30-second imagery of severe thunderstorms across Nebraska and Kansas

June 8th, 2019 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation | 407 MB animated GIF]

Overlapping 1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sectors provided 30-second interval GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) of severe thunderstorms (SPC storm reports) that developed across central Nebraska and northern Kansas along and ahead of an advancing frontal boundary (surface analyses) on 08 June 2019. Robust overshooting tops were very apparent with many of the storms, and a few Above-Anvil Cirrus Plumes were also seen.

The corresponding GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images are shown below. Numerous overshooting tops exhibited infrared brightness temperatures in the -70 to -75ºC range; note the appearance of a wave feature which propagated radially outward from an overshooting top in south-central Nebraska after 0030 UTC.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play MP4 animation | 159 MB animated GIF]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play MP4 animation | 159 MB animated GIF]

Lake Michigan lake breeze

June 5th, 2019 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan, temperatures plotted in yellow and SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan, temperatures plotted in yellow and SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed the formation of a lake breeze along the western shore of Wisconsin — in the wake of a cold frontal passage — on 05 June 2019. This lake breeze enhanced surface convergence, which played a role in the formation of a thunderstorm that produced hail as large as 2.50 inches in diameter when a prominent overshooting top was evident (NWS Green Bay).

The lake breeze also caused sharp drops in surface air temperature — from low 80s to middle 50s F — along with fog reducing visibility to 0.5 mile or less at Milwaukee and Racine in southeastern Wisconsin (below). The arrival of lake breeze fog also restricted the visibility to 0.5 mile or less at Waukegan in northeastern Illinois.

Time series plot of surface reports from Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport [click to enlarge]

Time series plot of surface report data from Milwaukee Mitchell International Airport [click to enlarge]

Time series plot of surface reports from Racine Batten International Airport [click to enlarge]

Time series plot of surface report data from Racine Batten International Airport [click to enlarge]

Mesoscale vortex along the Texas coast

June 5th, 2019 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) revealed a mesoscale vortex near the Texas coast (in the general vicinity of Houston) on 05 June 2019. This could have been a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV), but there is evidence to suggest that it was a remnant circulation of what was Tropical Invest 91L a few days earlier.

Using a 3-hourly 850 hPa Relative Vorticity product from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below), the northward migration of vorticity associated with Invest 91L could be followed from the Bay of Campeche on 02 June to the Texas coast on 05 June.

850 hPa Relative Vorticity product, from 00 UTC on 02 June to 00 UTC on 06 June 2019 [click to play animation]

850 hPa Relative Vorticity product, from 00 UTC on 02 June to 00 UTC on 06 June 2019 [click to play animation]

Severe thunderstorms in Minnesota

June 4th, 2019 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed a mesoscale convective system (MCS) that produced large hail and damaging winds — including gusts to 85 mph around 2120 UTC — across southern Minnesota on 04 June 2019 (SPC storm reports). Numerous well-defined overshooting tops were seen in the imagery, along with cloud-top gravity waves across the western portion of the MCS anvil.

The corresponding GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (below) revealed overshooting tops with infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -70ºC — which corresponded to an air parcel rising to altitude around 13 km according to 18 UTC rawinsonde data from Chanhassen, Minnesota.

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with SPC Storm Reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]