Cyclone Shaheen-Gulab makes landfall in Oman

October 3rd, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 (formerly GOES-13) Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images (above) showed
Hurricane Shaheen-Gulab weakening to a Tropical Storm shortly after it made a rare landfall along the coast of Oman on 03 October 2021. The storm exhibited an eye at times as it was a Category 1 Hurricane over the Gulf of Oman. This was likely the first tropical cyclone to make landfall along that coastal portion of Oman since 1890 (Wikipedia).

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that the storm was moving through an environment of low shear.

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Suomi-NPP VIIRS True Color RGB and infrared Window (11.45 µm) images viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the Category 1 Hurricane at 0927 UTC.

Suomi-NPP VIIRS True Color RGB and infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 0927 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 is brought out of storage

August 11th, 2021 |

Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 [click to play animation | MP4]

The GOES-14 satellite was brought out of storage on 11 August 2021, for its annual checkout activities (NOAA bulletin). Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) provided a 4-GOES view of the thermal anomalies (or hot pixels, darker black enhancement) exhibited by the Richard Spring Fire in southeastern Montana. On that day the fire had burned over 149,000 acres, and was only 15% contained. The 4 panels of images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

GOES-14 Imager spectral band images at 1755 UTC on 11 July 2021 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge]

The GOES-14 Imager has the same 5 spectral bands (above) as GOES-15 (below).

GOES-15 Imager spectral band images at 1800 UTC on 11 July 2021 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge]

A sequence of Infrared images from EWS-G1 (formerly GOES-13), GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 — between 1345 UTC and 1500 UTC on 13 August — is shown below. Full-resolution data from all 5 of the GOES were received by satellite antennas operated by SSEC Satellite Data Services.

Sequence of Infrared images from EWS-G1 (formerly GOES-13), GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge | MP4]

Cyclone Tauktae in the Arabian Sea

May 16th, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Tauktae in the Arabian Sea (just off the west coast of India) as it intensified from a Category 1 to a Category 3 storm on 16 May 2021.

A DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) revealed a fully enclosed eye at 1142 UTC, shortly before Tauktae reached Category 3 intensity at 12 UTC.

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1142 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1142 UTC [click to enlarge]

===== 17 May Update =====

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EWS-G1 Infrared images (above) showed Cyclone Tauktae making landfall along the coast of India around 1745 UTC on 17 May, with a Category 3 intensity (ADT | SATCON).

Tropical Cyclone Joba makes landfall in Tanzania

April 24th, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Cyclone Jobo as it moved west-northwestward across the Indian Ocean during the 23-24 April 2021 period, eventually making landfall in Tanzania as a weakening Tropical Depression. Jobo was traversing warm sea surface temperatures during its westward trek.

A sequence of VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP as viewed using RealEarth (below) provided higher-resolution views of the various stages of convection associated with Jobo during the 22-24 April period.

VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]