GOES-14 in SRSO-R Mode

August 10th, 2015 |

GOES-14 Visible (0.62 µm) Imagery  [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.62 µm) Imagery [click to play animation]

GOES-14 is again in SRSO-R (Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R) mode, affording the opportunity for 1-minute imagery over select regions of the United States. Information on the daily activity is available here; SRSO-R will continue through 21 August and serves as a reminder of the kind of routine scanning abilities that will be available when GOES-R is operational.

The images above, from the morning of 10 August, show a variety of features (thunderstorms over the Piedmont of South Carolina, North Carolina and Virginia, wave clouds over the high terrain of North Carolina, river valley fog in northern West Virginia and western Pennsylvania, fog in southern Vermont, etc.). High temporal resolution allows a better understanding of the cloud behavior.

As solar heating increased toward mid-day and the atmosphere became more unstable, clusters of convection developed over parts of the Great Lakes region as seen in the MP4 animation below. One of the thunderstorms (which developed in eastern Wisconsin ahead of an approaching cold front) produced 1.75-inch diameter hail, and a brief EF0 tornado (SPC storm reports); not far to the south, a thunderstorm wind gust of 44 mph and 1.10 inches of rainfall in 30 minutes occurred at Milwaukee International Airport (Local Storm Reports). The MP4 movie file is also available as a very large (197 Mbyte) animated GIF.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

Over the Southeast US, widespread damaging wind reports resulted from strong thunderstorms forming ahead of a Mesoscale Convective Vortex that was moving southeastward across the Tennessee River Valley region (SPC Mesoscale Discussion). The GOES-14 visible images below vividly displayed the complex nature of the convection associated with this feature. The MP4 movie file is also available as a very large (87 Mbyte) animated GIF.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

In the Northeast US, the GOES-14 visible images below showed convective development which was being aided by boundary layer convergence along a weak trough axis (surface analysis). 1.00-inch diameter hail was reported at Franklin in Upstate New York at 2035 UTC, and damaging winds were reported in Victor, New York at 2002 UTC and then again in Lyons, New York at 2129 UTC. The MP4 movie file is also available as a very large (59 Mbyte) animated GIF.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

To access realtime GOES-14 1-minute data directly, click here or here.

One of the things SRSO-R supports is the 2015 Summer Experiment at the Aviation Weather Center. For more information on that experiment, click here.

One Response to “GOES-14 in SRSO-R Mode”

  1. Rob Dale says:

    Thanks for the update! I’m having problems with the zoom using Chrome. If I click zoom it shifts the image to the left side of the box, but doesn’t zoom. I can click and drag it around, but no zoom. I tried to open it in IE10 and it says this is not a compliant browser – but I’m sure it is?

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