Lake Michigan Mesovortex

December 31st, 2017 |

1-minute GOES-16

1-minute GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly surface reports plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed a well-defined mesoscale vortex (or “mesovortex”) moving southward across southern Lake Michigan on 31 December 2017. The default western GOES-16 Mesoscale Sector provided images at 1-minute intervals. This feature was responsible for brief periods of heavy snow at locations such as South Haven, Michigan KLWA (beginning at 1455 UTC), Benton Harbor, Michigan KBEH (beginning at 1625 UTC) and La Porte, Indiana KPPO (from 2055 to 2115 UTC).

Comparisons of POES AVHRR/Terra MODIS/Suomi NPP Infrared (10.8 µm/11.0 µm/11.45 µm) and Visible (0.86 µm/0.65 µm/0.64 µm) images along with an overlay of the corresponding Real-Time Mesoscale Analysis (RTMA) surface winds (below) provided views of the mesovortex at 1522 UTC, 1714 UTC and 1852 UTC, respectively.

POES AVHRR Infrared (10.8 µm) and Visible (0.86 µm) images at 1522 UTC, with 15 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

POES AVHRR Infrared (10.8 µm) and Visible (0.86 µm) images at 1522 UTC, with 15 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared (11.0 µm) and Visible (0.65 µm) images at 1714 UTC, with 17 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared (11.0 µm) and Visible (0.65 µm) images at 1714 UTC, with 17 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP Infrared (11.45 µm) and Visible (0.64 µm) images at 1852 UTC, with 19 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP Infrared (11.45 µm) and Visible (0.64 µm) images at 1852 UTC, with 19 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

During the preceding nighttime hours, a comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images at 0729 UTC along with an overlay of 07 UTC RTMA surface winds (below) showed in spite of patchy thin cirrus clouds over the region, ample illumination from the Moon (which was in the Waxing Gibbous phase, at 96% of Full) enabled a signature of the early stage of mesovortex formation to be seen on the Day/Night Band (DNB) image. Ice crystals within the thin cirrus clouds were responsible for the significant scattering city light signatures on the DNB image.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images at 0729 UTC, with 07 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images at 0729 UTC, with 07 UTC RTMA surface winds [click to enlarge]

As an aside, it is interesting to note that ice could be seen in the nearshore waters of Lake Michigan — both in the western part of the lake, off the coast of Wisconsin and Illinois, and in the eastern part of the lake off the coast of Lower Michigan. The lake ice appeared as darker shades of cyan in the 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS false-color (Band 7-2-1 combination) Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image from the MODIS Today site (below).

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color images over southern Lake Michigan [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS true-color and false-color images over southern Lake Michigan [click to enlarge]

Alaska’s first -40º temperature of the 2017-2018 winter season

November 19th, 2017 |

NOAA-18 Infrared Window (10.8 mm) image, with surface identifiers and air temperatures plotted in red [click to enlarge]

NOAA-18 Infrared Window (10.8 mm) image, with surface identifiers and air temperatures plotted in red [click to enlarge]

Alaska’s first (official) surface air temperature of -40º or colder for the 2017-2018 winter season was reported by the Cooperative Observer at Chicken (-43ºF) on 19 November 2017. A NOAA-18 Infrared Window (10.8 µm) image at 0320 UTC (above) showed cold air drainage into river valleys, with the coldest infrared brightness temperatures around -40ºC/-40ºF (darker blue color enhancement). Chicken is located about midway between Eagle (PAEG) and Northway (PAOR), where 03 UTC surface air temperatures were -17ºF and -24ºF, respectively. However, PAEG reached their minimum temperature around 11 UTC after additional hours of cloud-free radiational cooling.

An automated RAWS site at Chicken reached a minimum temperature of -34ºF at 1120 UTC — the dew point at that time was -42ºF. However, a MesoWest map (below) shows that the RAWS tower is located on a small hill (at an elevation of 2060 feet) — and the Cooperative Observer instrument shelter was likely located in the lower elevations of the settlement.

MesoWest map showing the location of the Chicken RAWS site [click to enlarge]

MesoWest map showing the location of the Chicken RAWS site [click to enlarge]

For comparison, note the 2011-2012 and 2010-2011 winter seasons.

Detection of low clouds on “Cirrus band” imagery

October 29th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top), Cirrus (1.37 µm, middle) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, top), Cirrus (1.37 µm, middle) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

The ABI “Cirrus” (1.37 µm) band is centered in a strong water vapor absorption spectral region — therefore it does not routinely sense the lower troposphere, where there is usually substantial amounts of water vapor. Hence, its main application is the detection of higher-altitude cirrus cloud features.

However, in areas of the atmosphere characterized by low amounts of total precipitable water, the Cirrus band can sense clouds (and other features, such as blowing dust) in the lower troposphere. Such was the case on 29 October 2017, when a ribbon of dry air resided over the northern Gulf of Mexico in the wake of a strong cold frontal passage; low-level stratocumulus clouds were very apparent on GOES-16 Cirrus band images (above). Also of note: cloud features associated with Tropical Storm Philippe could be seen east of Florida.

The three GOES-16 Water Vapor bands (Upper-level 6.2 µm, Mid-level 6.9 µm and Lower-level 7.3 µm) highlighted the pocket of dry air that was moving across the northern Gulf of Mexico on that day (below).

GOES-16 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, top), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, middle) and Lower-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, top), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, middle) and Lower-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation]

The MODIS instrument on Terra and Aqua has a 1.37 µm Cirrus band as well; 1619 UTC Terra images (below) also revealed the stratocumulus clouds (especially those over the northeastern Gulf, where the driest air resided). Conversely, note how the low cloud features of Philippe were not seen on the Cirrus image, since abundant moisture within the tropical air mass east of Florida attenuated 1.37 µm wavelength radiation originating from the lower atmosphere.

In addition, the VIIRS instrument — on Suomi NPP, and the upcoming JPSS series — has a 1.37 µm Cirrus band.

Terra MODIS visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.375 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS visible (0.65 µm), Cirrus (1.375 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Hourly images of the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (below) showed the ribbon of very dry air (TPW values less than 10 mm or 0.4 inch) sinking southward over the northern Gulf of Mexico. This TPW product uses microwave data from POES, Metop and Suomi NPP satellites (description).

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/tpw_17z.png

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water images [click to play animation]

Hurricane Irma moves through the Florida Keys

September 10th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI Infrared Imagery from the Clean Window (10.3 µm), 0122-1342 UTC (Click to animate)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

GOES-16 Infrared Imagery, above, shows Hurricane Irma moving north on a wobbly path (displaying trochoidal motion) through the Florida Keys. The eye of the storm moved between Key West (surface data plot) and Marathon (surface data plot) around sunrise on 10 September. Also note the development of well-defined transverse banding well to the northwest and north of the storm center — a cloud signature often associated with high-altitude turbulence. (In addition, GOES-16 Infrared images during 09-10 September with plots of surface wind gusts in knots is available here). Irma is a storm increasingly affected by wind shear, as evidenced by the asymmetries in the upper level clouds. and as noted in the 1200 UTC 10 September 2017 Wind Shear analysis below (Source).

Wind shear (850-250 hPa) analysis, 1200 UTC 10 September, over GOES-13 Visible Imagery (0.64) (Click to enlarge)

 

Irma is being influenced by a mid-latitude system and is gradually starting the extended process of extratropical transition. The drying associated with the mid-latitude system is very apparent over the Gulf of Mexico in the animation of 6.95 µm (Mid-level Water Vapor) Infrared Imagery from GOES-16, below.

 

GOES-16 Mid-Level Water Vapor (6.95 µm) Infrared Imagery, 0230 -1445 UTC on 10 September 2017 (Click to animate)

MIMIC TPW, below (source), shows the convergence of residual Atlantic frontal moisture from the east (into northern Florida) and Hurricane Irma’s moisture fro the the Caribbean (into southern Florida) (Click to animate).

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (Click to animate)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (Click to animate)

Suomi NPP overflew Irma at 0740 UTC on 10 September, and Day/Night Band Visible Imagery (0.70 µm) is toggled with Infrared Imagery (11.45 µm) over the eye, below.

Suomi NPP Imagery over the eye of Irma: Day/Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) and Infrared (11.45 µm), 0740 UTC on 10 September (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP Imagery: Day/Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) and Infrared (11.45 µm), 0740 UTC on 10 September (Click to enlarge)

During the subsequent daytime hours, VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1855 UTC, below, showed the eye of Category 3 Hurricane Irma about 40 minutes prior to landfall at Marco Island, Florida.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (Click to enlarge)

 

A toggle through 6 different Suomi NPP Channels near the time of landfall (0.41 µm, 0.64 µm, 0.86 µm, 1.38 µm, 1.61 µm and 10.8 µm) is shown below.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Imagery at 1852 UTC on 10 September 2017: 0.41 µm, 0.64 µm, 0.86 µm, 1.38 µm, 1.61 µm and 10.8 µm) (Click to enlarge)