Eruptions of Kilauea in Hawai’i

May 5th, 2018 |

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Heightened seismic activity of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawai’i had been ongoing since April 2018, but increased further in early May leading to a series of minor eruptions (Hawaiian Volcano Observatory | USGS) — and GOES-15 (GOES-West) Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the nearly persistent thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (dark black to red enhancement) during the 03-05 May period. Among the numerous earthquakes, the strongest was an M6.9 which occurred at 2233 UTC on 04 May.

A nighttime image of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) data viewed using RealEarth (below) revealed the bright glow from Kilauea, and also from the Leilani Estates subdivision where several fissure vents had opened (forcing some evacuations).

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day.Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with the island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band images from 03 May and 04 May (below) showed the before/after difference in the bright signal emitted by the fissure vents near Leilani Estates.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

===== 06 May Update =====

Eruptions of fissure vents became more continuous in the Leilani Estates subdivision on 06 May. A comparison of GOES-15 Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) showed a long volcanic plume streaming southwestward, with robust thermal anomaly activity at the plume source.

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/G15_VIS_SWIR_HI_06MAY2018_960x640_B12_2018126_201500_0002PANELS_00002.GIF

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image (below) provided a more detailed view of the volcanic plume at 0007 UTC on 07 May. Note the cluster of red thermal anomalies in the vicinity of the Leilani Estates subdivision (the source of the plume).

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image, with VIIRS thermal anomalies plotted in red [click to enlarge]

Cyclone Kelvin makes landfall in Australia

February 18th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome, Australia [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Kelvin as it made landfall in Western Australia as a Category 1 storm on 18 February 2018. Kelvin continued to intensify shortly after making landfall, with estimated winds of 80 gusting to 100 knots — and a distinct eye feature could be seen in the Visible and Infrared imagery (as well as Broome radar data).

A longer animation of Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (below) revealed a very large convective burst as Kelvin meandered near the coast early on 17 February — periodic cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -90 ºC or colder were seen. After making landfall, the eye structure eventually deteriorated by 18 UTC on 18 February.

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

The MIMIC-TC product (below) showed the development of Kelvin’s compact eye during the 17 February – 18 February period; the eye was well-defined around the time of landfall (2147 UTC image on 17 February), and persisted for at least 18 hours (1556 UTC image on 18 February) until rapidly dissipating by 21 UTC.

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Deep Layer Wind Shear values remained very low — generally 5 knots or less — prior to, during and after the landfall of Kelvin, which also contributed to the slow rate of weakening. In addition, an upward moisture flux from the warm/wet sandy soil of that region helped Kelvin to intensify after landfall; land surface friction was also small, since that portion of Western Australia is rather flat.

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

The eye of Cyclone Kelvin could also be seen in Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images, viewed using RealEarth (below). The actual times of the Terra and Suomi NPP satellite overpasses were 0154 UTC and 0452 UTC on 18 February, respectively.

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Large hail in Argentina

February 8th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images, with hourly surface reports (metric units) for Córdoba, Argentina [click to play animated GIF — MP4 also available]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the development of severe thunderstorms which produced very large hail in Córdoba, Argentina on 08 February 2018. Distinct above-anvil plumes were evident on the Visible imagery, with pulses of overshooting tops exhibiting Infrared brightness temperatures in the -70 to -80ºC range (black to white enhancement). The hail reportedly began around 1930 UTC or 4:30 PM local time.

The above-anvil plumes could also be seen in GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images (below).

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images, with hourly surface reports (metric units) for Córdoba, Argentina [click to play animated GIF — MP4 also available]

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the thunderstorm just west of Córdoba around 1850 UTC.

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

According to the Worldview site, the coldest Aqua MODIS cloud-top infrared brightness temperature at that time was -78ºC (below).

Aqua MODIS True-color and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A time series plot of surface observations at Córdoba (below) showed the warm temperatures and high dew points prior to the arrival of the thunderstorms; there were a number of hail reports between 19 UTC and 02 UTC (4 PM to 11 PM local time).

Time series of surface observations at Córdoba, Argentina [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations at Córdoba, Argentina [click to enlarge]

Eruption of Volcán de Fuego in Guatemala

February 1st, 2018 |

GOES-16 Near-Infrared

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm, top), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm, middle) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, bottom) images [click to animate]

After a series of occasional weak emissions during the previous month, a small eruption of Volcán de Fuego began during the pre-dawn hours on 01 February 2018. The thermal anomaly or “hot spot” could be seen on GOES-16 (GOES-East) Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above). In terms of the two Near-Infrared bands, even though the 1.61 µm band has better spatial resolution (1 km at satellite sub-point), the 2-km resolution 2.24 µm band is spectrally located closer to the peak emitted radiance of very hot features such as active volcanoes or large fires.

Multi-spectral retrievals of Ash Cloud Height from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (below) indicated that volcanic ash extended to altitudes in the 4-6 km range (yellow to green enhancement), with isolated 7 km pixels at 1315 UTC. The product also showed the effect of a burst of southwesterly winds just after 11 UTC, which began to transport some of the ash northeastward (as mentioned in the 1332 UTC advisory).

GOES-16 Ash Height product [click to animate]

GOES-16 Ash Height product [click to animate]

At 1624 UTC, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 False-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the primary ash plume drifting to the west, with some lower-altitude ash spreading out northward and southward. A thermal anomaly was also evident at the summit of the volcano.

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 False-color RGB image [click to enlarge]