GOES-16 Mesoscale Sectors: 30-second imagery of severe thunderstorms over the Texas Panhandle

March 28th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

The Storm Prediction Center issued a Moderate Risk for severe thunderstorms over the southern Plains on 28 March 2017. As a result, both 1-minute GOES-16 Mesoscale Sectors were positioned over that region, providing images at 30-second intervals. ABI 0.5-km resolution Visible (0.64 µm) images with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes (above; also available as a 193 Mbyte animated GIF) showed a very detailed view of the overshooting tops associated with the storms during the 2030-2359 UTC time period.

The images were centered approximately over the Lubbock (KLBB) to Midland (KMAF) to Abilene (KABI) region (below).

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) image, with station identifiers KLBB, KMAF and KABI highlighted [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) image, with station identifiers KLBB, KMAF and KABI highlighted [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Mesoscale Sectors: 1-minute imagery of severe thunderstorms in Oklahoma

March 26th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

As noted on the Satellite Liaison Blog, an outbreak of severe thunderstorms developed over parts of Oklahoma and Texas on 26 March 2017. A GOES-16 Mesoscale Sector positioned over that region provided 1-minute data — and 0.5-km resolution Visible (0.64 µm) images (above; also available as a 114-Mbyte animated GIF) showed the formation of storms that produced hail (as large as 3.25 inches in diameter, at 0043 UTC) and one tornado (at 0018 UTC) in eastern Oklahoma during the 2000 to 0045 UTC time period. SPC storm reports are plotted in red — their locations have been parallax-corrected, assuming a cloud top height of 11 km. Both of the aforementioned large hail and tornado events occurred  during the 30-minute gap in operational GOES-13 (GOES-East)  imagery from 0015 to 0045 UTC, when that satellite was executing New Day Schedule Transition and Southern Hemisphere scan duties.

GOES-16 Mesoscale Sector visible images: severe thunderstorms in Illinois/Indiana, and Tennessee/Georgia/South Carolina

March 20th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail size [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail size [click to play MP4 animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

1-minute interval 0.5-km resolution GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images (above; also available as a 130 Mbyte animated GIF) showed a cluster of thunderstorms that moved southeastward across Illinois and Indiana, producing a swath of hail as large as 2.75 inches in diameter (SPC storm reports) on 20 March 2017. The shadowing and textured signature of overshooting tops could be seen in the vicinity of many of the hail reports (hail sizes, red, are plotted in 1/100th of an inch; 275 = 2.75 inches).

On 21 March, a larger-scale outbreak of wind and hail-producing thunderstorms developed which primarily impacted parts of Tennessee, Georgia and South Carolina. Trees falling on homes were responsible for injuries and a fatality in Georgia, and hail as large as 3.0 inches occurred in South Carolina (SPC storm reports). As discussed on the Satellite Liaison Blog, the co-location of both Mesoscale Sectors provided images at 30-second intervals — GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images (below; also available as a 168 Mbyte animated GIF) again displayed very detailed cloud-top structure which included overshooting tops and gravity waves.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail (red) and wind damage (cyan) [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail (red) and wind damage (cyan) [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 visible images of a squall line moving across Virginia

March 1st, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Note: GOES-16 data shown on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing on-orbit testing.

A strong pre-cold-frontal squall line produced widespread severe weather (primarily damaging winds: SPC storm reports) across the eastern US on 01 March 2017. A GOES-16 Mesoscale Sector provided imagery at 60-second intervals during a portion of the day — and ABI 0.5-km resolution Visible (0.64 µm) images (above; also available as a 79 Mbyte animated GIF) showed the well-defined squall line cloud band as it moved across Virginia.  Behind the squall line, note the presence of semi-stationary mountain wave rotor clouds downwind of the Appalachian Mountains. A larger-scale animation is available here.