Typhoon Maysak in the West Pacific Ocean

March 30th, 2015
Himawari-8 AHI 0.64 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

Himawari-8 AHI 0.64 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

McIDAS-V images of Himawari-8 AHI 0.64 µm visible channel data (above; click image to play animation; images courtesy of William Straka, CIMSS) showed the evolution of Category 2 Typhoon Maysak over the West Pacific Ocean on 30 March 2015.

An 11:01 UTC MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image with an overlay of 11:11 UTC Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds from the CIMSS Tropial Cyclones site (below) revealed the wind field in the eastern semicircle of the tropical cyclone.

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image with Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image with Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

Several hours later, a comparison of a 19:01 UTC MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image with a 19:00 UTC DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image (below) showed that the microwave instrument was able to “see” through the clouds surrounding the eye to depict the larger size of the eyewall structure.

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image + DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR image + DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image

During the later hours of 30 March, Typhoon Maysak underwent a period of rapid intensification from a Category 2 to a Category 4 storm, as depicted on a plot of the Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) intensity estimate (below).

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) intensity estimate plot for Typhoon Maysak

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) intensity estimate plot for Typhoon Maysak

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR channel images during this period of rapid intensification are shown below (click image to play animation).

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR images (click to play animation)

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR images (click to play animation)

Category 5 Cyclone Pam in the South Pacific

March 12th, 2015
MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR images (click to play animation)

MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR images (click to play animation)

Cyclone Pam in the South Pacific Ocean was rated at Category 5 intensity by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center at 18 UTC on 12 March 2015. MTSAT-2 10.8 µm IR channel images (above; click image to play animation; also available as an MP4 movie file) showed the well-defined eye as the storm moved southwestward across the Vanuatu archipelago during the 12-13 March time period.

The corresponding MTSAT-2 0.7 µm visible channel images (below; click image to play animation) revealed a complex structure of gravity waves and transverse banding surrounding the eye.

MTSAT-2 0.7 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

MTSAT-2 0.7 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

A comparison of the 12 March 21:32 UTC MTSAT-2 visible image and the 21:44 UTC Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site is shown below.

MTSAT-2 visible image and Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

MTSAT-2 visible image and Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

Just prior to the time when Pam was beginning to enter a period of rapid intensification (ADT intensity estimate plot), a nighttime comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 11.45 µm Infrared images at 13:37 UTC on 11 March is shown below.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 11.45 µm Infrared images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 11.45 µm Infrared images

Tropical Storm Niko (07P) in the South Pacific Ocean

January 20th, 2015
MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product, with Tropical Surface Analyses (click to play animation)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product, with Tropical Surface Analyses (click to play animation)

AWIPS images of the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (above; click image to play animation) showed a broad moist plume in the equatorial South Pacific Ocean, within which Tropical Storm Niko began to develop during the 19 January – 20 January 2015 period. By the end of the animation, Gale Force winds were being analyzed within the eastern semicircle of the developing cyclone. Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds at 08:01 UTC (below) showed winds as strong as 42 knots (though the direction of the stronger yellow wind barbs was suspect, likely due to rain contamination).

MIMIC TPW product, with Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

MIMIC TPW product, with Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds

After daybreak on 20 January, McIDAS images of GOES-15 (GOES-West) 0.63 µm visible channel data (below; click image to play animation) showed the development of spiral banding wrapping into the central low-level circulation center as the system reached tropical storm intensity by 18 UTC.  In addition, a few strong convective pulses with distinct overshooting tops could be seen near the core of Niko.

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

An animation of GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) included an overlay of contours of the deep layer (200 – 850 hPa) wind shear at 18 UTC — Tropical Storm Niko developed in a region characterized by low wind shear, which enabled the storm to rapidly intensify.

GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images, with contours of deep layer wind shear

GOES-15 10.7 µm IR channel images, with contours of deep layer wind shear

Tropical Cyclone Bansi in the Indian Ocean

January 13th, 2015
Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) intensity estimate

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) intensity estimate

A plot of the Advanced Dvorak Technique intensity estimate for Tropical Cyclone Bansi (above) showed that the storm experienced a period of rapid intensification late in the day on 12 January 2015, reaching Category 4 intensity by 00 UTC on 13 January.

EUMESAT Metosat-7 11.5 µm IR channel images (below; click to play animation; also available as an MP4 movie file) revealed the formation of a well-defined eye, which also exhibited a notable amount of trochoidal motion or “wobble” as it moved across the southwest Indian Ocean (north of Reunion and Mascarene Island).

Meteosat-7 11.5 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

Meteosat-7 11.5 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

A more detailed view of Tropical Cyclone Bansi was provided by McIDAS-V images of Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR and 0.7 µm Day/Night Band data (below; credit: William Straka, SSEC) — deep convection with overshooting tops could be seen in the southern quadrant eyewall region, with gravity waves propagating radially outward across the northeastern and eastern portion of the cirrus canopy.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR and 0.7 µm Day/Night Band images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR and 0.7 µm Day/Night Band images

A DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed that a prominent “moat” of warm brightness temperatures (darker blue color enhancement) existed around the center of Bansi at 14:24 UTC on 13 January. The presence of such a moat usually signifies that the secondary (outer) eyewall formation process has completed, and an eyewall replacement cycle is underway (also signalling that the period of rapid intensification has ended). The moat feature is sustained by subsidence from the eyewall secondary circulations.

DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image

DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image

Note that there was no well-defined eye evident on the conventional Meteosat-7 IR image during this eyewall replacement cycle (below).

Meteosat-7 11.5 µm IR channel and DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave images

Meteosat-7 11.5 µm IR channel and DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave images