Decker Fire in Colorado

October 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the afternoon/evening smoke plume and the persistent thermal anomaly (cluster of hot pixels) associated with the Decker Fire burning just southwest of Salida, Colorado on 02 October 2019.

A closer view of the fire was provided by a 4-panel comparison of GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared, Fire Power, Fire Temperature and Fire Area products (below). More information on these GOES Fire Detection and Characterization Algorithm (FDCA) products can be found here. Windy conditions on this day —  with sustained speeds of 20-30 mph and gusts to 46 mph — promoted rapid fire growth during the afternoon hours.

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm), Fire Power, Fire Temperature and Fire Area [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm), Fire Power, Fire Temperature and Fire Area [click to play animation | MP4]

A sequence of VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window images from Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 as viewed using RealEarth (below) showed the smoke plume and the fire’s thermal anomaly (cluster of dark black pixels).

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 um) images from Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 [click to enlarge]

VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images from Suomi NPP and NOAA-20 [click to enlarge]

A time series of surface observation data from the Salida Airport (identifier KANK, located just northwest of the fire) revealed southwesterly winds gusting to 20-29 knots as the dew point dropped to the -1 to -11ºF range — creating Relative Humidity values as low as 4% — during the afternoon hours (below).

Time series of surface observation data from Salida, Colorado [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observation data from Salida, Colorado [click to enlarge]

===== 03 October Update =====

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

The Decker Fire continued to burn on 03 October, as seen using 1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-17 “Red” Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (above). Although surface winds were still gusting as high as 30 knots at Salida, additional boundary layer moisture (dew points were in the 20s F) helped to slow the rate of fire growth compared to the previous day. The southeasterly winds transported some low-altitude smoke toward Salida, reducing the visibility to 5-7 miles at times (below).

Time series of surface observation data from Salida, Colorado [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observation data from Salida, Colorado [click to enlarge]

A comparison of GOES-16 (GOES-East) and GOES-17 (GOES-West) Shortwave Infrared images with topography (below) demonstrated the effect of large satellite viewing angles on apparent fire location in areas of rugged terrain — note the offset in the position of the Decker Fire thermal anomaly between the 2 satellites (the viewing angle of the fire from each satellite is about 53 degrees).

GOES-16 and GOES-17 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with topography [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 and GOES-17 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with topography (highways are plotted in cyan) [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-17 ABI Temperature Data Quality Flags (TDQF) thresholds updated

October 2nd, 2019 |

Top: Thumbnails of GOES-17 and GOES-16 ABI Band 12 (9.6 µm) on August 1, 2019. Bottom: Time series of GOES-17 minus GOES-16 brightness temperature for a region located between the two satellites. Also plotted is the GOES-17 Focal Plane Temperature. The reduced duration of the GOES-17 data to be flagged is highlighted. [click to enlarge]

As of 19:45 UTC on August 8, 2019, the new Look-Up-Table (LUT) went into operations for use in the GOES-17 ABI Temperature Data Quality Flags (TDQF). These hotter thresholds are possible due to the recent implementation of the Predictive Calibration algorithm.  Note that the image also includes the percent good (and conditionally usable) values (flagged 0 or 1) for both GOES-16 and GOES-17 ABI. Recall there are 5 Data Quality Flags for ABI data:

  • DQF:percent_good_pixel_qf = 1.f ;
  • DQF:percent_conditionally_usable_pixel_qf = 0.f ;
  • DQF:percent_out_of_range_pixel_qf = 0.f ;
  • DQF:percent_no_value_pixel_qf = 0.f ;
  • DQF:percent_focal_plane_temperature_threshold_exceeded_qf = 0.f

The last one, DQF:percent_focal_plane_temperature_threshold_exceeded_qf, reports what percentage of the images pixels are warmer than the threshold value. Note that the thresholds on both the increasing and decreasing temperatures are also reported in the meta-data.

Near realtime brightness temperature comparisons between GOES-16 and GOES-17, as well as historical comparisons for a region centered on the equator and half way between the two satellites.

From the NOAA Notification:

Product(s) or Data Impacted: GOES-17 ABI auxiliary field change

Date/Time of Initial Impact: August 8, 2019 1945 UTC

Details/Specifics of Change:

The GOES-17 ABI Temperature Data Quality Flags (TDQF) thresholds for the thermal bands have been updated to the values in the table below.  This update will make utilizing the TDQF more effective for flagging saturated data caused by the GOES-17 ABI cooling system anomaly. There will be no impacts to distribution caused by this update.

Table of updated Temperature Quality Data Flag thresholds [click to enlarge]

Table of updated Temperature Quality Data Flag thresholds [click to enlarge]

Update (10/02/2019)

On October 2, 2019, at 17:04 UTC, updates for a number of the ABI GOES-17 DQF thresholds were implemented in the operational system. NOAA Notification: https://www.ospo.noaa.gov/data/messages/2019/MSG2751954.html

Table of updated Temperature Quality Data Flag thresholds

Table of updated Temperature Quality Data Flag thresholds [click to enlarge]. The bold numbers are those values that were updated on October 2nd. 

Eruption of Popocatépetl in Mexico

October 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Split Window (10.3 – 12.3 µm), Ash RGB, Dust RGB and SO2 RGB images [click to play animation | MP4]

A sequence of GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Split Window (10.3 – 12.3 µm), Ash RGB, Dust RGB and SO2 RGB images (above) revealed signatures of volcanic plumes from an eruption of Popocatépetl on 02 October 2019. According to the Volcanic Ash Advisory issued at 1323 UTC (below), the longer plume moving westward — which was clearly seen in the Visible imagery — extended to an altitude of 21,000 feet. The second volcanic plume moving northwestward — which exhibited subtle signatures in the Split Window and RGB images — extended to an altitude of 24,000 feet. Although neither the Split Window nor the RGB images showed strong volcanic cloud signatures, taken together they helped to confirm the presence and transport of the 2 separate plumes.

GOES-16 Split Window image with the text of the 1323 UTC Volcanic Ash Advisory [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Split Window (10.3 – 12.3 µm) image showing the text of the 1323 UTC Volcanic Ash Advisory [click to enlarge]

The radiometrically-retrieved Volcanic Ash Height product from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site indicated a maximum height in the 5-7 km range for the westward-moving plume (below).

GOES-16 Volcanic Ash Height product [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Volcanic Ash Height product [click to play animation | MP4]