GOES-16 Visible and Cirrus Channels

March 21st, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, 1202-1732 UTC on 21 March [click to play animated gif]

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) images, 1202-1732 UTC on 21 March [click to play animated gif]

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational data that are undergoing testing.

GOES-16 Visible imagery captured the erosion of near-surface clouds over Ohio on 21 March 2017. A benefit of the routine 5-minute imagery is that it allows better estimates of exactly when the low clouds will clear out. There is ample suggestion in the animation above of the presence of cirrus clouds. The GOES-16 ABI has a channel at 1.38 µm that is specifically designed to detect cirrus clouds because that is a region in the electromagnetic spectrum where strong water vapor absorption occurs. The animation of ‘cirrus channel’ imagery, below, confirms the presence of widespread cirrus clouds.

GOES-16 Cirrus Channel (1.38 µm) images, 1202-1732 UTC on 21 March [click to play animated gif]

GOES-16 Cirrus Channel (1.38 µm) images, 1202-1732 UTC on 21 March [click to play animated gif]

The MODIS instrument also has a similar near-infrared Cirrus spectral band — and a comparison of Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Cirrus (1.375 µm) images at 1601 UTC is shown below.

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Cirrus (1.375 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Visible (0.65 µm) and Cirrus (1.375 µm) images [click to enlarge]