Typhoon Soulik in the northwest Pacific Ocean

August 20th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 AHI Band 13 Clean Window (10.4 µm) imagery, 0900-1400 UTC on 18 August 2018 (Click to animate)

Typhoon Soulik, south of Japan and moving westward, has acquired a very large eye — almost 100 miles across! Himawari-8 imagery, above (courtesy JMA), shows the evolution and enlargement of the eye between 0900 and 1400 UTC on 20 August 2018.

GCOM, Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 all passed over Soulik between 1600 and 1715 UTC on 18 August. The Infrared Toggle, below, from NOAA-20 (1608 UTC) and Suomi NPP (1658 UTC) also shows a large eye.

NOAA-20 (1608 UTC) and Suomi NPP (1658 UTC) 11.45 µm Infrared Imagery of Soulik on 18 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Day Night Band Imagery from Suomi NPP, below, also shows a large eye. There was little lunar illumination occurring at the time because the moon was below the horizon.

Suomi NPP Day Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) Imagery over Soulik, 1658 UTC on 18 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

GCOM overflew Soulik at 1702 UTC, and the AMSR-2 instrument on board gave estimates of rain rate, both convective and a the surface. Those are toggled below.

GCOM AMSR-2 Microwave estimates of Precipitation over Soulik, 1702 UTC on 18 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

(Suomi NPP, NOAA-20 and GCOM imagery courtesy William Straka, CIMSS)

Soulik’s eye was wide enough that a NUCAPS soundings retrieval (Click here for more information on NUCAPS soundings) could be made from data collected during a Suomi-NPP overpass at 0350 UTC on 21 August 2018.  Note the green sounding location within Soulik’s eye — Green dots denote regions where the infrared retrieval was successful.  The sounding at that point is shown below. (NUCAPS imagery courtesy Landon Aydlett, WFO Guam).

Suomi NPP NUCAPS sounding locations at 0350 UTC on 21 August 2018 on top of AHI 10.4 µm Clean Window imagery (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP NUCAPS Sounding within the eye of Soulik at 0350 UTC on 21 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

You can use NUCAPS Soundings to diagnose the difference between the environment in the storm eye, and in the surrounding environment. The animation below shows locations of 5 soundings, one in the Eye, and one north, east, south and west of the CDO.  The five selected soundings are shown at the bottom, with insets showing which sounding is which.  The sounding in the eye shows remarkable warmth, as expected.

Suomi NPP NUCAPS Sounding Points overlain on a Day Night Band Image, ~0350 UTC on 21 August 2018 (Click to enlarge). Sounding locations are indicated.

NUCAPS Soundings in and around Typhoon Soulik at the locations indicated, ~0350 UTC on 21 August 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Soulik’s path is projected to remain south of Japan and approach the Korean Peninsula by mid-week. For more information on Soulik, consult the CIMSS/SSEC Tropical Weather Website, or the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.

Super Typhoon Maria

July 5th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Typhoon Maria underwent a period of rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON) while it was just northwest of Guam late in the day on 05 July 2018, becoming the first Category 5 Super Typhoon of the 2018 West Pacific season. Rapid-scan Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Maria during this period of rapid intensification. Cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures reached -80ºC (violet enhancement) at times in the eyewall of the storm.

A GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed the pinhole eye of Maria around the time it reached Category 5 intensity. The tropical cyclone was moving over water with high values of Ocean Heat Content — and was in an environment characterized by low values of Deep-layer Wind Shear.

GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

Mesovortices could be seen within the eye on Himawari-8 Visible imagery (below). However, note how the eye became less distinct and increased in diameter toward the end of the animation.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Shortly after 00 UTC on 06 July, Maria began the process of an eyewall replacement cycle as shown in MIMIC TC morphed microwave imagery (below) — and during the following 6-12 hours a decreasing trend in storm intensity was seen (ADT | SATCON).

MIMIC TC morphed microwave image product [click to play animation]

MIMIC TC morphed microwave image product [click to play animation]

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1603 UTC on 06 July (below; courtesy of William Straka, CIMSS) showed Category 4 Typhoon Maria after the eye had filled following the eyewall replacement cycle.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

===== 08 July Update =====

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Super Typhoon Maria re-intensified to Category 5 intensity at 12 UTC on 08 July (SATCON) — Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) displayed a large (30 nautical mile wide) eye. The subtle signature of mesovortices could be seen rotating within the eye.

During the preceding daylight hours, Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) showed the eye mesovortices in better detail.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

However, Maria was again downgraded to a Category 4 storm at 00 UTC on 09 July, as another eyewall replacement cycle took place (DMSP-17 microwave image) and the storm began to move over water having slightly cooler Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Heat Content. The eye and its mesovortices continued to be prominent in Himawari-8 Visible and Infrared imagery (below).

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Kilauea effects stretch to Guam

June 1st, 2018 |

Suomi-NPP Views of the eastern tip of the island of Hawai’i at 1155 UTC on 1 June 2018. VIIRS Day Night Band Visible (0.70) and Shortwave Infrared (3.75) and Longwave Infrared (11.45) (Click to enlarge)

Early on 1 June 2018, clear skies allowed an unobstructed view of the still-erupting Kilauea from Suomi-NPP. (Orbit paths from this link).   The image above steps through the Day Night Band 0.7 µm Visible Image, the 3.75 µm Shortwave Infrared, and the 11.45 µm Longwave Infrared. The warm signatures of the lava extend all the way into the ocean.


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Photo showing Volcanic Haze on the Island of Guam (photo courtesy Brandon Aydlett, NWS GUM)

On 30 May 2018, hazy skies were widespread over the Mariana Islands, haze that could be traced back to Hawaii. (The picture above looks northeast from Nimitz Hill on the island of Guam).

The visible imagery below shows a pall of haze entrenched within the tropical easterlies from south and west of Hawai’i all the way across the Pacific Basin to Guam — a distance of some 4000 miles! (Himawari imagery courtesy Brandon Aydlett, NWS GUM, where the National Weather Service day begins!)

Himawari-8 Band 3 (0.64 µm) Imagery on Wednesday 30 May 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Minor explosive eruption of Kilauea in Hawai’i

May 19th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product {click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product [click to play animation]

An explosive eruption from the Halema’uma’u crater at the Kilauea summit on the Big Island of Hawai’i occurred around 1550 UTC on 19 May 2018. Using Himawari-8 data, multispectral retrievals of parameters such as Ash Cloud Height (above) and Ash Loading (below) from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site helped to characterize the volcanic ash plume.

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Later in the day, a Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the hazy signature of volcanic smog or “vog” which had spread out to the south, southwest and west of the Big Island. Light amounts of ash fall were reported downwind of Kilauea.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]