Hurricane Dorian

August 28th, 2019 |

NOAA-20 Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, courtesy of William Straka (CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, courtesy of William Straka (CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (above) showed cold overshooting tops (darker black infrared enhancement) over the Leeward Islands as well as subtle mesospheric airglow waves propagating southward away from the center of Tropical Storm Dorian at 0606 UTC on 28 August 2019.

In a toggle between GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below), the Microwave image revealed a convective band that was wrapping around the northern portion of the center of Dorian at 0930 UTC.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window <em>(10.35 µm)</em> and DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave <em>(85 GHz)</em> images [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) and DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images [click to enlarge]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images (below) also showed a convective burst wrapping around the eastern and northern edges of the center of Dorian after 15 UTC. The coldest cloud-top infrared brightness temperature associated with that early convective burst was -83ºC.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Dorian was upgraded to a Category 1 Hurricane at 18 UTC. Prior to that time, the tropical cyclone had been moving through an environment of low deep-layer wind shear (below), one factor that is favorable for intensification. Dorian was also passing over water possessing warm sea surface temperatures and modest ocean heat content.

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/.gifGOES-16 Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 19 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with contours of deep-layer wind shear at 19 UTC [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP as viewed using RealEarth are shown below, from around the time when Dorian was upgraded from a Tropical Storm to a Hurricane.

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

A comparison of GOES-16 Infrared (at 2330 UTC) and GMI Microwave (at 2341 UTC) images (below) revealed Dorian’s small eye.

GOES-16 Infrared (10.35 µm) and GMI Microwave (85 GHz) images [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared (10.35 µm) and GMI Microwave (85 GHz) images [click to enlarge]

===== 29 August Update =====

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

On 29 August, 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (above) showed that periodic convective bursts persisted around the center of Category 1 Hurricane Dorian.

During one of those convective bursts from 1800-1900 UTC, an increase in GOES-16 GLM Flash Extent Density was evident (below).

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images at 1852 UTC with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density are shown below. At that particular time, the overshooting top infrared brightness temperature reached a minimum value of -82.5C.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) image at 1853 UTC, with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) image at 1852 UTC, with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) image at 1853 UTC, with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) image at 1852 UTC, with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to enlarge]

===== 30 August Update =====

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

The eye of Dorian became more well-defined in 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (above) during the morning hours on 30 August.

A DMSP-17 Microwave (85 GHz) Microwave image at 1141 UTC (below) did not yet show a completely closed eyewall structure at that earlier time.

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) Microwave image [click to enlarge]

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) Microwave image [click to enlarge]

Dorian was upgraded to a Category 3 hurricane at 18 UTC — the storm was moving into a narrow corridor of weaker deep-layer wind shear around that time. During the 3 hours leading up to 18 UTC, animations of 1-minute GOES-16 Visible and Infrared imagery — with and without an overlay of GLM Flash Extent Density — are shown below.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images, with and without overlays of GLM Flash Extent Density [click to play animation | MP4]

===== 31 August Update =====

30-second GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

30-second GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Overlapping 1-minute GOES-16 Mesoscale Domain Sectors provided imagery at 30-second intervals — Visible and Infrared animations of the Category 4 hurricane from 1430-1900 UTC are shown above and below, respectively. A longer Visible animation from 1100-2259 UTC is available here (courtesy of Pete Pokrandt, AOS).

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

30-second GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.35 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Record Total Precipitable Water in Alaska

August 14th, 2019 |

Plot of rawinsonde data from Anchorage, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Anchorage, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Fairbanks, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Fairbanks, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Total Precipitable Water (TPW) calculated from rawinsonde data at both Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska were all-time record maximum values at 00 UTC on 14 August 2019.

The microwave-based MIMIC TPW product (below) showed an atmospheric river of moisture moving northeastward toward Alaska during the 2 days leading up to the record-setting TPW values on the Anchorage and Fairbanks soundings. The global view suggested that some of this moisture may have originated from the northern periphery of the TPW reservoir associated with slow-moving Typhoon Krosa in the West Pacific Ocean, being transported eastward then northeastward by a series of frontal waves (surface analyses).

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water [click to play animation | MP4]

 

Record 24-hour rainfall in Nome, Alaska

August 3rd, 2019 |

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation | MP4]

The MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (TPW) product (above) showed a northward-moving atmospheric river that was responsible for producing a record 24-hour rainfall amount of 2.47 inches (62.7 mm) ending at 10 pm AKDT on 02 August (06 UTC on 03 August 2019). Some of the poleward transport of moisture was aided by the approach of a Gale Force low (surface analyses).

Blended TPW values reached 2.7 inches near Nome at 1537 UTC on 02 August — and broad areas of TPW greater than 200% of normal (yellow) were seen across the Bering Sea as the atmospheric river approached the Seward Peninsula (below).

Blended Total Precipitable Water and Percent of Normal [click to play animation | MP4]

Blended Total Precipitable Water and Percent of Normal TPW [click to play animation | MP4]

In a plot of surface data from Nome, Alaska over the 02-03 August period (below), heavy rain was reported at 1222 UTC on 02 August.

Time series of surface data from Nome, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface data from Nome, Alaska [click to enlarge]

A plot of rawinsonde data from Nome at 12 UTC on 02 August (below) revealed a TPW value of 37.7 mm (1.48 inches), which is among the top 10 TPW amounts on record for that site.

Plot of rawinsonde data from Nome at 12 UTC on 02 August [click to enlarge]

Plot of rawinsonde data from Nome at 12 UTC on 02 August [click to enlarge]

Hurricane Barbara in the East Pacific

July 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 (GOES-West) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed the eye of Category 4 Hurricane Barbara on 02 July 2019. Mesovortices were briefly seen within the eye in the Visible imagery. Barbara was moving through an environment of low deep-layer wind shear and over warm water, factors favorable for rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON).

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) imagery from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed a closed eyewall at 1448 UTC.

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

DMSP-17 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

A 1700 UTC  GOES-17 “Red” Visible image with an overlay of Metop-A ASCAT winds (below) revealed surface scatterometer wind speeds as high as 76 knots just north of the eye.

GOES-17

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Metop-A ASCAT winds [click to enlarge]

===== 03 July Update =====

GOES-17 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm, top) and "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, bottom) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Barbara maintained Category 4 intensity on 03 July — and 1-minute GOES-17 Visible and Infrared GOES-17 images (above) provided a better view of mesovortices within the eye.