Calfor Fire in California

August 17th, 2021 |
Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 [click to play animation | MP4]

Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 [click to play animation | MP4]

The Caldor Fire (east of Sacramento, California) exhibited unprecedented growth on 17 August 2021 — increasing from 3600 acres burned in the morning to 30,000 acres that evening, with 0% containment — and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from 1-minute GOES-17, 15 to 30-minute GOES-15, 15 to 30-minute GOES-14 and 5-minute GOES-16 (above) displayed a rapid expansion of the fire’s thermal anomaly (large cluster of hot pixels, darker black enhancement; the white pixels seen in GOES-15 images were due to a “wrap-around” effect with that satellite’s saturated 3.9 µm detectors). Each of the 4 image panels are displayed in the native projection of that particular satellite.

GOES-17 True Color RGB images created using Geo2Grid  (below) showed the large amounts of smoke (and frequent pyrocumulus clouds) produced by the Caldor Fire.  

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Tropical Storm Fred makes landfall in Florida

August 16th, 2021 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1–minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Storm Fred during the 8-hour period leading up to it making landfall along the panhandle of Florida around 1915 UTC on 16 August 2021. Multiple convective bursts developed near the storm center, with some exhibiting cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -80ºC or colder (violet pixels). As Fred moved inland, it produced heavy rainfall and strong winds.

A time-matched comparison of Infrared images from GOES-16 and Suomi NPP at 1831 UTC is shown below. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were -74.1ºC with GOES-16 and -79.5ºC with Suomi NPP. The spatial offset is due to parallax that is inherent with GOES imagery. 

1831 UTC Infrared Window images from GOES-16 (10.35 µm) and Suomi NPP (11.45 µm) [click to enlarge]

Views of Fred from 4 GOES (GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16) around 1800 UTC are shown below. 

Infrared Window images of Tropical Storm Fred from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 around 1800 UTC (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click top enlarge]

     

Day 32 of the Dixie Fire in California, as viewed from 5 satellites

August 13th, 2021 |

Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 [click to play animation | MP4]

The Dixie Fire (which had grown to become the largest on record for the state of California) began burning on 13 July 2021 — and on 13 August 2021, Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from 1-minute GOES-17, 15 to 30-minute GOES-15, 15-to 30-minute GOES-14 and 5-minute GOES-16 (above) showed the thermal signature (darker red to black pixels) during the 1200 UTC – 1801 UTC period. The images were displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

Although there was smoke and some clouds across the area at the time of the Suomi NPP overpass, the VIIRS False Color RGB image provided a good view of most of the fire’s large burn scar (shades of red to brown). On this day, the fire had burned nearly 518,000 acres, and was 31% contained.

Suomi NPP VIIRS False Color RGB and True Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 is brought out of storage

August 11th, 2021 |

Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 [click to play animation | MP4]

The GOES-14 satellite was brought out of storage on 11 August 2021, for its annual checkout activities (NOAA bulletin). Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) provided a 4-GOES view of the thermal anomalies (or hot pixels, darker black enhancement) exhibited by the Richard Spring Fire in southeastern Montana. On that day the fire had burned over 149,000 acres, and was only 15% contained. The 4 panels of images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

GOES-14 Imager spectral band images at 1755 UTC on 11 July 2021 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge]

The GOES-14 Imager has the same 5 spectral bands (above) as GOES-15 (below).

GOES-15 Imager spectral band images at 1800 UTC on 11 July 2021 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge]

A sequence of Infrared images from EWS-G1 (formerly GOES-13), GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 — between 1345 UTC and 1500 UTC on 13 August — is shown below. Full-resolution data from all 5 of the GOES were received by satellite antennas operated by SSEC Satellite Data Services.

Sequence of Infrared images from EWS-G1 (formerly GOES-13), GOES-17, GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-16 (credit: Tim Schmit, NOAA/NESDIS/ASPB) [click to enlarge | MP4]