Tropical Depression Flossie near Hawai’i

August 5th, 2019 |

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

An animation that cycles through GOES-17 (GOES-West) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images (above) showed Tropical Depression Flossie just northeast of Hawai’i on 05 August 2019. Note that (1) the exposed low-level circulation center (LLCC) was very apparent in the visible imagery, (2) deep convection offset to the east/northeast of the LLCC exhibited cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures as cold as -83ºC , and (3) a series of gravity waves were propagating westward away from the convection, moving toward Hawai’i.

GOES-15 Infrared imagery and deep-layer wind shear data from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed that the tropical cyclone was in an environment of strong shear, which was responsible for the displacement between the exposed LLCC and the convection. In addition to the wind shear, the weakening trend of the system was also due to its motion over cold Sea Surface Temperatures and low Ocean Heat Content.

GOES-15 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with contours and streamlines of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

GOES-15 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with contours and streamlines of deep-layer wind shear at 18 UTC [click to enlarge]

Tropical Storm Barry

July 11th, 2019 |

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with plots of buoy and ship reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with plots of buoy and ship reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Tropical Storm Barry formed in the far northern Gulf of Mexico on 11 July 2019 — 1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (above) displayed increasing convection associated with the tropical cyclone. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures were -86ºC.

As was seen in an animation of GOES-16 Infrared imagery from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below), Barry was in an environment of low deep-layer wind shear — a factor that was favorable for further intensification.

GOES-16 Infrared (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared (11.2 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

===== 12 July Update =====

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute GOES-16 Visible images (above) revealed a mesovortex that was rotating counter-clockwise around the low-level circulation center of Barry, which was approaching the coast of Louisiana on 12 July. Note that the METAR site located immediately east of the mesovortex around 17 UTC — KMDJ, Mississippi Canyon Oil Platform — had a wind gust of 73 knots or 84 mph around that time (and later had a wind gust to 90 mph at 2135 UTC or 4:35 PM CDT)

The corresponding GOES-16 Infrared images (below) showed that deep convection remained to the south of the center of Barry.

 GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

===== 17 July Update =====

Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product on 09 July [click to enlarge]

An Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature image 2 days prior to the formation of Tropical Storm Barry (above) showed SST values in the upper 80s to low 90s F (darker shades of orange to red) in the northern Gulf of Mexico just south of Louisiana.

8 days later, a Terra MODIS SST image (below) revealed values predominantly in the lower to middle 80s F (green to yellow enhancement) — the slow movement of Barry as it eventually reached hurricane intensity just prior to landfall induced an upwelling of cooler sub-surface water over that area.

Terra MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product on 17 July [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product on 17 July [click to enlarge]

Hurricane Barbara in the East Pacific

July 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the eye of Category 4 Hurricane Barbara on 02 July 2019. Mesovortices were briefly seen within the eye in the Visible imagery. Barbara was moving through an environment of low deep-layer wind shear and over warm water, factors favorable for rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON).

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) imagery from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed a closed eyewall at 1448 UTC.

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

A 1700 UTC  GOES-17 “Red” Visible image with an overlay of Metop-A ASCAT winds (below) revealed surface scatterometer wind speeds as high as 76 knots just north of the eye.

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Metop-A ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

===== 03 July Update =====

GOES-17 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm, top) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Barbara maintained Category 4 intensity on 03 July — and 1-minute GOES-17 Visible and Infrared GOES-17 images (above) provided a better view of mesovortices within the eye.

Mesoscale vortex along the Texas coast

June 5th, 2019 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface wind barbs plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) revealed a mesoscale vortex near the Texas coast (in the general vicinity of Houston) on 05 June 2019. This could have been a Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV), but there is evidence to suggest that it was a remnant circulation of what was Tropical Invest 91L a few days earlier.

Using a 3-hourly 850 hPa Relative Vorticity product from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below), the northward migration of vorticity associated with Invest 91L could be followed from the Bay of Campeche on 02 June to the Texas coast on 05 June.

850 hPa Relative Vorticity product, from 00 UTC on 02 June to 00 UTC on 06 June 2019 [click to play animation]

850 hPa Relative Vorticity product, from 00 UTC on 02 June to 00 UTC on 06 June 2019 [click to play animation]