GOES-16 Mesoscale Sectors: 30-second imagery of severe thunderstorms over the Texas Panhandle

March 28th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, with SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes [click to play MP4 animation]

** The GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data and are undergoing testing. **

The Storm Prediction Center issued a Moderate Risk for severe thunderstorms over the southern Plains on 28 March 2017. As a result, both 1-minute GOES-16 Mesoscale Sectors were positioned over that region, providing images at 30-second intervals. ABI 0.5-km resolution Visible (0.64 µm) images with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports of hail and tornadoes (above; also available as a 193 Mbyte animated GIF) showed a very detailed view of the overshooting tops associated with the storms during the 2030-2359 UTC time period.

The images were centered approximately over the Lubbock (KLBB) to Midland (KMAF) to Abilene (KABI) region (below).

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) image, with station identifiers KLBB, KMAF and KABI highlighted [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) image, with station identifiers KLBB, KMAF and KABI highlighted [click to enlarge]

Cyclone Debbie makes landfall in Queensland, Australia

March 28th, 2017 |

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play animation]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to play animation]

Cyclone Debbie formed in the Coral Sea on 22 March 2017, and eventually intensified to a Category 3 storm (ADT | SATCON) as it moved southward toward Australia. Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed the eye of Debbie as it was making landfall in Queensland, near Prosperpine (YBPN).

Landsat-8 false-color, with Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Landsat-8 false-color, with Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images [click to enlarge]

The Landsat-8 satellite made an overpass of the eye at 2358 UTC (above), as a large convective burst had developed within the northern semicircle of the eyewall (which was also evident in the corresponding Himawari-8 Visible and Infrared Window images viewed using RealEarth).

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) and GMI Microwave (85 GHZ) Images around 1430 UTC on 27 March [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) and GMI Microwave (85 GHZ) Images around 1430 UTC on 27 March [click to enlarge]

Debbie was undergoing an eyewall replacement cycle as the storm center approached the coast — this was evident in Microwave (85 GHz) images from GMI at 1425 (above) and SSMIS at 2017 UTC (below) from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site.

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) and DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images around 2017 UTC on 27 March [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) and DMSP-18 SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images around 2017 UTC on 27 March [click to enlarge]

The MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (below; also available as an MP4 animation) showed copious tropical moisture associated with Cyclone Debbie, which led to rainfall accumulations as high as 780 mm (30.7 inches) — with rainfall rates up to 200 mm (7.9 inches) per hour — and record flooding along the coast from Brisbane to Lismore.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation]