Hourly Infrared Animation for June 2015

July 1st, 2015 |


The video embedded above shows GOES-13 Water Vapor imagery each hour for all of June. Water vapor imagery (6.5 µm) is handy for tracking features in the atmosphere, and various circulations are plain in the animation, including Tropical Storm Bill and Pacific Hurricanes Blanca and Carlos. The 10.7 µm window channel animation is shown below.


Tornadic Thunderstorm over eastern Colorado

June 5th, 2015 |
GOES-14 Visible 0.6263 µm Visible imagery over Colorado, 2345 UTC 5 June 2015.  See text for details (Click to enlarge)

GOES-14 Visible 0.6263 µm Visible imagery over Colorado, 2345 UTC 5 June 2015. See text for details (Click to enlarge)

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman OK had the Plains of northeast Colorado and adjacent States in a Slight Risk (or higher) threat of severe weather on 4 June 2015. The visible image, above, shows a tornado-producing severe thunderstorm over Elbert County that produced a long-lived tornado, according to the SPC Storm Reports. The reported start and end points of the tornado (and observed times) are indicated as well. Elbert (farther northeast) and El Paso (farther southwest) counties are outlined.

The evolution of the tornadic cell was captured while GOES-14 was operating in SRSO-R mode. An animated gif of the evolution from 1915 UTC 4 June through 0130 UTC on 5 June is (warning: 190M animation!) here. A YouTube video of the mp4 is below. Note that the tornado formed along the obvious moisture boundary made visible by the arc of cumulus clouds south and east of the severe storm. (This post from the Hazardous Weather Testbed blog shows the moisture gradient as a gradient in CAPE) One-minute imagery allows an extraordinarily detailed look at features in the very dynamic cloud-top; overshooting tops develop and decay very quickly as the storm develops and matures. An animation of 10.7µm imagery from 2100 UTC through 0600 UTC on 5 June is available on YouTube here. Click here (180M gif) for a storm-centered animated gif of the tornadic storm (Also available as an mp4 and on YouTube).



Bore over Kansas

June 3rd, 2015 |
GOES-13 Imager 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Imager 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

Visible imagery after sunrise on 3 June 2015 over Kansas, above, shows the parallel lines of low clouds that characterize a bore feature. As the bore penetrated southward, winds initially shifted before becoming more variable. Bore propagation requires the presence of an inversion, and 1200 UTC Soundings from both Dodge City and from Topeka contain inversions. Because inversions are present, it is unusual for convection to form in the presence of a bore.

The initial southward push the became the bore may have emerged from strong convection over central Nebraska early in the morning of 3 June. Suomi NPP VIIRS imagery captured that convection; the Day Night Band (under near-Full Moon conditions) and 11.45 µm infrared imagery, below, show the strong convection at 0848 UTC on 3 June 2015).

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.70 µm visible Day Night Band and 11.45 µm infrared imagery at 0848 UTC on 3 June 2015 (click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.70 µm visible Day Night Band and 11.45 µm infrared imagery at 0848 UTC on 3 June 2015 (click to play animation)

GOES-14 was performing SRSO-R observations over Kansas on 3 June. One-minute imagery of the bore evolution is available here in animated gif format (74 M in size) and here in mp4 format (2.8M in size). The YouTube video is embedded below.



GOES-14 SRSO-R imagery: severe thunderstorms in Texas and Oklahoma

May 25th, 2015 |


GOES-14 remained in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSO-R) mode on 25 May 2015, providing 1-minute 0.63 µm visible channel imagery of severe thunderstorms that produced widespread damaging winds, large hail, and tornadoes  (SPC storm reports) across much of Texas (above; also available as an MP4 movie file). One fatality and four injuries were reported at 2104 UTC in Pettibone, Texas (denoted by the asterisk in this GOES-14 visible/IR comparison).

The animation below (YouTube 1080p HD version; also available as an MP4 movie file) is centered a bit farther north, to cover storms that developed in Oklahoma. The enhancement is also tailored to help highlight the thunderstorm overshooting tops and storm-top gravity wave features.