GOES-14 SRSOR: Mesoscale Convective Vortex in the Southern Mississippi Valley

August 18th, 2014
GOES-14 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-14 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

The GOES-14 satellite was in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) mode providing 1-minute imagery over the eastern US on 18 August 2014. From the late morning into the afternoon hours, 0.63 µm visible channel images (above; click image to play animation; also available as an MP4 movie file or a YouTube video) revealed a large and well-defined mesoscale convective vortex (MCV) propagating eastward across northern Mississippi. This MCV was spawned from a thunderstorm which rapidly developed over far southwestern Arkansas during the preceding nighttime hours (beginning around 06:15 UTC: GOES-13 IR images).

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR channel images (below) showed the rapid growth of the parent thunderstorm from 07:18 UTC to 08:59 UTC. The coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperatures were -80º C.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR channel images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR channel images

One Response to “GOES-14 SRSOR: Mesoscale Convective Vortex in the Southern Mississippi Valley”

  1. Anton says:

    America has a different natural activities and recognized as enough dangerous place in seismological sense. You have different sleeping supevolcanos, tornados, hurricanes and so on so Americans must have good instruments of notification of danger. You can prevent the possible disaster but you can avoid it and that`s cool that a satellite can help you in this research.

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