Hurricane Fernanda

July 17th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible [0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Visible [0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

On 15 July Hurricane Fernanda became the first Category 4 tropical cyclone of the 2017 Northern Hemisphere season. GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the development of a well-defined eye during the period of rapid intensification. As the National Hurricane Center mentioned, it was unusual to have a hurricane of this intensity at such a low latitude in the Eastern North Pacific Basin.

Fernanda fluctuated between Category 3 and Category 4 intensity during the 15-17 July period (ADT | SATCON) as it passed over the warm waters of the East Pacific Ocean (Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Heat Content) — and trochoidal oscillations in the northwestward motion of the eye could be seen in GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) imagery (below).

GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 ABI Mesoscale Sector imagery and GLM data with strong thunderstorms over Wisconsin

July 12th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI Band 13 (“Clean Window”) 10.3 µm Imagery, every minute from 1000 – 1359 UTC on 12 July 2017, with GLM Lightning Flash locations for each minute (yellow circles) superimposed (Click to animate)

GOES-16 ABI and GLM data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Strong morning thunderstorms with a few severe weather reports, and abundant heavy rain (24-h totals ending 1200 UTC on 12 July 2017, from here), spread over the northern part of the GOES-16 default western Mesoscale Sector on the morning of 12 July 2017. The animation above shows the GOES-16 Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) 10.3 µm imagery with Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Lightning Flash event locations superimposed, at 1-minute timescales. The top of the default Mesoscale Sector cuts through central Wisconsin.

Click here to see a graphic with the GLM Flashes for the 3 different hours.

Large iceberg breaks off the Larsen-C ice shelf in Antarctica

July 12th, 2017 |

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images on 12 July 2017 (above; courtesy of William Straka, SSEC) shows the large iceberg (named A-68) that had separated from the Larsen-C ice shelf in Antarctica (Project MIDAS).

===== 13 July Update =====

A 12 July vs 13 July comparison of VIIRS Infrared Window and Day/Night Band images (below) revealed a slight expansion of the ice fracture, as Iceberg A-68 slowly drifted away from the Larsen-C ice shelf.

12 July vs 13 July Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

12 July vs 13 July Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

12 July vs 13 July Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images [click to enlarge]

12 July vs 13 July Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images [click to enlarge]

1-minute GOES-16 images: severe thunderstorms in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota

July 11th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.6 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red (on Visible) and black (on Infrared) [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.6 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red (on Visible) and black (on Infrared) [click to play MP4 animation]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

Severe thunderstorms developed in the warm sector of a mid-latitude cyclone that was moving eastward along the US/Canada border on 11 July 2017.  GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the storms that produced tornadoes, wind gusts to 80 mph and hail as large as 2.00 inches (SPC storm reports) across far eastern North Dakota and far northwestern Minnesota (NWS Grand Forks summary). Time-matched SPC storm reports are plotted on the images — the report locations are parallax-corrected to match the location o the cloud-top features. Overshooting tops were very evident on the Visible and Infrared imagery; in addition, pronounced cold/warm Thermal Couplets and/or Enhanced-V signatures were seen in the Infrared images.

Farther to the south, other storms (below) produced hail as large as 3.00 inches and wind gusts to 75 mph across northeastern South Dakota (NWS Aberdeen summary).

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red (on Visible) and black (on Infrared) [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red (on Visible) and black (on Infrared) [click to play MP4 animation]