Cyclone Tauktae in the Arabian Sea

May 16th, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Tauktae in the Arabian Sea (just off the west coast of India) as it intensified from a Category 1 to a Category 3 storm on 16 May 2021.

A DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) revealed a fully enclosed eye at 1142 UTC, shortly before Tauktae reached Category 3 intensity at 12 UTC.

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1142 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1142 UTC [click to enlarge]

===== 17 May Update =====

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

EWS-G1 Infrared images (above) showed Cyclone Tauktae making landfall along the coast of India around 1745 UTC on 17 May, with a Category 3 intensity (ADT | SATCON).

Tropical Cyclone Joba makes landfall in Tanzania

April 24th, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Cyclone Jobo as it moved west-northwestward across the Indian Ocean during the 23-24 April 2021 period, eventually making landfall in Tanzania as a weakening Tropical Depression. Jobo was traversing warm sea surface temperatures during its westward trek.

A sequence of VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP as viewed using RealEarth (below) provided higher-resolution views of the various stages of convection associated with Jobo during the 22-24 April period.

VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

Cyclone Habana in the South Indian Ocean

March 10th, 2021 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images (above) displayed the well-defined eye and eyewall structure of Cyclone Habana in the South Indian Ocean on 10 March 2021. This was the second period of Category 4 intensity (ADT | SATCON) during the life cycle of Habana.

Meteosat-8 Infrared images with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed that Habana was moving through an environment of relatively low shear.

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared images with an overlay of 1505 UTC Metop ASCAT winds (below) depicted a fairly uniform distribution of winds within the eyewall region, as Habana developed an annular structure.

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with a plot of Metop ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared images, with a plot of Metop ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images from DMSP-16 at 1139 UTC and DMSP-18 at 2327 UTC are shown below.

DMSP-16 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1139 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-16 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 1139 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2327 UTC [click to enlarge]

DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image at 2327 UTC [click to enlarge]

 

Cyclone Nivar makes landfall in India

November 25th, 2020 |

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]'

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

US Space Force EWS-G1 Infrared (10.7 µm) images (above) showed Category 1 Cyclone Nivar making landfall along the southeastern coast of India on 25 November 2020.

EUMETSAT Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images with contours of deep-layer wind shear from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) indicated that Nivar was moving through an environment of low shear (and over warm water) — factors favorable for the storm maintaining its intensity.

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

Meteosat-8 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]