Severe Thunderstorms in southwest Missouri

July 19th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), with hourly surface plots plotted in cyan/yellow and SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation | Animated GIF]

1-minute Mesoscale Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed the intensification of thunderstorms over far southwestern Missouri during the early evening hours on 19 July 2018. Surface outflow from these storms produced damaging winds (SPC storm reports), including a gust to 55 knots or 63 mph at Branson (plot | list) at 0025 UTC. Strong winds capsized a boat on Table Rock Lake — located about midway between Branson West Airport KFWB and Branson Airport KBBG (map) — resulting in 17 fatalities. The 0025 UTC image showed a new cell which had recently developed just northeast of Branson; its overshooting tops began rapidly penetrating the anvil debris of the earlier storm at 0018 UTC.

The corresponding GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) revealed cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures cooling to the -75 to -79ºC range (shades of light gray to white) with both thunderstorms in southwest Missouri.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm), with hourly surface plots plotted in cyan/yellow and SPC storm reports plotted in dark blue [click to play MP4 animation | Animated GIF]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm), with hourly surface plots plotted in cyan/yellow and SPC storm reports plotted in dark blue [click to play MP4 animation | Animated GIF]

Tornado outbreak in Iowa

July 19th, 2018 |

GOES-16 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, top left), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, top right), Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, bottom left) and

GOES-16 Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm, top left), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm, top right), Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm, bottom left) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, bottom right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 (GOES-East) Upper-level Water Vapor (6.2 µm), Mid-level Water Vapor (6.9 µm), Low-level Water Vapor (7.3 µm) and “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) revealed the well-defined signature of a mid-tropospheric lobe of vorticity moving from southeastern South Dakota across Iowa during the day on 19 July 2018 — this feature provided synoptic-scale forcing for ascent which aided in the development of severe thunderstorms in central and eastern Iowa. A number of tornadoes were reported, along with some large hail and damaging winds (SPC storm reports).

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

A closer look using 1-minute Mesoscale Sector GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed the line of thunderstorms as they developed in advance of an approaching cold/occluded front (surface analyses). Two larger storms were dominant, which produced tornadoes causing significant damage and injuries in Pella KPEA and Marshalltown KMIW — above-anvil plumes were evident with both of these supercells. In addition, early in the animation a few orphan anvils could be seen along the southern end of the line (southeast and east of Des Moines KDSM).

The corresponding GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -65ºC to -70ºC with the larger Pella storm, and around -55ºC with the smaller Marshalltown storm to the north.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) image, with ProbSevere contour and parameters [click to enlarge]

The NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere model (viewed using RealEarth) had a ProbTor value of 74% at 2055 UTC for the Pella storm (above) and 83% at 2130 UTC for the Marshalltown storm (below). GOES-derived Cloud-top glaciation rate (from infrared imagery) is one of the predictors used in the model.

GOES-16 Infrared image, with ProbSevere parameters [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) image, with ProbSevere contour and parameters [click to enlarge]

A toggle between 375-meter resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1946 UTC (below) provided a look at the early stage of development of tornado-producing convection.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, with plots of SPC tornado reports within +/- 30 minutes of the images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images, with plots of SPC tornado reports within +/- 30 minutes of the images [click to enlarge]

Additional satellite imagery and analysis of this event can be found on the Satellite Liaison Blog.


Comparisons of GOES-15, GOES-16 and GOES-17

July 17th, 2018 |
Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

* GOES-17 imagery shown here are preliminary and non-operational *

A 3-panel comparison of Visible images from GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-17 and GOES-16 (GOES-East) shown above highlights the dissipation of fog in the Strait of Juan de Fuca during the morning hours on 17 July 2018. The three sets of images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite (with no re-mapping) — GOES-17 was at its post-launch checkout location of 89.5ºW longitude.  Images from GOES-16/17 were at 5-minute intervals, while images from GOES-15 were every 5-15 minutes depending on the operational scan schedule of that GOES-West satellite.

A similar 3-satellite comparison shown below focuses on the development of showers and thunderstorms across western Montana, between Missoula KMSO and Butte KBTM. The improved spatial resolution (0.5 km at sub-satellite point for GOES-16/17, vs 1.0 km for GOES-15) and more frequent images allowed small-scale features of the storms to be more easily identified and followed.

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

One final comparison, shown below, depicts thunderstorms over western Colorado — outflow boundaries south of these storms produced strong surface winds in the Grand Junction area (SPC storm reports).

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation | MP4]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) — SPC storm reports of wind are plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]


Ferguson Fire in California forms a pyrocumulonimbus cloud

July 15th, 2018 |
GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, center) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

* GOES-17 images shown here are preliminary and non-operational *

The Ferguson Fire in central California produced a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) cloud during the afternoon hours on 15 July 2018. GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (above) showed that the high-altitude portion of the pyroCb cloud then drifted northeastward toward the California/Nevada border, where cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures cooled to near -55ºC (orange enhancement) as it crossed the border around 0005 UTC on 16 July.

A comparison of Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm), GOES-17 (0.64 µm) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm) is shown below — with the imagery displayed in the native projection of each satellite. Images from GOES-16/17 are at 5-minute intervals, while images from GOES-15 are every 5-15 minutes depending on the operational scan schedule of that GOES-West satellite. GOES-17 was at its post-launch checkout position of 89.5ºW longitude, so it offered a more direct view of the pyroCb cloud.

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation]

Visible images from GOES-15 (0.63 µm, left), GOES-17 (0.64 µm, center) and GOES-16 (0.64 µm, right) [click to play animation]

A toggle between NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images (below) showed the pyroCb cloud southwest of the California/Nevada border (between Bridgeport KBAN and Mammoth KMMH) at 2327 UTC. In spite of a minimum cloud-top 10.8 µm infrared brightness temperature of -59ºC (red enhancement), note the darker (warmer) appearance of the cloud on the 3.7 µm image — this is due to reflection of solar radiation off the smaller ice particles of the pyroCb anvil. The -59ºC temperature roughly corresponded to an altitude of 13 km or 42.6 kft on the 00 UTC Reno, Nevada rawinsonde report (plot | data)

NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-19 Visible (0.63 µm), Shortwave Infrared (3.7 µm) and Infrared Window (10.8 µm) images [click to enlarge]

A time lapse of the pyroCb was created by Sierra Fire Watch (below).

Time lapse [click to play YouTube video]

Time lapse [click to play YouTube video]