Harvey and GLM Lightning

August 25th, 2017 |

GOES-16 ABI Band 1 (0.47 µm) and color-coded GLM parallax-corrected observations of lightning groups for each 1 minute in the 5 minutes prior to the nominal time of the ABI image (red: oldest; yellow: latest), 1247-1332 UTC on 25 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

The Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) on GOES-16 allows observations of lightning associated with Hurricane Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico. The animation above, from 1247 to 1332 UTC on 25 August 2017, shows lightning group observations every minute, color-coded by time (red is the oldest, yellow is the most recent, corresponding to the nominal time of the ABI Image), superimposed on GOES-16 ABI Channel 1 Visible Imagery (0.47 µm). Most of the Hurricane lightning is in the outer bands of the storm, with very little in the central core. This distribution is not unusual.

(A similar animation from 1812-1857 UTC on 24 August 2017, when lightning was observed near the storm core, is here.)

(Thanks to Dave Santek, SSEC, for this animation!)

Added: The animation below (for 1352-1437 UTC on 25 August) is over simulated True-Color Imagery, and for this GLM plot, the latest 1-minute Groups plots (that correspond to the ABI Image time) are red, and the earliest are Yellow.

Simulated True Color Imagery from GOES-16 ABI and 1-minute GLM Group data overlain; red groups corresponding to the nominal image time and yellow groups are oldest, 1352-1437 UTC on 25 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Hurricane Harvey approaches the Texas Gulf Coast

August 25th, 2017 |
GOES-16

GOES-16 Low-Level Water Vapor Infrared (7.3 µm) images, 0217-1347 UTC on 25 August 2017 (click to play animation)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Low-Level Water Vapor Infrared imagery (7.34 µm) from GOES-16, above, shows Hurricane Harvey developing a distinct eye shortly after sunrise on 25 August 2017 after intermittent appearances of the eye during the night. Harvey is a strong Hurricane at 950 mb (as of 700 AM CDT according to the National Hurricane Center) and is approaching the central Gulf Coast of Texas. Strong upper-level outflow to the north and then east and south is apparent in the Water Vapor animation above, and an absence of dry air near the storm portends no significant weakening before the storm reaches the Coastline. Microwave estimates of Total Precipitable Water, below, from this site, continue to show extreme moisture amounts enveloping the storm.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water estimates for the 24 hours ending 1300 UTC on 25 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Visible imagery, below, from after sunrise on 25 August 2017, show a symmetric storm with a visible eye. The “Cirrus Channel” near-infrared GOES-16 Channel (1.38), bottom, shows the extensive cirrus canopy from the storm covering much of the western Gulf of Mexico and adjacent states.

GOES-16

GOES-16 Visible Images (0.64 µm) images, 1242-1417 UTC on 25 August 2017 (click to play animation)

GOES-16 near-Infrared Images (1.38 µm) image, 1432 UTC on 25 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

For the latest information on Harvey, consult the pages of the National Hurricane Center, or the CIMSS Tropical Weather Website. In addition to the flooding threat posed from Harveywith multiple days of rain, storm surge at the coast promises considerable inundation.

GOES-16 animation showing Clean Window IR (10.3 µm) and City Lights Background at night, True Color Imagery during the day, 1100-1900 UTC on 25 August 2017 (Click to enlarge)

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1853 UTC , below, provided a detailed view of the hurricane as it continued to near the Texas coast.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (Click to enlarge)