Camp Fire in northern California

November 8th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top left), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, top right), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom left) and Fire Temperature (bottom right) [click to play animation | MP4]

The Camp Fire started at 1433 UTC or 6:33 AM local time on 08 November 2018 in Northern California; the rapid spread of the fire prompted evacuations and forced road closures. GOES-16 (GOES-East) GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm), “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) and Fire Temperature (above) showed the evolution of the fire at 5-minute intervals — especially noteworthy were the rapid vertical jump of the smoke column seen at 1547 UTC (which cast a long shadow), and Fire Temperature values that exceeded 2000 K (bright red pixels) at numerous times with a maximum value just over 2300 K.

A GOES-16 Mesoscale Domain Sector was positioned over California beginning at 2115 UTC, providing imagery at 1-minute intervals — a comparison of Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) showed how quickly the hot thermal signature of the fire (yellow to red enhancement) advanced southwestward during the remaining 3 hours of daylight. Just northwest of the fire, Chico (station identifier KCIC) reported very low relative humidity values (6% at 21 UTC), as seen by the large spread between temperature and dewpoint late in the day.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

1-km resolution NOAA-18 AVHRR Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images (below) showed the bifurcation of the smoke plume as well as the large, very hot thermal signature of the fire at 1712 UTC or 9:12 AM local time.

NOAA-18 AVHRR Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared "Vegetation" (0.86 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µµ) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-18 AVHRR Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared

NOAA-20 VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Higher spatial resolution views were provided by NOAA-20 VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (above) and by Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images (below). [Note: the NOAA-20 VIIRS images are incorrectly labeled as Suomi NPP]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Near-Infrared

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Alternative views of the NOAA-20 VIIRS and Aqua MODIS images are shown below (using legacy AWIPS-1).They include Shortwave Infrared images from the 2 satellites, which reveal the very large (approximately 10 miles in length) thermal anomaly or fire “hot spot”. Due to the very dry atmosphere over the region (MODIS 6.7 µm Water Vapor image), the smoke could be clearly seen on the MODIS 1.37 µm Cirrus image (since there was very little attenuation of upwelling 1.37 µm radiation by middle/upper-tropospheric water vapor).

NOAA-20 Visible (0.64 µm), Day/Night Band (0.7 µm), Near-Infrared "Snow/Ice" (1.61 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 Visible (0.64 µm), Day/Night Band (0.7 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Near-Infrared "Cirrus" (1.37 µm), Near-Infrared "Snow/Ice" (1.61 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Visible (0.65 µm), Near-Infrared “Cirrus” (1.37 µm), Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images [click to enlarge]

As a result of the unusual dryness air mass across the region, the 00 UTC Oakland sounding set a record low Total Precipitable Water value for the date (3 mm or 0.12 inch):

 

The Aqua MODIS Total Precipitable Water product at 2123 UTC (below) showed widespread values in the 3-5 mm range (darker shades of brown) over much or northern California. 12 hours later, the TPW value from the 12 UTC Oakland sounding was slightly lower (2.9 mm or 0.11 inch) — and the MODIS TPW product at 0921 UTC continued to show widespread dry air over California.

Aqua MODIS Total Precipitable Water product and Visible (0.65 µm) image at 2123 UTC [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS Total Precipitable Water product and Visible (0.65 µm) image at 2123 UTC [click to enlarge]

True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) imagery from NOAA-20 VIIRS (below) provided a good view of the smoke.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

A NOAA-15 AVHRR Shortwave Infrared image at 0225 UTC or 6:25 PM local time (below) depicted the very large thermal anomaly of the fire.

NOAA-15 AVHRR Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) image; major highways are plotted in cyan, with Interstate highways plotted in red [click to enlarge]

NOAA-15 AVHRR Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) image; major highways are plotted in cyan, with Interstate highways plotted in red [click to enlarge]

The smoke had an adverse  impact on air quality over 100 miles from the fire source: the surface visibility dropped to 1 mile at Santa Rosa KSTS and 2 miles at San Francisco International Airport KSFO (below).

Time series of surface observations for Santa Rosa [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations from Santa Rosa [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations from San Francisco International Airport [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations from San Francisco International Airport [click to enlarge]

===== 09 November Update =====

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Nighttime VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images from NOAA-20 at 0849 UTC (above) and Suomi NPP at 0942 UTC (below) revealed the bright glow and the large, hot thermal anomaly of the Camp Fire.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB images from Suomi NPP at 2104 UTC and NOAA-20 at 2154 UTC (below) showed the broad extent of the smoke from the Camp Fire in northern California as well as the Woolsey Fire in southern California. These images were captured and processed by the CIMSS/SSEC Direct Broadcast ground station.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2104 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2104 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2154 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2154 UTC [click to enlarge]

An animation of 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) revealed several plume jumps over the fire source from 15-19 UTC — and toward the end of the day, a decrease in the areal coverage and intensity of hot pixels indicated that extreme fire conditions were easing and containment efforts were slowing the spread of the fire.

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Abnormally dry to extreme drought conditions across California were a contributing factor to this and other wildfires across the state.

US Drought Monitor conditions as of 06 November [click to enlarge]

US Drought Monitor conditions as of 06 November [click to enlarge]

====== 11 November Update =====

Suomi NPP VIIRS Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to play animation]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images [click to play animation]

A sequence of Suomi NPP VIIRS Shortwave Infrared (3.74 µm) images centered at Paradise, California viewed using RealEarth (above) showed the spread of the Camp Fire thermal anomaly (dark black pixels) during the period 1943 UTC on 08 November to 1046 UTC on 11 November.

1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) showed the development of new smoke plume and hot thermal signatures around the periphery of the ongoing Camp Fire during the day on 11 November. As of 1849 UTC (10:49 AM local time), the fire had burned 109,000 acres and was listed as 25% contained.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

The new smoke plume — as well as residual smoke from previous days of burning — could be seen on VIIRS True Color RGB imagery from Suomi NPP at 2029 UTC and NOAA-20 at 2114 UTC (below). The entire image swaths as captured and processed by the Direct Broadcast ground station at CIMSS/SSEC can be seen here and here.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2029 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2029 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2114 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image at 2114 UTC [click to enlarge]

The Camp Fire has claimed 42 lives and destroyed 6,522 homes and 260 businesses, making it both the deadliest and the most destructive wildfire on record for the state of California.

Pyrocumulonimbus cloud in South Africa

October 29th, 2018 |

Meteosat-11 Visible (0.8 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.92 µm) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Visible (0.8 µm, top), Shortwave Infrared (3.92 µm, center) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.8 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

The Garden Route Fires had been burning since about 24 October 2018 near George along the southern coast of South Africa (media story). On 29 October, EUMETSAT Meteosat-11 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.92 µm) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images (above) showed an elongated west-to-east oriented thermal anomaly or fire “hot spot” (red pixels) just northeast of George (station identifier FAGG) on Shortwave Infrared imagery during the hours leading up to the formation of a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud around 1300 UTC. The pyroCb exhibited the characteristic warm (+10 to +15ºC, darker gray enhancement) shortwave infrared cloud-top signature just off the coast at 1315 UTC, — this is due to enhanced solar reflection off ice crystals that are smaller compared to those of conventional thunderstorm tops.

Zooming out a bit to follow the southeastward drift of the pyroCb cloud (below), the coldest cloud-top 10.8 µm infrared brightness temperature (BT) was -61ºC (darker red enhancement) at 1315 UTC — then the cloud tops remained in the -55 to -59ºC range (orange enhancement) for the next 6 hours or so. Leveraging the large difference between cold 10.8 µm and warm 3.92 µm BTs, NRL calculates a pyroCb index, which classified this feature as an “intense pyroCb” (1315 UTC | animation). The coldest 10.8 µm cloud-top BT of -61ºC roughly corresponds to an altitude of 13.5 km based on 12 UTC rawinsonde data from Port Elizabeth (plot | list).

Meteosat-11 Shortwave Infrared (3.92 µm, left) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.8 µm, right) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Meteosat-11 Shortwave Infrared (3.92 µm, left) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.8 µm, right) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Imagery from NOAA-19 at 1420 UTC (courtesy of René Servranckx) also revealed the warm (dark gray) Shortwave Infrared pyroCb signature, along with a minimum cloud-top infrared BT of -58.1ºC (below).

NOAA-19 AVHRR imagery at 1420 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 AVHRR imagery at 1420 UTC [click to enlarge]

A Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image at 1230 UTC (below) was about a half hour before the formation of the pyroCb, but it did show a signature of smoke drifting southeastward off the coast.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

On the following day (30 October), a NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color image (below) showed the classic comma cloud signature of a mid-latitude cyclone south of the coast, with the band of cold-frontal clouds extending northward across Lesotho. Note the thick plume of smoke spreading eastward within the strong post-frontal westerly winds.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

A time series of of surface observations from George (below) supported the idea of a cold frontal passage: ahead of the front, temperatures rapidly rose to 104ºF/40ºC (with a dew point of 39ºF/4ºC) on 28 October about 1.5 hours prior to the formation of the pyroCb — then strong westerly winds (gusting to 40 knots/21 mps) with rising pressures and falling temperatures followed on 30 October.

Time series plot of of surface observations from George [click to enlarge]

Time series plot of of surface observations from George [click to enlarge]

The pyroCb research community believes that this is the first documented case of a pyroCb on the African continent.

 

Super Typhoon Yutu makes landfall on Tinian and Saipan

October 24th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 “Clean Window” Infrared (10.41 µm) Imagery, 0900-1540 UTC on 24 October 2018 (Click to animate)

Himawari-8 Clean Window Infrared (10.41 µm) imagery shows Super Typhoon Yutu poised to hit Tinian and Saipan in the Marianas Islands, to the northeast of Guam. The 0900 UTC Advisory from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center shows a storm with sustained winds of 145 knots, with strengthening forecast. JMA estimates a surface pressure of 905 hPa! (Link)

(Himawari data courtesy JMA and the NWS Pacific Region)

Update: Landfall on Tinian and Saipan occurred just before 1500 UTC; a closer view using 2.5 minute rapid scan Himawari-8 imagery can be seen here (station plot PGSN is Saipan, where reliable observations ceased after 1452 UTC).

Added: From William Straka, CIMSS. NOAA-20 had a fortuitous overpass, almost directly over Tinian at landfall. The Day Night Band Visible (0.7 µm) Imagery (with a full moon) and 11.45 µm infrared imagery is shown below).

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day Night Band visible (0.7 µm) imagery and I05 infrared (11.45 µm) imagery, 1551 UTC on 24 October 2018 (Click to enlarge)

CIMSS helps manage a Direct Broadcast (DB) antenna at the National Weather Service on Guam, and that antenna received both NOAA-20 and GCOM data as the eye was over, or close to, Tinian.  Microwave imagery from The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR-2) on JAXA’s GCOM satellite, below, (courtesy Kathy Strabala, CIMSS) at 36.5 GHz and 89.0 GHz, reveals cloud and rainband structures that infrared imagery cannot.  In particular, the 89.0 GHz imagery suggests the formation of an outer eyewall ouside the very compact inner eye.  This typically is the start of an eyewall replacement cycle.

GCOM AMSR-2 imagery at 36.5 and 89.0 GHz, 1601 UTC on 24 October 2018 (Click to enlarge)

The DB antenna also processed data from NOAA-20, the same overpass as shown above, zoomed in over Tinian. The antenna is able to capture data over much of the western Pacific Basin, as the Day Night Band visible image shows below. A true color image from the previous overpass on Guam, 12 hours earlier, during daytime (0311 UTC on 24 October), is here.

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day Night Band visible (0.7 µm) imagery, 1544 UTC on 24 October 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Ferguson Fire in California forms a pyrocumulonimbus cloud

July 15th, 2018 |
GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

* GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational *

The Ferguson Fire in central California produced a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud during the afternoon hours on 15 July 2018. GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed that the high-altitude portion of the pyroCb cloud then drifted northeastward toward the California/Nevada border, where cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures cooled to near -55ºC (orange enhancement) as it crossed the border around 0005 UTC on 16 July.

A comparison of Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm), GOES-17 (0.64 µm) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm) is shown below — with the imagery displayed in the native projection of each satellite. Images from GOES-16/17 are at 5-minute intervals, while images from GOES-15 are every 5-15 minutes depending on the operational scan schedule of that GOES-West satellite. GOES-17 was at its post-launch checkout position of 89.5ºW longitude, so it offered a more direct view of the pyroCb cloud.

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation]

A toggle between NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images (below) showed the pyroCb cloud southwest of the California/Nevada border (between Bridgeport KBAN and Mammoth KMMH) at 2327 UTC. In spite of a minimum cloud-top 10.8 µm infrared brightness temperature of -59ºC (red enhancement), note the darker (warmer) appearance of the cloud on the 3.7 µm image — this is due to reflection of solar radiation off the smaller ice particles of the pyroCb anvil. The -59ºC temperature roughly corresponded to an altitude of 13 km or 42.6 kft on the 00 UTC Reno, Nevada rawinsonde report (plot | data)

NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A time lapse of the pyroCb was created by Sierra Fire Watch (below).

Time lapse [click to play YouTube video]

Time lapse [click to play YouTube video]