.

A combined visible and infrared “sandwich” view over Minnesota and Wisconsin early on May 11, 2022. Images every one minute. (Click to play)

Recent meso-scale coverage from the GOES-18 ABI include: Texas, New Mexico and Minnesota (mp4 and animated gif). A similar loop, but just showing the ABI “red” visible band.

1-min meso “sandwich” imagery over Texas on May 5, 2022 as seen by GOES-18 ABI. (click to play)

H/T

Thanks to the many (thousands) who made the GOES-18 ABI possible. These GOES-18 ABI are early images (preliminary and non-operational, calibration improvements are possible. Both McIDAS-X and geo2grid software was used in generating these images. More about GOES-16 and GOES-17.

Comments are closed.