GOES-16 ABI Derived Products such as Cloud-top Phase in AWIPS

August 14th, 2019 |
AWIPS

AWIPS image of the Contiguous US domain showing the ABI 3.9 µm (on the left portion of the image and the ABI 1.6 µm (on the right portion of the image). The readout of the Level 2 cloud-top phase is also displayed.

The above animation shows the ABI 3.9 µm band for regions of less solar illumination and the ABI 1.6 µm “snow/ice” band for regions more fully illuminated. Also shown is a readout of the GOES-16 cloud-type phase product for a point in eastern Texas. Note how the estimates range for this location from clear sky, liquid water, mixed phase and super-cooled droplets. This shows one example of how to use imagery in conjunction with derived products. These images where generated in AWIPS using a procedure.

Cloud-top phase can be found in RealEarth (search on ‘phase’), GEOCAT (direct link to cloud-top type), and the GOES-R cloud page. An archive of netCDF are held in NOAA’s CLASS.

There are many “Level 2” or derived products generated from the ABI radiances. These include, but are not limited to: cloud proprieties, atmospheric motion, fire, stability, sea and land surface temperatures. More information on these products can be found on the Algorithm Working Group web page, product quality web page or these links.

AWIPS image

AWIPS image of the Contiguous US domain showing the ABI 3.9 µm (on the left portion of the image and the ABI 1.6 µm (on the right portion of the image). The readout of the Level 2 cloud-top phase is also displayed.

True-Color RGBs with GOES-16 Data

June 15th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI True-Color RGB over the Northern Hemisphere, 2030 UTC on 15 June 2017 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing

True-Color Imagery can be computed quickly in AWIPS using several simple xml files and Python code. An example is shown above. The Green Band that is missing from the ABI is simulated using a combination of the Blue Visible (0.47 µm), Red Visible (0.64 µm), and Veggie Bands (0.86 µm), and that simulated Green is then combined with the Blue and Red bands to create the imagery seen above. Some modest stretching is done to enhance contrast.

GOES-16 Resolution in southern Canada with AWIPS

March 3rd, 2017 |

AWIPS Displays of GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) imagery at 1511 UTC (CONUS) and 1510 UTC (Full Disk) (Click to enlarge)

Note: GOES-16 data shown on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing on-orbit testing.

GOES-16 data that flow into AWIPS for Full Disk display are not at Full Resolution; rather, they are degraded to approximately 6-km resolution. The northern boundary of the GOES-16 ‘CONUS’ domain (GOES-16 data do flow into AWIPS at full resolution for this domain) is very close to the US-Canada border (as shown in this animation of all 16 bands from this blog post, and also in the animation above). When zoomed out, there is little apparent difference in the two images. If you zoom in, however, as shown below with Band 2 (0.64 µm) imagery, the seam between the two resolutions is very noticeable.

GOES-16 Visible Imagery, 1925 UTC, over southern Canada and northern Minnesota/North Dakota (Click to enlarge)

The change in resolution occurs for all bands. The 10.3 µm imagery, below, shows the change north of Montana, Idaho and Washington.

ABI Band 13 (10.3 µm) Imagery at 1510 UTC in the AWIPS CONUS domain (full resolution) and in the AWIPS Full Disk Domain (reduced resolution). (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 Data are flowing into AWIPS

March 2nd, 2017 |

All 16 GOES-16 ABI Bands as displayed in AWIPS [click to enlarge]

All 16 GOES-16 ABI Bands as displayed in AWIPS [click to enlarge]

Note: GOES-16 data shown on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing on-orbit testing.

GOES-16 Data started flowing into the National Weather Service’s AWIPS system via NOAAPORT at 1800 UTC on 2 March 2017. At present, all 16 bands from the ABI, as well as select band differences and RGB products, are available. The animation above shows the 16 bands (Click here for a faster animation) in the GOES-16 CONUS Sector displayed over the predefined AWIPS CONUS Domain. Two RGBs (Red-Green-Blue Composites) are shown below: The ‘Icing’ RGB and the Daytime Composite are shown. The Icing RGB makes use of the Snow/Ice Channel from GOES-16, at 1.61 µm, that is in a region of the electromagnetic spectrum where ice strongly absorbs radiation. Thus regions including ice appear red or violet.

Icing and Daytime Composite RGBs [click to enlarge]

Icing and Daytime Composite RGBs [click to enlarge]

The predefined AWIPS CONUS domain and the GOES-R CONUS Sector do not overlap. The toggle below shows GOES-R CONUS Sector data displayed on a Full Disk Image, along with the same image over the AWIPS CONUS domain. The southern and eastern parts of the GOES-R CONUS Domain do not show up in the pre-defined AWIPS CONUS domain. Note also that the GOES-16 CONUS Domain does not extend very far northward from the US-Canada border. Forecast Offices over the northern United States will have to rely on Full Disk imagery (at 6-km resolution in AWIPS) when looking into Canada for features slipping southward in northwest flow.

GOES-16 CONUS Domain Band 3 (0.86 µm) displayed on Hemispheric Projection and on the regular AWIPS CONUS Projection [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 CONUS Domain Band 3 (0.86 µm) displayed on Hemispheric Projection and on the regular AWIPS CONUS Projection [click to enlarge]