Undular bore in the southern High Plains

July 10th, 2019 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) and Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) and Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images (above) showed the southward propagation of an undular bore across Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas on 10 July 2019. This feature appeared to play a role in convective initiation over the Texas Panhandle — and this thunderstorm produced hail and strong winds (SPC storm reports).

GOES-17 HBT Flush

July 10th, 2019 |

GOES-17 "Red Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Approximately once every 239 days, a HBT (Hydrazine Bipropellant Thruster) Flush is performed on GOES-R series satellites — this flushing burn limits the build-up of ferric nitrate in the HBT valves. Following a GOES-17 (GOES-West) HBT Flush that was conducted on 10 July 2019, a navigation offset of about 145 km was seen in 3 consecutive PACUS sector scans and in 2 consecutive Full Disk scans (immediately after the 10-minute image outage during the flush procedure) — a 5-minute PACUS sector view of Baja California using “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images is shown above, and a 10-minute Full Disk sector view of thermal anomalies associated with wildfires in Alaska using Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images is shown below.

GOES-17 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Additional information on the HBT can be found in the GOES-R Series Data Book.