Tropical Storm Don

July 18th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

On 17 July Tropical Storm Don became the 4th named storm of the 2017 North Atlantic Basin season. The satellite presentation improved somewhat on 18 July, with GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) displaying a few brief convective bursts (some of which exhibited cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -80º C  and colder).

A GOES-13 (GOES-East) Infrared Window (10.7 µm) image at 1845 UTC  with overlays of the Tropical Overshooting Tops and  Deep-Layer Winds products from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site is shown below.

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with Tropical Overshooting Top and Deep-Layer Wind Shear products [click to enlarge]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with Tropical Overshooting Top and Deep-Layer Wind Shear products [click to enlarge]

Mesoscale Convective Vortex over Arizona

July 18th, 2017 |

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with SPC storm reports of severe winds plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image, with SPC storm reports of severe winds plotted in cyan [click to enlarge]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

Strong summer monsoon season thunderstorms developed over Arizona in the pre-dawn nighttime hours on 17 July 2017, producing damaging winds across the Phoenix area (SPC storm reports). A Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image (above) revealed cloud-top brightness temperatures as cold as -77º C at 0508 UTC.

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed the development and eventual dissipation of the overnight convection.

GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with station identifiers plotted in yellow and SPC storm reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with station identifiers plotted in yellow and SPC storm reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation]

During the following daytime hours, GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) displayed the circulation of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) as it propagated west-southwestward. Note that surface dew point temperatures were in the upper 60s  to low 70s F across southern Arizona.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface reports [click to play animation]