Using GEOKOMPSAT-2 and Himawari-8 Imagery to create Stereoscopic Imagery

November 14th, 2019 |

Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery from Himawari-8 (left) and GEOKOMPSAT-2A (right) at 0400 and 0500 UTC on 14 Nov 2019 (Click to enlarge)

Geostationary data from KMA‘s GEOKOMPSAT-2 satellite (over the Equator at 128º E Longitude, shown above at right) and from JMA‘s Himawari-8 Satellite (over the Equator at 140º E Longitude, shown above at left) can be used to create stereoscopic imagery. The imagery above, from 0400 and 0500 UTC on 14 November 2019, centered at 15º N, 150º E, shows Typhoon Fengshen. Visible imagery from both satellites show a well-developed central cluster of thunderstorms with little apparent indication of wind shear. Stereoscopic views of the storm allow the vertical structure of the system to be perceived.

Data processing for these images was accomplished using Geo2Grid, a software package that incorporates Satpy. (Previous Blog posts discussing Geo2Grid are here and here).

Very grateful acknowledgement of these data from KMA and from JMA is extended. Thank you!

Added:  Click here for an animation from 0300 to 0550 UTC on 14 November.  (Warning:  Large animated gif at 159 M).

Bush fires in eastern Australia

November 8th, 2019 |

JMA Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and Longwave Infrared Window (10.4 µm) imagery (below) showed the evolution of smoke plumes, hot 3.9 µm fire thermal anomalies (red pixels) and cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of isolated pyrocumulus associated with bush fires that were burning in far eastern parts of New South Wales and Queensland, Australia from 1900 UTC on 07 November to 0800 UTC on 08 November 2019. With strong northwesterly surface winds, many of the fire thermal anomalies exhibited rapid southeastward runs toward the coast. That region of Australia had just experienced severe to record 3-month rainfall deficiencies — which included the driest October on record for the southern third of the country.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Longwave Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Longwave Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images created using McIDAS-V (below) provided another view of the dense smoke plumes from 0000-0610 UTC. Toward the end of the animation — in the upper left portion of the satellite scene — plumes of blowing dust could be seen moving eastward from farther inland.

Himawari-8 True Color RGB images (credit: Bob Carp, SSEC) [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 True Color RGB images (credit: Bob Carp, SSEC) [click to play animation | MP4]

A combination of Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB and Shortwave Infrared (4.1 µm) imagery at 0328 UTC (below) revealed hot thermal signatures of the fires (yellow to red enhancement) at the source of the smoke plumes.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB + Shortwave Infrared (4.1 µm) imagery at 0328 UTC [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB + Shortwave Infrared (4.1 µm) imagery at 0328 UTC (credit: Bob Carp, SSEC) [click to enlarge]

A toggle between a Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image and a display of Sentinel-5 TROPOMI Tropospheric Vertical Column NO2 (below) indicated high NO2 concentrations immediately downwind of these fires.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image + TROPOMI Tropospheric Vertical Column NO2 [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB image + Sentinel-5 TROPOMI Tropospheric Vertical Column NO2 (credit: Bob Carp, SSEC) [click to enlarge]

The dense smoke plumes were also evident in a sequence of 3 VIIRS True Color RGB images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP, as visualized using RealEarth (below).

NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP [click to enlarge]

Smoke reduced the surface visibility to 3 miles or less at Grafton (YGFN) from 03-05 UTC (below).

Time series of surface report data from Grafton, New South Wales [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface report data from Grafton, New South Wales [click to enlarge]


Typhoon Bualoi in the West Pacific Ocean

October 22nd, 2019 |

JMA Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

2.5-minute rapid scan JMA Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) displayed Category 4 Typhoon Bualoi west of the Mariana Islands in the West Pacific Ocean on 22 October 2019. Note the rapid clearing and expansion of the eye after 04 UTC, as the tropical cyclone continued its trend of intensification (ADT | SATCON) while moving over water possessing high values of Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Heat Content.

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared images during that period when the eye rapidly cleared are shown below; the visible images eventually revealed mesovortices within the eye.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play animation | MP4]

In a toggle between NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1543 UTC (below), note the bright streak on DNB image from lightning activity in the eastern eyewall, along with moonlight side-illumination of some overshooting tops.

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (credit: William Straka, CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (credit: William Straka, CIMSS) [click to enlarge]

Convectively-generated gravity waves off the coast of Western Australia

October 22nd, 2019 |

Himawari-8 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

JMA Himawari-8 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm) images (above) revealed 2 distinct pulses of long-lived gravity waves that propagated northward/northwestward/westward from the coast of Western Australia during the 20-22 October 2019 period. These waves appear to have been generated by thunderstorms near and along the coast — and traveled as far northward as Christmas Island (station identifier YPXM) and the Lesser Sunda Islands.

The corresponding Himawari-8 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images are shown below.

Himawari-8 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

Himawari-8 Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]