Lake effect cloud plume formation over the Great Salt Lake

April 4th, 2017 |

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-16 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-13 (0.63 µm, right), with hourly surface reports plotted in yellow [click to play animation]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-16 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-13 (0.63 µm, right), with hourly surface reports plotted in yellow [click to play animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

As discussed in more detail on the VISIT Meteorological Interpretation Blog, a small lake effect cloud plume formed over the southern portion  of the Great Salt Lake in northern Utah on 04 February 2017. A comparison of early morning Visible images from the GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-16 and GOES-13 (GOES-East) satellites (above; also available as an MP4 animation) showed the advantage of improved spatial and temporal resolution provided by the GOES-16 0.64 µm “Red visible” band for depicting the evolution of this feature (which was responsible for some brief inland snow showers). The images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

Several hours prior to the formation of the lake effect cloud band, the MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product (below) indicated that mid-lake water temperatures were as warm as 48ºF.

MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

Fog/stratus dissipation: 1-minute GOES-16 vs 15-30 minute GOES-13

April 4th, 2017 |

GOES-16 0.64 µm Visible (left) and GOES-13 0.63 µm Visible (right) images, with surface reports of fog plotted in yellow [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64µm, left) and GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm, right) images, with surface reports of fog plotted in yellow [click to play animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

Widespread fog and stratus had developed across southern Alabama and western Georgia during the pre-dawn hours on 04 April 2017. After sunrise, a comparison of 1-minute interval GOES-16 and 15-30 minute interval GOES-13 visible imagery (above) demonstrated the advantage of more frequent scans to monitor the dissipation of fog and stratus. The improved spatial resolution of the GOES-16 0.64 µm “Red visible” band — 0.5 km at satellite sub-point, vs 1 km for GOES-13 — also aided in the detection of smaller-scale river valley fog features.