Ice dam in Lake Erie

January 19th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in yellow and wind gusts (knots) plotted in cyan [click to play animation]

Thanks to Dave Zaff (NWS Buffalo) for the email alerting us to an ice dam that had formed across the eastern portion of Lake Erie on 19 January 2018 — GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed that the northeastward drift of ice floes was effectively being blocked by this ice dam feature.

A toggle between 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS True-color and False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the MODIS Today site (below) provided a more detailed view of the Lake Erie ice dam and upwind drift ice at 1615 UTC. Snow and ice appear as shades of cyan in the False-color image, in contrast to supercooled water droplet clouds which are shades of white.

Terra MODIS True-color and False-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True-color and False-color RGB images; red arrows denote the location of the ice dam [click to enlarge]

The Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with an overlay of RTMA surface winds (below) showed the southwesterly flow across the long axis of the lake.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with surface METAR reports and RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) image with surface METAR reports and RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

A toggle between 1607 UTC Terra MODIS and 1757 UTC Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images (below) showed the motion of the lake drift ice during that time period.

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images, with METAR surface reports [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible images, with METAR surface reports [click to enlarge]

Flooding in Southern California

January 9th, 2018 |

1-minute GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images; with hourly reports of surface weather type plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

1-minute GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images; with hourly reports of surface weather type plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

An onshore flow of moisture (MIMIC TPW) in tandem with forcing for ascent with the approach of an upper-level low and a surface cold/occluded front brought heavy rainfall and some higher-elevation snowfall (NWS LOX/SGX | WPC) to much of Southern California on 09 January 2018. To help monitor the event, a GOES-16 (GOES-East) Mesoscale Sector was positioned over the region, providing images at 1-minute intervals. “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the colder clouds associated with periods of moderate to heavy rainfall. Some of this precipitation fell over burn scar areas from wildfires that occurred in December 2017 — including the Thomas fire, which was the largest on record for the state of California — resulting in numerous mud/debris slides that caused at least 17 fatalities, destroyed/damaged hundreds of homes, and closed many streets and highways.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) showed some of the features which helped produce heavier rainfall and snowfall during the daylight hours on 09 January.

1-minute GOES-16

1-minute GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images; with hourly reports of surface weather type plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

The circulation of the upper-level low was easily seen on GOES-16 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images (below).

1-minute GOES-16 Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images; with hourly reports of surface weather type plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

1-minute GOES-16 Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images; with hourly reports of surface weather type plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

===== 10 January Update =====

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color and False-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color and False-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

On the following day, a toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color and False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from RealEarth (above) showed (1) the large burn scar from the Thomas Fire (shades of reddish-brown), and (2) snow cover in the higher terrain (darker shades of cyan) on the False-color image. The True-color image revealed sediment from runoff flowing into the nearshore waters from Santa Barbara to Oxnard (shades of brown to light green).

A closer look at the Thomas Fire burn scar was provided by 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 False-color RGB imagery (below), which showed thin filaments of muddy sediment just offshore, as well as fresh snow cover (shades of cyan) along or immediately adjacent to the northeastern edge of the burn scar (in the Hines Peak area). On 10 January, the fire was listed as 92% contained (100% containment was declared on 12 January).

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

===== 11 January Update =====

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color images on 10 January and 11 January [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color images on 10 January and 11 January [click to enlarge]

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images on 10 January and 11 January (above) showed that sediment was flowing farther offshore from the Thomas Fire burn scar area.

Farther to the south, offshore sediment transport was also seen in the San Diego area (below).

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color image on 11 January [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color image on 11 January [click to enlarge]

Ice floes in Chesapeake Bay

January 7th, 2018 |

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

In the wake of the explosive cyclogenesis off the East Coast of the US on 04 January 2018, very cold air began to spread across much of the eastern half of the Lower 48 states. Focusing on the Hampton Roads area of southeastern Virginia, satellite imagery began to show the formation of ice in the rivers and bays. On 06 January, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 false-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (above) revealed some of this ice — in particular, long narrow ice floes (snow and ice appear as shades of cyan) that likely emerged from the Back River (northeast of Hampton) and were drifting northward and southward just off the coast of the Virginia Peninsula.

On the following day (07 January), 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images from the MODIS Today site (below) showed that a larger V-shaped ice floe was located just southeast of the Peninsula, with its vertex pointed toward the Hampton Roads Bridge-Tunnel (HRBT). Snow and ice also appear as shades of cyan in the MODIS false-color image.

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

07 January also happened to be the last full day of imagery to be broadcast by the GOES-13 satellite — a comparison of 1-minute Mesoscale Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) Visible (0.64 µm) and 15-30 minute interval GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images (below) showed that the V-shaped ice floe continued to drift southwestward toward the HRBT. However, it was difficult to tell whether the ice feature made it over and past the tunnel; even with the improved GOES-16 Visible spatial resolution (0.5 km at satellite sub-point, compared to 1.0 km for GOES-13) and the 1-minute rapid image scans, the ice floe became harder to track during the afternoon hours before high clouds began to overspread the region.

"GOES-16

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm, right) images, with hourly surface air temperatures (ºF) plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

However, a close examination of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color images at 1826 UTC (below) indicated that some of the ice had indeed moved westward past Fort Monroe (on the far southeastern tip of the Peninsula) and over/past the HRBT.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

On the topic of cold temperatures in southeastern Virginia, a new daily record low of -3 ºF was set at Richmond on the morning of 07 January, and at Norfolk new daily record low and record low maximum temperatures were set (10 ºF and 23 ºF, respectively).

Eastern US winter storm

January 3rd, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm, right) images, with plots of hourly surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

The initial impacts of a large Eastern US winter storm were seen in a comparison of GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images (above) on 03 January 2018 — areas of southeastern Georgia received freezing rain and/or 1-6 inches of snowfall. As clouds began to dissipate, the resulting snow cover appeared bright on the Visible images (since fresh snow is highly reflective at the 0.64 µm wavelength), and darker shades of gray on the Near-Infrared images (since snow and ice are strong absorbers of radiation at the 1.61 µm wavelength). Note the brief appearance of a cloud plume streaming southward from the Hatch Nuclear Power Plant.

Earlier that morning, the Florida Panhandle also received snowfall (text | map), but the lighter accumulations there were insufficient to exhibit a good satellite signature.

In a toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from RealEarth (below), the deeper snow cover in Georgia appears as darker shades of cyan.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color and false-color images [click to enlarge]

===== 04 January Update =====

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 0620 UTC (1:20 AM Eastern time) on 04 January (above; courtesy of William Straka, CIMSS) showed a nighttime view of the rapidly-intensifying storm when it had an estimated minimum central pressure of 972 hPa or 28.70″. Note the signature of snow cover — extending from southeastern Georgia across eastern portions of South Carolina and North Carolina — which is evident on the “visible image at night” Day/Night Band (made possible by ample illumination from the Moon, which was in the Waning Gibbous phase at 92% of Full). A full-resolution version of the Day/Night Band image is available here.

During the following daytime hours, 30-second interval Mesoscale Sector GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) showed the evolution of the low pressure center of circulation as it continued to rapidly intensify (surface analyses) off the US East Coast.

30-second GOES-16

30-second GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface weather type plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

A larger-scale view (using 5-minute CONUS sector data) of GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images with hourly plots of surface weather (above) depicted the widespread precipitation associated with the storm. Similarly, plots of hourly wind gusts (below) portrayed the large wind field of the system. Some of the highest snowfall/ice accumulations and peak wind gusts are listed here and here.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind gusts plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

In the wake of the departing storm, the tropospheric column over Florida and the southeastern US was dry enough (3.7 mm or 0.15″ at Tallahassee FL and 4.0 mm or 0.16 ” at Charleston SC) to allow the GOES-16 Lower-level (7.3 µm) Water Vapor imagery (below) to detect the thermal contrast of surface land/water boundaries — portions of the coastline and a few of the larger inland lakes were evident.

"GOES-16

(7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) images [click to play animation]” class=”size-medium” /> GOES-16 Lower-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) images [click to play animation]

A full-resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image at 1738 UTC (below) revealed interesting storm features such its very large cloud shield and convection near the circulation center, as well as the swath of snow cover across parts of Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

A toggle between the corresponding Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Snow/Ice RGB images (below) helped to highlight locations which received a significant accrual of ice from freezing rain– these areas show up as a darker shade of red on the Snow/Ice RGB image (along the southeastern edge of the swath of snow cover, which is a lighter shade of red). Notable ice accumulations included 0.50″ at Brunswick and Folkston GA, 0.25″ at Georgetown and Myrtle Beach SC, and 0.25″ at Kure Beach NC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Snow/Ice RGB images, with surface station identifiers plotted in white [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Snow/Ice RGB images, with surface station identifiers plotted in white [click to enlarge]

Finally, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 false-color RGB image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the snow-covered Charleston, South Carolina area — areas with less dense trees and vegetation showed a more pronounced snow cover signature (shades of cyan). The Charleston International Airport remained closed, due to snow and ice-covered runways.

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 false-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Additional imagery of this explosive cyclogenesis event can be found at this blog post.