Sir Ivan Fire pyroCumulonimbus in New South Wales, Australia

February 12th, 2017

Himawari-8 0.64 µm Visible (top), 3.9 µm Shortwave Infrared (middle) and 10.4 µm Longwave Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 0.64 µm Visible (top), 3.9 µm Shortwave Infrared (middle) and 10.4 µm Longwave Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above / MP4 ; zoomed-in over fire source region: GIF / MP4) showed wildfires burning in New South Wales, Australia on 12 February 2017. The larger Sir Ivan Fire near Dunedoo produced a pyroCumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud, which first cooled below the -40ºC Longwave Infrared brightness temperature “pyroCb threshold” at 0530 UTC (-47ºC) and quickly reached its minimum temperature of -56.6ºC at 0540 UTC. An animation of Himawari-8 true-color images is available here (courtesey of Dan Lindsey, RAMMB/CIRA).

Consecutive true-color images from Suomi NPP VIIRS (0402 UTC) and Aqua MODIS (0405 UTC) viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the large smoke plume about 1.5 hours prior to pyroCb development.

Suomi NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS true-color images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS and Aqua MODIS true-color images [click to enlarge]

A high fire danger was well-anticipated across this portion of Australia:

Some ground-based photos of the pyroCb cloud:


Northeast US winter storm

February 9th, 2017

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with surface fronts and MSLP pressure [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with surface fronts and MSLP pressure [click to play animation]

A strong winter storm impacted much of the Northeast US on 09 February 2017, dropping up to 24 inches of snow in Maine and producing wind gusts of 70 mph in Massachusetts (WPC storm summary). GOES-13 (GOES-East) Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images with surface fronts and Mean Sea Level Pressure (above) showed the rapid intensification of the mid-latitude cyclone.

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Visible images (above) and Water Vapor images (below) with hourly surface weather symbols revealed the extent of thunderstorms in the south and heavy snow in the north. A number of sites in New England also reported thundersnow.

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 Âm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 Âm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols [click to play animation]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (below) provided a high-resolution snapshot of the storm at 1708 UTC. Note the areas of banded convective elements both south of the storm center over the Atlantic, and also inland over parts of New England.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, with surface fronts and MSLP [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, with surface fronts and MSLP [click to enlarge]

===== 10 February Update =====

Terra and Aqua MODIS false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra and Aqua MODIS false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

As the storm moved northward over Newfoundland and Labrador in eastern Canada on 10 February, a toggle between Terra (1601 UTC) and Aqua (1743 UTC) MODIS false-color “snow/cloud discrimination” Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images (above) showed the extent of the snow cover (darker shades of red), although supercooled water droplet clouds (shades of white) persisted over many areas at the times of the 2 images. Glaciated ice crystal clouds also appeared as shades of red.

Snowfall totals in the Canadian Maritimes were as high as 38 cm (15 inches).


Shamal Wind event across the Arabian Peninsula

February 5th, 2017

Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images [click to play animation]

Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images [click to play animation]

A Shamal Wind event affected the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula during the first few days of February 2017, as a strong cold front moved southward across the region. Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images (source: RealEarth) during the 31 January – 05 February period (above) showed blowing dust eventually moving off the coast of Yemen and Oman and across the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea (note the cold frontal arc clouds on 03 February). The strong Shamal winds on 03 February forced a suspension in the Dubai Desert Classic golf tournament the cancellation of Stage 4 of the Tour of Dubai bicycle race (Dubai meteorogram).

The cold air associated with the Shamal wind was especially evident at locations along the Persian Gulf during the 01-04 February period (below) — for example, the daily maximum temperature at  Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates on 01 February was 31ºC (88ºF), while it was only 18ºC (64ºF) on 03 February. At Doha in Qatar, their minimum temperature was 9ºC (48ºF) — their all-time minimum is 4ºC (39ºF). Snow fell in the Oman / United Arab Emirates border lands, with 10 cm (3.9 inches) reported at Jabal Jais. In addition to Abu Dhabi, blowing dust/sand also restricted surface visibility to 2 miles or less at locations such as Abumusa Island and Fujairah.

Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images, with METAR surface observations [click to enlarge]

Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images, with METAR surface observations [click to enlarge]

Atmospheric river events bring heavy precipitation to California

January 13th, 2017

MIMIC Total Precipatable Water product [click to play MP4 animation]

MIMIC Total Precipatable Water product [click to play MP4 animation]

A series of 3 atmospheric river events brought heavy rainfall and heavy snowfall to much of California during the first 10 days of January 2017 (NWS San Francisco/Monterey | WeatherMatrix blog). Hourly images of the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (above; also available as a 33 Mbyte animated GIF) showed the second and third of these atmospheric river events during the 06 January11 January 2017 period, which were responsible for the bulk of the heavy precipitation; these 2 events appear to have drawn moisture northeastward from the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ)..

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Near-Infrared

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (2.1 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A relatively cloud-free day on 13 January provided a good view of the Sacramento Valley and San Francisco Bay regions. A comparison of Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Near-Infrared  “Snow/Ice” (2.1 µm) images (above) showed that snow cover in the higher terrain of the Coastal Ranges and the Sierra Nevada appeared darker in the Snow/Ice band image (since snow and ice are strong absorbers of radiation at the 2.1 µm wavelength) — but water is an even stronger absorber, and therefore appeared even darker (which allowed the areas of flooding along the Sacramento River and its tributaries to be easily identified). A similar type of 1.6 µm Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” Band imagery will be available from the ABI instrument on the GOES-R series, beginning with GOES-16.

Better detail of the flooded areas of the Sacramento River and its tributaries was seen in 250-meter resolution false-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) imagery from the MODIS Today site — water appears as darker shades of blue, while snow appears as shades of cyan (in contrast to supercooled water droplet clouds, which appear as shades of white). In the corresponding MODIS true-color image, rivers and bays with high amounts of turbidity (tan shades) were evident; the offshore flow of sediment from a few rivers could also be seen.

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color RGB images [click to enlarge]