Eruption of the Fuego volcano in Guatemala

June 3rd, 2018 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared (10.3 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports {click to play animation]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed that an explosive eruption of the Fuego volcano in Guatemala occurred just after 18 UTC on 03 June 2018. The height of the ash was estimated to be 50,000 feet.

The tan to light brown color of the ash cloud was evident on GOES-16 true-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images, as viewed using RealEarth (below).

GOES-16 true-color RGB images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 true-color RGB images [click to play animation]

On GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) imagery (below), note the appearance of a persistent thermal anomaly or “hot spot” at the summit of Fuego for about 5 hours prior to the explosive eruption. This thermal anomaly became apparent around 1300 UTC, after which time a low-level volcanic plume could be seen drifting northward.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface observations [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

16-panel composite of all ABI bands [click to play MP4 animation]

16-panel composite of all ABI bands [click to play MP4 animation]

 

Kilauea effects stretch to Guam

June 1st, 2018 |

Suomi-NPP Views of the eastern tip of the island of Hawai’i at 1155 UTC on 1 June 2018. VIIRS Day Night Band Visible (0.70) and Shortwave Infrared (3.75) and Longwave Infrared (11.45) (Click to enlarge)

Early on 1 June 2018, clear skies allowed an unobstructed view of the still-erupting Kilauea from Suomi-NPP. (Orbit paths from this link).   The image above steps through the Day Night Band 0.7 µm Visible Image, the 3.75 µm Shortwave Infrared, and the 11.45 µm Longwave Infrared. The warm signatures of the lava extend all the way into the ocean.


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Photo showing Volcanic Haze on the Island of Guam (photo courtesy Brandon Aydlett, NWS GUM)

On 30 May 2018, hazy skies were widespread over the Mariana Islands, haze that could be traced back to Hawaii. (The picture above looks northeast from Nimitz Hill on the island of Guam).

The visible imagery below shows a pall of haze entrenched within the tropical easterlies from south and west of Hawai’i all the way across the Pacific Basin to Guam — a distance of some 4000 miles! (Himawari imagery courtesy Brandon Aydlett, NWS GUM, where the National Weather Service day begins!)

Himawari-8 Band 3 (0.64 µm) Imagery on Wednesday 30 May 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Minor explosive eruption of Kilauea in Hawai’i

May 19th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product {click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Cloud Height product [click to play animation]

An explosive eruption from the Halema’uma’u crater at the Kilauea summit on the Big Island of Hawai’i occurred around 1550 UTC on 19 May 2018. Using Himawari-8 data, multispectral retrievals of parameters such as Ash Cloud Height (above) and Ash Loading (below) from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site helped to characterize the volcanic ash plume.

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Ash Loading product [click to play animation]

Later in the day, a Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the hazy signature of volcanic smog or “vog” which had spread out to the south, southwest and west of the Big Island. Light amounts of ash fall were reported downwind of Kilauea.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Eruptions of Kilauea in Hawai’i

May 5th, 2018 |

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Heightened seismic activity of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawai’i had been ongoing since April 2018, but increased further in early May leading to a series of minor eruptions (Hawaiian Volcano Observatory | USGS) — and GOES-15 (GOES-West) Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the nearly persistent thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (dark black to red enhancement) during the 03-05 May period. Among the numerous earthquakes, the strongest was an M6.9 which occurred at 2233 UTC on 04 May.

A nighttime image of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) data viewed using RealEarth (below) revealed the bright glow from Kilauea, and also from the Leilani Estates subdivision where several fissure vents had opened (forcing some evacuations).

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day.Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with the island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band images from 03 May and 04 May (below) showed the before/after difference in the bright signal emitted by the fissure vents near Leilani Estates.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

===== 06 May Update =====

Eruptions of fissure vents became more continuous in the Leilani Estates subdivision on 06 May. A comparison of GOES-15 Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) showed a long volcanic plume streaming southwestward, with robust thermal anomaly activity at the plume source.

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/G15_VIS_SWIR_HI_06MAY2018_960x640_B12_2018126_201500_0002PANELS_00002.GIF

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image (below) provided a more detailed view of the volcanic plume at 0007 UTC on 07 May. Note the cluster of red thermal anomalies in the vicinity of the Leilani Estates subdivision (the source of the plume).

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image, with VIIRS thermal anomalies plotted in red [click to enlarge]