Stereoscopic view of Severe Convection over Nebraska

August 16th, 2018 |

GOES-16 (Left) and GOES-17 (Right) Visible (0.64) Imagery over Nebraska, 1902 UTC 15 August – 0157 UTC 16 August 2018 (Click to play mp4 animation)

GOES-17 Data shown in this post are preliminary and non-operational!

A Strong thunderstorm developed over Nebraska on 15 August, depositing baseball-sized hail in Arthur County. This storm was sampled by a GOES-16 Mesoscale sector, and the 1-minute imagery allowed views of the rotating updraft (Link). The stereoscopic view above, from the GOES-16 and GOES-17 CONUS sectors, shows the development and evolution of the storm at 5-minute increments (Click here for animated gif). To view the storm in three dimensions, cross your eyes until you view 3 images, and focus on the image in the middle. This storm develops the above-anvil cirrus plume that has been shown to be associated with severe weather, as in this case.

Carr Fire in northern California

August 11th, 2018 |
GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

* GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non=operational *

A comparison of GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 (GOES-East) Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (dark black to red pixels) associated with the Carr Fire in northern California on 11 August 2018. A GOES-16 Mesoscale Domain Sector was providing images at 1-minute intervals. This comparison demonstrates how fire detection can be affected by both satellite viewing angle and shortwave infrared detector spatial resolution (4 km at satellite sub-point for the GOES-14/15 Imager, vs 2 km for the GOES-16/17 ABI).

A toggle between 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 False Color and Thermal Infrared (10.9 µm) imagery viewed using RealEarth (below) showed new fire activity (clusters of red pixels) along the northeastern edge of the Carr Fire burn scar on the False Color image, as well as smoke plumes drifting northeastward; the heat signatures (brighter white pixels) of smaller fires hidden by the smoke were more clearly ssen on the Thermal Infrared image. As of this date the Carr Fire was the 8th largest and 6th most destructive fire on record in California, and was responsible for 8 fatalities.

Landsat-8 False Color and Thermal Infrared (10.9 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 False Color and Thermal Infrared (10.9 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Holy Fire in southern California, as viewed by 4 GOES

August 9th, 2018 |
Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 [click to play MP4 animation]

Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images from GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 [click to play MP4 animation]

 * GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational *

GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-14, GOES-17 and GOES-16 (GOES-East) Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (black to yellow to red pixels) associated with the Holy Fire that was burning in southern California on 09 August 2018. This comparison demonstrates how fire detection can be affected by both satellite viewing angle and shortwave infrared detector spatial resolution (4 km at satellite sub-point for the GOES-14/15 Imager, vs 2 km for the GOES-16/17 ABI).

On the previous day, a 30-meter resolution Landsat-8 False Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image visualized using RealEarth (below) provided a more detailed view of the Holy Fire, showing active fires (brighter red) around the northern and eastern perimeter of the burn scar and the smoke plume that was drifting to the north and northwest.

Landsat-8 False Color image [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 False Color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Stereoscopic views of convection along the Texas Gulf Coast

August 8th, 2018 |

GOES-16 (left) and GOES-17 (right) visible (0.64 µm) imagery showing convection near Houston TX on 8 August 2018 (Click to play mp4 animation)

GOES-17 Imagery in this post is preliminary and non-operational.

GOES-16, operational as GOES-East at 75.2º W Longitude, and GOES-17, in a check-out mode at 89.5º W Longitude, viewed convection in and around Houston TX (apparent in the clear skies at the start of the animation) on 8 August 2018 (Click here for animated gif). Stereoscopic views of this convection (achieved by crossing your eyes until 3 images appears, and focusing on the image in the middle) reveal the three-dimensional nature of the convection, in particular the effects of an outflow boundary propagating northward towards Houston.