Hail-producing thunderstorm in South Dakota

August 26th, 2018 |
Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right), with SPC storm reports plotted in yellow [click to play animation | MP4]

 * GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational *

A comparison of Visible images from GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-17 and GOES-16 (GOES-East) (above) showed a severe thunderstorm that developed ahead of an advancing cold front (surface analyses) in central South Dakota late in the day on 26 August 2018. This storm produced hail as large as 4.0 inches in diameter (SPC storm reports), and also exhibited an above anvil cirrus plume (AACP) which is a signature often associated with severe thunderstorms.

The images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite, with no re-mapping. Note the important differences due to satellite scan strategy — the GOES-15 imager was initially performing a Full Disk scan, so imagery was only available every 30 minutes; the GOES-17 ABI was scanning at the standard “CONUS Sector” 5 minute interval; a GOES-16 ABI Mesoscale Domain Sector was providing images every 1 minute.