Severe weather in Oklahoma, Texas and Louisiana

April 22nd, 2020 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed thunderstorms that produced a variety of severe weather (SPC Storm Reports) across far southern Oklahoma on 22 April 2020. These discrete supercell storms developed along a cold front associated with a low pressure system moving across the region (surface analyses).

GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images with plots of time-matched SPC Storm Reports are shown below.

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm, top) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm, bottom) images, with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm, bottom) images, with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Farther to the southeast across eastern Texas, GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (below) revealed a large and long-lived supercell thunderstorm that eventually moved eastward into Louisiana.

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images with plots of time-matched SPC Storm Reports are shown below. An Above-Anvil Cirrus Plume was produced by this thunderstorm, and cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were as cold as -80ºC (violet pixels). Early in its life cycle, after dropping hail of 1.0-2.0 inches in diameter, the supercell produced the fatal EF-3 Onalaska tornado.

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm, top) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm, bottom) images, with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm, bottom) images, with plots of SPC Storm Reports [click to play animation | MP4]

A toggle between 1-km resolution NOAA-19 AVHRR Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images at 2338 UTC (below) provided a more detailed view of the Above-Anvil Cirrus Plume. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperature in the region of the overshooting top was -84.7ºC.

NOAA-19 AVHRR Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 AVHRR Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Additional imagery of these storms is available on the Satellite Liaison Blog.

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