GOES-14 is brought out of storage

July 31st, 2019 |

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 was brought out of storage on 31 July 2019, for its annual week of Image Navigation and Registration (INR) testing and a North/South station-keeping maneuver — the first few hours of Full Disk Visible (0.63 µm) images are shown above. The SSEC Satellite Data Services group was able to position a spare rooftop antenna to receive the GOES-14 data during this test.

A closer look at the southwestern portion of Hudson Bay (below) revealed a large and anomalously-late area of First-year ice off the coast of Ontario.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to enlarge]

In addition to the Imager, the GOES-14 Sounder is also operating. Recall that the sounder provides 18 infrared spectral bands and one visible band (below). A combined image showing both the Sounder and Imager bands has been generated.

Sample GOES-14 multi-spectral image

GOES-14 Sounder mult-spectral animation from August 1, 2019 [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Sounder imagery are being posted in near real-time during this annual test.

===== 01 August Update =====

GOES-14 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) revealed the warm thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (darker red to black pixels) resulting from a natural gas explosion and fire in central Kentucky on 01 August (blog post).

Hurricane Erick in the East Pacific Ocean

July 30th, 2019 |

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) showed the well-defined eye of Hurricane Erick on 30 July 2019. Mesovortices could be seen within the eye on the visible imagery, along with periodic convective bursts within the surrounding eyewall region — and cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -84ºC were associated with these convective bursts.

Prior to sunrise Erick experienced a period of rapid intensification, as seen in a Advanced Dvorak Technique plot from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below). Erick was classified as a Category 4 hurricane as of the 18 UTC advisory.

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) plot for Hurricane Erick [click to enlarge]

Advanced Dvorak Technique (ADT) plot for Hurricane Erick [click to enlarge]

Around the time that the period of rapid intensification was beginning, a NOAA-20 VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) image viewed using RealEarth (below) revealed a distinct eye around 11 UTC.

NOAA-20 VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) image [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) image [click to enlarge]

Milepost 97 Fire in southwestern Oregon

July 26th, 2019 |

GOES-17 Fire Temperature RGB,

GOES-17 Fire Temperature RGB, “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), CIMSS Natural Color RGB and Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

An animation that cycles through GOES-17 (GOES-West) Fire Temperature Red-Green-Blue (RGB), “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), CIMSS Natural Color RGB and Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB images (above) showed the thermal anomaly (darker red pixels) and smoke associated with the Milepost 97 Fire in southwestern Oregon on 26 July 2019. In this particular case, dense smoke appeared as darker shades of green in the Day Cloud Phase Distinction RGB images.

A time series of surface data from Sexton Summit (immediately downwind of the fire) indicated that smoke reduced the surface visibility at that location to 1/4 mile at times; farther from the fire, the visibility was in the 2-3 mile range at times in Medford (below).

Time series of surface data from Sexton Summit [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface data from Sexton Summit [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface data from Rogue Valley International Airport in Medford [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface data from Rogue Valley International Airport in Medford [click to enlarge]

===== 27 July Update =====

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 True Color RGB images from the AOS site (above) showed the increased coverage of smoke from the Milepost 97 Fire, spreading across southern Oregon and into Northern California on 27 July. Some of the smoke had been lofted to higher altitudes, being transported as far northeastward as Montana.

Later in the day, GOES-17 True Color RGB images showed that the smoke had moved a significant distance southward along and just off the California coast (below).

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 True Color RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

Monsoon moisture and thunderstorms across the Southwest US

July 25th, 2019 |

GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

The GOES-16 Total Precipitable Water product (above) highlighted the northward surge of monsoon moisture across portions of the Southwest US on 25 July 2019. TPW values as high as 2.0-2.1 inches were seen over the California/Arizona border early in the day, and also over far southeastern California and southwestern Arizona later in the day. The TPW value of 1.56 inches as derived from 12 UTC Las Vegas rawinsonde data was a record maximum for 25 July (below)and the TPW value of 1.76 inches at Phoenix was above the 90th percentile of the climatological average for the date.

Plot of Total Precipitable Water climatology for Las Vegas, Nevada [click to enlarge]

Plot of Total Precipitable Water climatology for Las Vegas, Nevada [click to enlarge]

Overlapping GOES-17 (GOES-West) Mesoscale Domain Sectors provided imagery at 30-second intervals from 1445-2100 UTC — and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) showed the development of thunderstorms across the region during that period. Many of these storms produced heavy rainfall, prompting the issuance of numerous Flash Flood Warnings in California, Nevada and Arizona (with a Dust Storm Advisory being issued due to thunderstorm outflow in Arizona).

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]