Super Typhoon Jelawat

March 30th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery, hourly from 2200 UTC 29 March through 0800 UTC 30 March (Click to animate)

Super Typhoon Jelawat has developed in the central Pacific Ocean, to the west of Guam and the Marianas Islands. The hourly imagery, above, from Himawari-8, from 2200 UTC on 29 March through 0800 UTC on 30 March show a rapid eye development. Satellite presentation seems best at around 0500 UTC, with a well-defined eye. Subsequently, high clouds covered the eye as it became less symmetric.

Himarwari-8 AHI Band 13 (“Clean Window”, 10.41 µm) Infrared Imagery, 2300 UTC on 29 March 2018 through 0140 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Infrared Imagery (10.41 µm) imagery, above, shows a well-defined eye shortly after 0000 UTC. Following a data outage, imagery from 1400 UTC to 1600 UTC, below, shows a central region of cold convective clouds, but no obvious eye.

Himarwari-8 AHI Band 13 (“Clean Window”, 10.41 µm) Infrared Imagery, 1420 UTC on 30 March 2018 through 1600 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Water Vapor Infrared Imagery from Himawari, below, shows that outflow from Jelawat is well-established to the north; outflow appears to be entrained into the mid-latitude westerlies. MIMIC Total Precipitable Water for the 24 hours ending 1600 UTC on 30 March (shown underneath the water vapor infrared imagery below) also shows the entrainment of tropical moisture around Jelawat into mid-latitudes.  The Total Precipitable Water shows a band of rich moisture extending to the east-southeast of Jelawat, portending a wet period for the Marianas Islands.

Himawari-8 AHI Water Vapor Imagery, Bands 8 (6.24 µm) and 10 (7.35 µm) at 1600 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Morphed Microwave Observations of Total Precipitable Water, 1700 UTC on 29 March 2018 to 1600 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Morphed Storm-centered Microwave Imagery for the 24 hours ending at 0900 UTC on 30 March, 2018 (from this site), show the rapid intensification after 0000 UTC on 30 March.  (Update:  a similar animation that ends at 1900 UTC on 30 March 2018 demonstrates a rapid collapse of the eyewall convection!)

Morphed Microwave Imagery for the 24 hours ending at ~0900 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Full-resolution Visible Imagery from AHI (Band 3, 0.64) is shown below. (Faster and slower animations are available). A rapid organization and clearing of the eye is apparent around 0400 UTC with an equally-rapid apparent subsequent obscuration.

Full-Resolution Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery, hourly from 0000 UTC 30 March through 0850 UTC 30 March (Click to animate)

GCOM overflew the storm at around 1610 UTC on 30 March, and the toggle below shows the 36.5 and 89.0 Ghz imagery over the storm (the same enhancement is used in each image).  The 36.5 Ghz imagery suggests a very asymmetric storm.  Eyewall convection in the 89 Ghz imagery is not robust. (These data were downloaded at the Direct Broadcast antenna on Guam and are courtesy Kathy Strabala, SSEC/CIMSS)

GCOM AMSR-2 36.5 and 89.0 GHz imagery over Jelawat, 1604 UTC on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP also both overflew Jelawat around 1600 UTC on 30 March. The toggles below show NOAA-20 and then Suomi NPP Day Night Band visible imagery. and Infrared 11.45 Imagery, at 1549 and 1639 UTC. (Imagery courtesy William Straka, SSEC/CIMSS)  In contrast to the Visible and Infrared imagery from Himawari earlier in the day (at top), an eye is not present.  (Note that NOAA-20 data are provisional, non-operational, and undergoing testing still.)

VIIRS Infrared Imagery (11.45 µm) from NOAA-20 (1549 UTC) and Suomi NPP (1639 UTC) on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

VIIRS Day Night Band Visible Imagery (0.70 µm) from NOAA-20 (1549 UTC) and Suomi NPP (1639 UTC) on 30 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP also overflew the storm on 29 March 2018, at 0421 UTC. This was before Jelawat’s rapid intensification. The toggle below again uses data from the Direct Broadcast antenna on Guam and shows VIIRS visible (0.64 µm) and infrared (11.45 µm) imagery, MIRS products (Total Precipitable Water and Rain Rate) derived from data from the ATMS microwave sounder on Suomi NPP, and individual microwave channels from ATMS: 31, 88, 165 and 183 Ghz.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared (11.45 µm) Imagery, MIRS Total Precipitable Water and Rain Rate, and individual Suomi NPP ATMS Channels: 31, 88, 165 and 183 GHz, all at 0421 UTC on 29 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Interests in the Marianas Islands should closely monitor the progress and evolution of this storm. This site and this site both have information on the system.

Cyclone Marcus west of Australia and south of Java

March 22nd, 2018 |

Himawari-8 AHI Band 13 (10.4 µm) infrared imagery, 0900-1540 UTC on 22 March 2018 (Click to animate)

NOAA-20 Imagery shown in this post is Non-Operational and preliminary and undergoing testing.

Himawari-8 captured the slow southward progress of Cyclone Marcus along 105 E Longitude between 0900 and 1540 UTC, as shown above.  During those six hours, the storm presentation suggested weakening, with a reduction in the central dense overcast and a warming of the eye.

Earlier, on 21 March at around 1800 UTC, the storm was at Category 5 Intensity on the Saffir-Simpson scale, and showed excellent presentation in the Day Night Band imagery, despite the lack of lunar illumination, and in the infrared (Click here for a toggle between the 0.70 µm Day Night Band Visible imagery and the 11.45 µm infrared imagery from Suomi NPP).  Significant Mesospheric Gravity Waves are apparent in all three images, the first (1710 UTC 21 March) and last (1850 UTC 21 March) from NOAA-20, and the middle (1800 UTC 21 March) from Suomi NPP.  (The waves are most prominent in the 1710 UTC Image from NOAA-20) The figure shows how Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 data can be used to create animations. A similar animation with Infrared Imagery (1710, 1800, and 1850 UTC) is below. (Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 Imagery courtesy Will Straka, CIMSS).

VIIRS Day Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) Imagery at 1710 UTC (from NOAA-20), 1800 UTC (from Suomi NPP), and from 1850 UTC (from NOAA-20) (Click to enlarge)

VIIRS Day Infrared (11.45 µm) Imagery at 1710 UTC (from NOAA-20), 1800 UTC (from Suomi NPP), and from 1850 UTC (from NOAA-20) (Click to enlarge)

Morphed microwave imagery for the 48 hours ending at about 1300 UTC on 22 March (from this site) show the evolution of the strong convection surrounding Marcus.  Eyewall convection has diminished on 22 March.

Morphed Microwave imagery centered on Cyclone Marcus for the 48 hours ending 1300 UTC on 22 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Added: Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 also observe the atmosphere at Microwave wavelengths using ATMS (The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder). This toggle (created using McIDAS-V and data from the NOAA CLASS system) shows the 31 and 88 Ghz observations with the 11.45 VIIRS observations of the eye of Marcus at 1757 UTC on 21 March. The same brightness temperature enhancement is used for each image. Note that each observation shows a slightly different center location for the storm.

Early Spring Nor’easter over the eastern United States

March 21st, 2018 |

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) and I05 Infrared (11.45 µm) Imagery, 0645 UTC 21 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

NOAA-20 Imagery shown in this post is Non-Operational and preliminary and undergoing testing.

The imagery above shows a toggle between the Day Night Band Visible (0.70 µm) Imagery and the I05 Infrared (11.45 µm) Imagery on NOAA-20. The strong nor’easter affecting the East Coast of the United States is apparent in the imagery. Strong convection over the warm water south of the Gulf Stream to the east of the Carolinas is apparent in cold cloud tops in the infrared, and in lightning streaks in the Day Night Band imagery. The waxing crescent moon at the time was below the horizon; Earthglow is thus the primary illumination source for the clouds over the ocean. Over land, city lights are apparent, even through the thick precipitating clouds associated with the storm.

Additionally, the fine spatial resolution in the Infrared imagery allows for the identification of cloud-top gravity wave features in the warm conveyor belt over eastern Pennsylvania and New York, and also elsewhere.

Microwave imagery from Suomi NPP can be used to estimate rain rate (Here’s the OSPO site that shows this product from NOAA-18 and -19, and also Metop A and B; the Operational Blended Rain Rate product is here). The Real Earth image below shows Rain Rate from Suomi NPP ATMS data as calculated from the Direct Broadcast signal in Madison, WI; the entire system is not quite captured from the antenna in Madison, WI. Data that are used to compute the Rain Rate include 90 Ghz, shown here (also from Real Earth).  The heavy precipitation with the convection over the Atlantic is readily apparent.  Precipitation with this system extends back into Indiana!

Rain Rate computed from ATMS on Suomi NPP early morning passes, 21 March 2018 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 captured the temporal evolution of this storm. The animation of low-level water vapor (7.34) infrared imagery, below, shows a well-developed warm conveyor belt well to the east of an upper level feature that is wobbling westward over northern Kentucky. A second upper-level circulation develops northern Virginia and is obvious over West Virginia at the end of the animation. Strong subsidence can be inferred behind the storm as well, where the yellows/oranges appear in this water vapor enhancement, suggesting brightness temperatures around -10ºC. Very dry air is apparent north of the storm: The St Lawrence River is visible in the water vapor animation!

GOES-16 Low-Level Water Vapor Infrared (7.34 µm) animation, 0107 – 1622 UTC (Click to play 110 Mb animation)