Super Typhoon Maria

July 5th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Typhoon Maria underwent a period of rapid intensification (ADT | SATCON) while it was just northwest of Guam late in the day on 05 July 2018, becoming the first Category 5 Super Typhoon of the 2018 West Pacific season. Rapid-scan Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Maria during this period of rapid intensification. Cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures reached -80ºC (violet enhancement) at times in the eyewall of the storm.

A GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) showed the pinhole eye of Maria around the time it reached Category 5 intensity. The tropical cyclone was moving over water with high values of Ocean Heat Content — and was in an environment characterized by low values of Deep-layer Wind Shear.

GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

GPM GMI Microwave (85 GHz) image [click to enlarge]

Mesovortices could be seen within the eye on Himawari-8 Visible imagery (below). However, note how the eye became less distinct and increased in diameter toward the end of the animation.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Shortly after 00 UTC on 06 July, Maria began the process of an eyewall replacement cycle as shown in MIMIC TC morphed microwave imagery (below) — and during the following 6-12 hours a decreasing trend in storm intensity was seen (ADT | SATCON).

MIMIC TC morphed microwave image product [click to play animation]

MIMIC TC morphed microwave image product [click to play animation]

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1603 UTC on 06 July (below; courtesy of William Straka, CIMSS) showed Category 4 Typhoon Maria after the eye had filled following the eyewall replacement cycle.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

===== 08 July Update =====

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Super Typhoon Maria re-intensified to Category 5 intensity at 12 UTC on 08 July (SATCON) — Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) displayed a large (30 nautical mile wide) eye. The subtle signature of mesovortices could be seen rotating within the eye.

During the preceding daylight hours, Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (below) showed the eye mesovortices in better detail.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

However, Maria was again downgraded to a Category 4 storm at 00 UTC on 09 July, as another eyewall replacement cycle took place (DMSP-17 microwave image) and the storm began to move over water having slightly cooler Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Heat Content. The eye and its mesovortices continued to be prominent in Himawari-8 Visible and Infrared imagery (below).

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Hurricane Maria downgraded to a Tropical Storm off the East Coast

September 26th, 2017 |
GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) image, with Deep-Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) image, with Deep-Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

After its final 2 days of northward motion as a Category 1 storm well southeast of the Outer Banks of North Carolina, Hurricane Maria was downgraded to a Tropical Storm at 2100 UTC on 26 September 2017. A comparison of the 2345 UTC September GOES-13 (GOES-East) Infrared Window (10.7 µm) image and an overlay of the 00 UTC 27 September Deep-Layer Wind Shear product (above) showed that Maria had been moving northward into an environment of increasing northeasterly shear, aiding the decrease of storm organization and intensity. However, due to the large size of the strong wind field associated with Maria, surface wind gusts as high as 59 mph were reported along the Outer Banks.

The effect of increasing wind shear was obvious in the satellite presentation of GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) — the low-level circulation center (LLCC) was becoming more exposed with time, while deep convection remained southeast of the LLCC.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

The entrainment of dry air into the northern semicircle of Maria was evident as a warming/drying trend depicted on GOES-16 Lower-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images (below).

GOES-16 Lower-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Lower-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images [click to play MP4 animation]

Maria: Tropical Storm Watch for the Outer Banks of North Carolina

September 24th, 2017 |
Track of Hurricane Maria [click to enlarge]

Track of Hurricane Maria [click to enlarge]

* GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing *

Hurricane Maria was downgraded to a Category 2 storm at 12 UTC on 24 September 2017 (above), when it was located about halfway between Miami and Bermuda.

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed a close-up view of the eye region of Maria during the daylight hours.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Due to the large size of the radius of Tropical Storm force winds, a Tropical Storm Watch was issued late in the day for the Outer Banks and adjacent inland areas of North Carolina (below).

NHC advisory

UPDATE: 12 hours later, much of the Tropical Storm Watch was upgraded to a Tropical Storm Warning.

The Eye of Maria north of Hispaniola

September 21st, 2017 |

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Hurricane Maria presented a very interesting eye structure during the course of the day on 21 September 2017, as shown in the mp4 animation above (also available as a YouTube video).  The animation shows 10.3 µm imagery every 2 minutes from 0849 UTC through 2122 UTC on 21 September 2017.

Pete Pokrandt, at the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Department, created a similar animation using the 0.64 µm Visible channel on GOES-16.

30-second interval (using overlapping 1-minute interval Mesoscale Sector) GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images covering the 6-hour period from 1031-1631 UTC are shown below. During this time, Maria re-intensified to a Category 3 hurricane, with the eye centered just off the northeastern coast of the Dominican Republic.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images at 30-second intervals (Click to animate)

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images at 30-second intervals (Click to animate)

For more information on Maria, visit the National Hurricane Center website.  The CIMSS Tropical Weather Website has information as well.