Eruption of Mount Sinabung volcano

February 19th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 RGB images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 RGB images [click to play animation]

An explosive eruption of Mount Sinabung began at 0153 UTC on 19 February 2018. Himawari-8 False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (above) showed the primary plume of high-altitude ash moving northwestward, with ash at lower altitudes spreading out to the south and southeast of the volcano.

Mutli-spectral retrievals of Ash Cloud Height (below) indicated that the explosive eruption injected volcanic ash to altitudes generally within the 12-18 km range, possibly reaching heights of 18-20 km. Advisories issued by the Darwin VAAC listed the ash height at 45,000 feet (13.7 km).

Himawari-8 Ash Height product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Height product [click to play animation]

Ash Loading values (below) were also very high within the high-altitude portion of the plume.

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

The Ash Effective Radius product (below) indicated that very large particles were present in the portion of the plume immediately downwind of the eruption site.

Himawari-8 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Effective Radius product [click to play animation]

In a comparison of Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (below), note the very pronounced warm thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (large cluster of red pixels) on the 0150 UTC image — Himawari-8 was actually scanning that location at 01:54:31 UTC, just after the 0153 UTC eruption. Prior to the main eruption (beginning at 0120 UTC), a very narrow volcanic cloud — likely composed primarily of condensed steam — was seen streaming rapidly southward from the volcano summit.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

The coldest Himawari-8 cloud-top infrared brightness temperature was -73 ºC at 0300 UTC, which roughly corresponded to an altitude of 15 km on nearby WIMM (Medan) rawinsonde data at 00 UTC (below).

Medan, Indonesia rawinsonde data at 00 UTC on 19 February [click to enlarge]

Medan, Indonesia rawinsonde data at 00 UTC on 19 February [click to enlarge]

A Terra MODIS True-color RGB image viewed using RealEarth is shown below. The actual time of the Terra satellite overpass was 0410 UTC.

Terra MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

An animation of Himawari-8 True-color RGB images can be seen here.

Eruption of Volcán de Fuego in Guatemala

February 1st, 2018 |

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm, top), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm, middle) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, bottom) images [click to animate]

After a series of occasional weak emissions during the previous month, a small eruption of Volcán de Fuego began during the pre-dawn hours on 01 February 2018. The thermal anomaly or “hot spot” could be seen on GOES-16 (GOES-East) Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above). In terms of the two Near-Infrared bands, even though the 1.61 µm band has better spatial resolution (1 km at satellite sub-point), the 2-km resolution 2.24 µm band is spectrally located closer to the peak emitted radiance of very hot features such as active volcanoes or large fires.

Multi-spectral retrievals of Ash Cloud Height from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (below) indicated that volcanic ash extended to altitudes in the 4-6 km range (yellow to green enhancement), with isolated 7 km pixels at 1315 UTC. The product also showed the effect of a burst of southwesterly winds just after 11 UTC, which began to transport some of the ash northeastward (as mentioned in the 1332 UTC advisory).

GOES-16 Ash Height product [click to animate]

GOES-16 Ash Height product [click to animate]

At 1624 UTC, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the primary ash plume drifting to the west, with some lower-altitude ash spreading out northward and southward. A thermal anomaly was also evident at the summit of the volcano.

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Eruption of the Mayon Volcano in the Philippines

January 22nd, 2018 |

Himawari-8 False-color RGB images [click to animate]

Himawari-8 False-color RGB images [click to animate]

The first in a renewed series of eruptions of the Mayon Volcano in the Philippines began around 0450 UTC on 22 January 2018. As seen in Himawari-8 False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (above), the ash cloud was transported to the northwest.

Multi-spectral retrievals of the Ash Cloud Height (below) indicated that the ash reached altitudes of at least 10 km (dark blue).

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product [click to animate]

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product [click to animate]

A plot of rawinsonde data from nearby Legaspi at 00 UTC on 22 January (below) indicated that the 10 km altitude corresponded to a pressure of 285 hPa.

Plot of rawinsonde data from Legaspi, Philippines [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Legaspi, Philippines [click to enlarge]

A Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image from RealEarth (below) revealed some of the lower-altitude ash (shades of tan to brown) drifting toward the west at the satellite overpass time of 0507 UTC. Thermal anomalies — signatures of hot lava flows — are indicated by red dots.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Eruption of the Bezymianni volcano

December 20th, 2017 |

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images and Ash Cloud Height product [click to play animation]

The Bezymianni volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula erupted at 0345 UTC on 20 December 2017 — an animation of Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images and retrieved Ash Cloud Height product from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (above) indicated that the ash reached heights of 18 km (the Tokyo VAAC estimated the ash height to be 50,000 feet or 15.2 km).

An oblique view using GOES-15 (GOES-West) Visible (0.63 µm) images (below) provided a different perspective of the volcanic cloud immediately following the eruption. The surface report from Shemya (PASY), located in the far western portion of Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, is plotted in the lower right corner of the images.

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]